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Full text of "Wiltshire archaeological and natural history magazine"

w. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE 

Irrjfieologiral anil Jhteral listen) 
MAGAZINE, 

FORMED IN THAT COUNTY, A.D. 1853. 

VOL. XXXVI. 

1909—1910. 




DEVIZES_: 
C. H. Woodward, 4, St. John Street. 



December, 1910. 



CONTENTS OF VOL. XXXVI. 



No. CXI. June, 1909. 

PAGE 

The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury : By C. Haskins 1 
Notes on the Churches of Boscombe, Idmiston, Winterbourne 
Gunner, Winterslow, Farley, Pitton, West Grimstead, and 

I vychurch Priory : By C. E. Ponting, F.S.A 13 

Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661 : By the Rev. W. 

Symonds 27 

The Saxon Boundaries of Downton, Wilts : By the Rev. A. Du 
Boulay Hill, Rector of East Bridgford, Notts, formerly Vicar 

of Downton 50 

The Mollusca of Wiltshire : By E. W. Swanton 57 

On Neolithic Flints lying below the present surface at Dinton : By 

the Rev. G. H. Engleheart, F.S.A 86 

The Society's MSS.— Quidhampton 90 

Notes on a Late Celtic Rubbish Heap near Oare : By Maud E. 

CUNNINGTON 125 

Notes 140 

Wilts Obituary 144 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Articles, &c 152 

Additions to Museum and Library :! . • 171 

List of Officers and Members of the Society 173 

Account of Receipts and Disbursements of the Society for the Year 

1908 182 

No. CXIL— December, 1909. 

The Fifty-Sixth General Meeting at Bradf ord-on-Avon 185 

"Javelins "and "Javelin Men": By B. Howard Cunnington, 

F.S.A. Scot 199 

Presidential Address by Dr. J. Beddoe, LL.D.,F.R.S., at the Bradford- 

on- Avon Meeting, June 29th, 1909 202 

The Norman Tympanum of Little Langford Church : By J. U. Powell 207 

The Society's MSS. — Quidhampton (continued) 213 

Malmesbury Election Petition, 1807 ; By E. O. P. Bouverie, F.S.A. 292 
The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lauhill, near 

Chippenham : By Maud E. Cunnington 300 

Notes on Barrows on King's Play Down, Heddington : By Maud E. 

Cunnington 311 

Notes on the Parish Church and Saxon Church, Bradford-on-Avon : 

By A. W. N. Burder, F.S.A 318 

Notes on some Wiltshire Merchants' Marks : By T. H. Baker 324 

The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum 329 

Wilts Obituary '. 337 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, <fec 340 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 353 

Wiltshire Illustrations and Pictures 356 

Wiltshire Portraits 357 

Additions to Museum and Library 358 



CONTENTS OF VOL. XXXVI. Ill 



No. CXIII. June, 1910. 

On the Date of the Ecclesiola at Bradford-on-Avon: By John Beddoe, 

M.D., LL.D., F.R.S., President of the Society 359 

Notes on Audley House, Salisbury : By J. J. Hammond 364 

The Excavation of a Roman Wellnr. Silbury Hill, October, 1908 : By 

J. W. Brooke, F.SA. (Scot.), F.R.N.S 373 

The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury : By T. H. Baker 376 

Salisbury. A Royal Aid and Supply for 1657 : Transcribed by the 

Rev. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A 413 

Notes on the Allington Gold Tore : By H. St. George Gray 435 

The Society's MSS 439 

A List of Briefs from the Register Books of Langley Burrell : Trans- 
cribed by the Rev. A. B. Mynors 448 

Notes on the Roman Antiquities in the Westbury Collection at the 

Museum, Devizes : By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington 464 

Notes on Iron Objects of Roman (?) Age in the Society's Museum at 

Devizes: By the Rev. E H. Goddard 478 

Notes 486 

Wilts Obituary 491 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 496 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 504 

Wilts Illustrations 505 

Wilts Portraits 506 

Additions to Museum and Library , 508 

Balance Sheet,1909 510 



No. CXIV. December, 1910. 

The Fifty-Seventh General Meeting at Calne 513 

Marlborough Chantries and the Supply of Clergy in Olden Days : 

By the Rev. Chr. Wordsworth 525 

" The Chantry," Marlborough : By C. E. Ponting, F.S.A 585 

A Mediaeval Earthwork nr.Morgan's Hill : By Mrs. M.E. Cunnington 590 

Tisbury Church : By E. Towry Whyte, M. A., F.S.A 599 

Notes on Barrows in South Wilts : By Lt.-Col. W. Hawley, F.S.A. 615 

Wilts Obituary , 629 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 631 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 641 

Wilts Illustrations , 642 

Wilts Portraits 642 ' 

Additions to Museum and Library 643 

Index to Vol. XXXVI '. 644 



IV CONTENTS OF VOL. XXXVI. 

Illustrations. 

Mural Painting, formerly existing over the Chancel Arch, Winterslow 
Church, 19. The Saxon Boundaries of Downton and Bishopstone, Wilts, 
52. Facsimile (|- linear dimensions) of Chirograph, A.D. 1268—9, 90. 
Objects from Late Celtic Rubbish Heap near Oare, Plates I, — VII., 125. 

Facsimile of Receipt for rent due to the Duchy of Lancaster from Salthrop, 
234. Lanhill Long Barrow — Entrance to chamber as excavated, 1909, 
300 ; Plan of Chamber, 301 ; Interior of chamber (2), 302 ; Entrance to 
chamber with roof restored, 307. Painted Panels of the Rood Screen of 
the Parish Church, Bradford-on-Avon, 320. Fragment of Recumbent 
Effigy, Parish Church, Bradford-on-Avon, 321. Wiltshire and other 
Merchants' Marks (3 Plates), 326—328. 

Portion of a Gold Tore, found on Allington Down, N. Wilts, 437. Roman 
Objects from Westbury (11 Plates), 470. Plate I. — Iron Objects found 
at or near a Roman Settlement at Baydon, 479. Plate II. — Iron Objects 
from different localities on the Downs, 480. Plate III. — Iron Objects 
from Rushall Down, 481. Plate IV. — Iron Objects found on the Downs, 
482. 

The Chantry, Marlborough — Plan and Details, 585 ; View into Oratory from 
Stair, 588 ; Roof of Dormitory, 588 ; North side, 588. Plan of Earth- 
work near Morgan's Hill, 591. Figs. 2, 3, and 4. — Sections across Banks 
and Ditches of Outer and Inner Enclosures, 593 . Tisbury Church,Wilts 
Plate I.— Plan, 601 ; Plate II.— Windows, &c, 602 ; Plate III.— Capitals, 
&c, 604 ; Plate IV,— Font, Capital, &c, 606. Sketch Plans of Barrows in 
South Wilts, 616. Figs. 1, 2, and 3.— Urns from Barrows, 617. Figs. 4, 
5, 6, 7, and 8. — Bronze and Stone Implements and " Grape Cup " from 
Barrows, 622. Fig. 9. — Spear-head from Brigmerston, 627. 



ERRATA, 
p. 143, 1. 18, for Avebury read Amesbury. 
p. 160, 1. I, for Maston read Marston. 
p. 171, 1. 19, for Aunt read Great Aunt. 
p. 197, 1. 3 from bottom, for Hardy read Harvey. 

„ 1. 2 from bottom, for Friend's read Friends', 
p. 433, 1. 14, for Titcombg read Titcombe. 

„ 1. 1 9, for Greeee read Greene, 
p. 482, note, for Great Chesterfield read Great Chesterford. 
]>. 491, 1. 17, for Wykeamist read Wykehamist, 
p. 522, 1. 6, and p. 524, 1. I, for Fergusson read Ferguson, 
p. 541, 1. 15, for Ro. Beauchamp read Ri. Beauchamp. 



2> > 21* 






'8 OCT 



W8 



No. CXI. 



JUNE, 1909. 



Vol. XXXVI. 



THE 



WILTSHIEE 

Irrjjivnkigiral nntt Enteral Bistort) 

MAGAZINE, 

}3u6It!»f}rti untfcr tt)e ffiltrrrttmt 

OF THE 

SOCIETY FORMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 18 5 3. 



EDITED BY 



BEV. E. H. GODDAED, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 




DEVIZES: 

Printed and sold foe the Society by C. H. Woodward, 

4, St. John Street. 



Price 5s. 6d. Members, Gratis. 



NOTICE TO MEMBEKS. 

TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols, 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
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WILTSHIRE 

IrrjjMlogiral nnfr lateral listen) 
MAGAZINE. 



No. CXI. JUNE, 1909. Vol. XXXVI. 



Contents. 

PAGE 

The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury : By C. 

Haskins 1 

Notes on the Churchks of Boscombb, Idmiston, Winterbourne 
Gunner, Winterslow, Farley, Pitton, West Grimstead, and 
Ivychuuch Priory: By C. E. Ponting, F.S.A 13 

Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661 : By the Bev. W. 

Symonds 27 

The Saxon Boundaries of DowNTON.Wilts : By the Rev. A. Du Boulay 

Hill, Rector of East Bridgford, Notts, formerly Vicar of Downton 50 

The Mollusca of Wiltshire: By E. W. Swanton 57 

The Society's MSS. — Quidhampton 90 

Notes on a late Celtic Bubbish Heap near Oare : By Maud E. 

Cunnington 125 

Notes 140 

Wilts Obituary... 144 

Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 152 

Additions to Museum and Library 171 

List of Officers and Members of the Society 173 

Account of Receipts and Disbursements of the Society for the 

Year 1908 182 



ILLUSTBATIONS. 

The Saxon Boundaries of Downton and Bishopstone, 
Wilts 52 

Facsimile (f linear dimensions) of Chirograph, A.D. 
1268—9 90 

Objects from Late Celtic Bubbish Heap near Oare, 
Plates I.— VII 125 

DEVIZES : C. H. Woodward, 4, Saint John Street. 



THE 

WILT SHIRE MAGA ZINE. 

"multoeum manibus gbande levattte onus." — Ovid. 
June, 1909. 

THE CHUKCH OF ST. THOMAS OF CANTERBURY, 

SALISBURY. 

By C. Haskins. 

[Head at the Salisbury Meeting, 1908.] 

The visitor who enters St. Thomas' for the first time sees 
apparently a large Perpendicular Church, but, after a short 
examination of the fabric, he will notice several points, including 
the chancel arch, the two thirteenth century arches communicating 
with the side chapels, and the remains of an Early English arch 
inside the wall of the south choir aisle, which give evidence that 
this is a much earlier Church than its general appearance conveys 
any idea of. St. Thomas' Church was built in the early part of 
the thirteenth century, and there is a record of one Robert, Rector 
of the Chapel of St. Thomas of Canterbury, as early as 1238, and 
in 1247 the name is given as Robert de Beavvor. This early 
Church was cruciform, and comparatively a small building, con- 
sisting of a nave, with a choir formed at the east end, and north 
and south transepts. The choir of this ancient Church was only 
40ft, 4in. in length, whereas the present choir is 59ft. long. The 
Church had no structural chancel, its absence being a common 
feature of town Churches in the Middle Ages. 

The late Rev. Edward Duke, in his book, Prolusiones Historical, 
tells us we must picture the original Church as being lighted with 
lancet windows, similar to those of the Cathedral, and that these 
windows were placed in the side walls of the nave where are now 
the pillars and arches, the Church having no side chapels, no 

VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. B 



2 The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury. 

aisles, no clerestory, and no tower. Later authorities, including 
Mr. Doran Webb, who for many years has closely studied every- 
thing connected with the fabric of this Church, are of opinion that 
it was originally cruciform, and with a south porch, and that the 
south end of this porch was incorporated in the north side of the 
tower, when the latter was built. The earliest addition to the 
Church appears to have been St. Stephen's Chapel, which stood 
parallel with the Church, in the two bays of the then east end of 
the south wall. There is amongst the ancient wills in the City 
Muniment Room the testament of George Meriot, Esq., dated 
Aug 28th, i.e., Thursday in the feast of St. Augustine, the Doctor, 
1410. He desired to be buried in the Church of the Friars 
Preachers of Fisherton. His benefactions included one set of 
scarlet ecclesiastical vestments to the altar of St. Stephen's in St. 
Thomas' Church, and he directed his executors to sell certain 
properties, and to pay " To the fabric of the Chapel of St. Stephen 
on the south side of St. Thomas' Church £10 provided it shall be 
faithfully begun, and fully constructed anew within 3 years of 
my death." This appears to show that St. Stephen's Chapel had 
stood long enough to require very extensive repairs, or rebuilding, 
in 1410. The next addition to the Church was Godmanstone's 
Chapel, which was built during the latter part of the fourteenth 
century ; this chapel stood on the north side of the choir. In the 
visitation of Bishop John Waltham, in 1395, Robert Elyon and 
John Styll are named as holding chantries in St. Thomas' Church, 
and in 1404 William Burgeys was appointed to the chantry of 
St. Bartholomew in the same Church. The Bishop's Registry of 
Institutions records that in 1415 Johannes Smyth was presented 
to the chantry of Robert Godmanstone. 

The bell tower appears to have been commenced in 1400. The 
will of Thomas de Boyton, which is in the City Corporation Muni- 
ment Room, shows that he bequeathed in 1400 " XX Merkes " to 
the new fabric on the south side of St. Thomas'. 

In 1403 the Rectory of St. Thomas was ceded by the Bishop to 
the Dean and Chapter, this arrangement received the sanction of 
the King, and was formally confirmed by Pope Boniface the Ninth 



By C. Haslcins. 3 

in 1404, later in the same year the Dean and Chapter granted 
"*' XII Merkes " towards the work of the Campanile of St. Thomas' 
Church, the amount to he advanced from the Treasury of the 
Cathedral till it should be repaid from the fruits and profits of the 
Church. 

After its completion people had to pass beneath this tower 
through an open arch into the Church. You probably have 
noticed on the top of the tower a mushroom-shaped erection 
of lead, which covers what one might describe as an incipient 
spire. Undoubtedly it was originally intended to finish off the 
tower with an open lace- work spire, but — as Mr. Doran Webb 
suggests — the builders finding that the thrust of the spire, 
with the rather thin walls, would be too much for the 
building, never carried the work beyond this small fragment of an 
octagonal spire. Old pictures of the Church show pinnacles upon 
the tower ; these were a constant source of trouble and expense 
to the churchwardens, and they were removed early in the nine- 
teenth century. 

The next information we get respecting the Church is that in 
the year 1447 the chancel or a part of it fell down, destroying in 
its fall one of the aisles, the latter being probably the Chapel of 
St. Stephen. An old deed dated 1448 (Dean and Chapter records) 
shows that the Dean and Chapter, who were under the rectorial 
obligation of seeing to the maintenance of the chancel, had decided 
to rebuild it upon the old lines, but the parishioners, amongst 
whom were the wealthy merchants, William Swayne, John Halle, 
Henry Swayne, and members of the Godmanstone family, were 
anxious to have a larger and more noble chancel than the old one, 
and they showed their devotion to the fabric of their Church by 
their eagerness to take a share in the work of increasing its size 
and its beauty. Consequently, on the 4th June in the 26th year 
of Henry VI., an agreement was signed between the Dean and 
Chapter and certain parishioners duly elected for the purpose, by 
the commonalty of the parish, including Willm. Swayne and John 
Halle, by which agreement the parishioners undertook to do all 
that the Dean and Chapter would not do to complete the enlarged 

B 2 



4 The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury. 

building. The Dean and Chapter undertook to lengthen the 
chancel on the north side, in accordance with the work done on 
the south side by the parishioners (probably one additional bay). 
They also promised to build the pillars, arches, and clerestory, on 
the north side to correspond with the work of the same kind done 
by the parishioners on the south side of the choir. The capitals 
of the pillars on the south side bear inscriptions, one being " The 
founder of this peler was art . . . John Nichol," another has 
the merchant's mark of John Webb upon it. The spring of the 
ancient arch, which was only uncovered a few years since, is un- 
doubtedly a portion of St. Stephen's Chapel, and this part of the 
Church, viz., the south chancel aisle, William Swayne undertook 
to rebuild and to make it 59 feet long, to correspond with the new 
chancel ; members of the Godmanstone and Hungerford families 
promising to make the Godmanstone or north chancel aisle the 
same length. 

When in the years 1445-6 the affluent merchant, William 
Swayne, was mayor of the city, he became the patron and friend 
of the Tailor's Guild. This fraternity, from its earliest days, had 
an altar in St. Thomas' (probably in St. Stephen's Chapel), but in 
1447, that is, the year in which St. Thomas' chancel fell down, and 
possibly owing to this disaster, the guild obtained a charter from 
Henry VI. which gave them licence to found their chantry in St. 
Edmund's Church. In 1448. however, that is, after the agreement 
to rebuild St. Thomas' had been made, the guild petitioned the 
King to revoke these letters patent, and to grant them a fresh 
charter, which would empower them to found their chantry of St. 
John the Baptist, in St. Thomas' Church. Their petition was 
successful, and a new charter was granted to them in 1449. The 
result was that William Swayne built, at his own cost, the enlarged 
south chancel aisle as a guild chapel, and in this chapel he founded 
two chantries, one an altar to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the 
other to St. John the Baptist, for the fraternity of tailors. Swayne's 
Chapel was completed during the episcopacy of Bishop Beauchamp, 
and we read that Richard Betan was admitted to the chantry of 
the Blessed Mary there devoutly founded on the presentation of 



By C. Haskins. 5 

William Swayne, merchant. The chapel is said to have been 
beautifully decorated and ornamented ; the east window, which 
was larger than it is at present, was filled with stained glass, the 
topmost tracery lights exhibited a representation of the Assumption 
of the Virgin, and the lower lights various saints, beneath canopies 
of enriched tabernacle work, with shields bearing the merchant 
marks of William Swayne, John Webb, and other patrons or 
masters of the guild. The ornaments and the greater part of the 
stained glass and decorations of this chapel were destroyed at the 
time of the visitation of the Commissioners, in 1548, but the 
mutilated remains of this window have recently been carefully 
arranged and re-leaded. The walls still show considerable remains 
of the original mural paintings, including the three well-preserved 
frescoes on the spandrils of the arches, " The Annunciation," " The 
Salutation," and " The Adoration." It has been suggested that 
there were originally six of these paintings, three on either side of 
the chapel, and that they represented the three joyful and the 
three sorrowful mysteries of the Eosary ; there are also a number 
of representations of the conventional pot of lilies which accom- 
panies the subject of the Annunciation, and also of the badge of 
the Garter, the latter being used, presumably, in honour of Bishop 
Beauchamp, who was chaplain, and who in 1475 became chancellor 
of this noble order. 

The beautiful Perpendicular roof of this chapel was built above 
the old corbel table, which originally was seen on the exterior wall 
of the choir, above the roof of St. Stephen's Chapel. The trans- 
verse beams of the roof are ornamented on each side with shields, 
bearing, respectively, the sacred emblems of "The Passion," the 
symbol of "The Trinity," the arms of Swayne," and Swayne's 
merchant's mark. The beams also bear inscriptions in Latin, 
" Pray for the soul of James the father of William Swayne," and 
" Pray for the souls of William Swayne and Chrystian his wife." 
The two painted alabaster monuments to members of the Eyre 
family were removed from the choir, where the old family vault 
stood, and the beautiful ironwork and carved woodwork were 
placed here to enclose a new vault for the same family in 1724. 
The resolution of the vestry reads : — 



6 The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury. 

" Agreed that the Lord Chief Baron Eyre be allowed a sufficient 
quantity of ground at the east end of the south aisle for the erecting of 
a vault for himself and family with liberty to enclose the same." 

Sir Eobert Eyre's remains were placed here in 1735 and also 
the remains of his wife and his son, both of whom predeceased 
him. Many of his ancestors were buried in the choir, some of 
whom were wealthy woolstaplers and members of the guild, in- 
cluding Eobert Eyre, who was Mayor in 1558, and his son, Thomas 
Eyre, who filled the same office in 1587. 

The present porch opening into Swayne's aisle is a modern one, 
a reproduction of an old example at Bishopstone. The date when 
the nave aisles were added is uncertain, probably 1470 — 1490, but 
it is supposed that the work of building was continuous, though 
slow. It will be noticed that the line of the completed chancel 
aisles was continued, making the north side of the tower a part of 
the wall of the south aisle ; but as this brought the door and the 
two staircase lights of the tower and the two buttresses into the 
Church, the architect overcame this difficulty by blocking up the 
door and windows and making new ones outside, and by cutting 
away the buttresses on the north side. The roofs of these aisles 
were made to match the roofs of the chapels of Swayne and 
Godmanstone, and the pillars and arches in the nave, which were 
made to agree with those previously erected in the choir, replaced 
the walls and early windows which had hitherto lighted the nave. 

A little later, either at the end of the fifteenth or at the he- 
beginning of the sixteenth century, the clerestory, the great west 
window, and the beautiful carved Tudor roof, were added to the 
nave. This roof is of much the same date and style as the roof of 
the nave in St. Cuthbert's, Wells. The corbels which carried the 
beams of the old roof of the nave are still in position. After the 
new roof was completed, the remarkable " Doom" painting over 
the chancel arch was executed. The two large figures in this 
painting, sometimes alluded to as SS. James and Thomas-a-Becket, 
are more generally supposed to represent St. Osmond, who was 
canonized in 1457, and the pilgrim who caused the painting to be 
placed there to commemorate his safe return from a pilgrimage. 



By 0. Raskins. 7 

This picture was coated with whitewash in 1573; the church- 
wardens' accounts for this year show that Gussett was paid 22s. 
for washing the Church with lime, and that Adam Marbell was 
paid £2 13s. U. 

" for peyntinge and Gilting of ye Queries armes, and makinge ye com- 
maundementes at ye uper ende of ye quire." 

A few years later the accounts include a payment for the royal 
arms which are still in the Church, viz. : — 

" Roger Lovell makinge of the Quenes Armes .£8 1*. &d . and to 
Eeynold Beckham for ye frame for the Quenes Armes, and mendinge ye 
pulpet £4 6s. Oat." 

These arms were placed above the chancel arch and remained 
there until 1880, when they were removed to their present position, 
and the whitewash was carefully taken off the Doom Painting, 
when it was restored and a preparation put on the surface to 
preserve it. There seems little doubt but that the Church at one 
time presented a wealth of colour. When the south porch was 
cleaned in 1905, underneath several coats of whitewash paintings 
too dilapidated to be preserved were found. 

There was a porch on the north side of the nave, but in 1835, to 
save the expense of repairs, this was destroyed. There was a room 
above this porch. The staircase which led to this room remains, 
and is used at present as a means of getting on the roof of the 
north aisle. This room contained a fireplace, and by its side was 
discovered, on taking down the wall, a small niche which had been 
plastered over, in which were found pieces of pottery, including a 
crucible, supposed to have belonged to an alchymist. Mr. Doran 
Webb tells us that there was an anchorite who used to live in a 
chamber in St. Thomas' Cemetery, and he might have inhabited 
this room. 

The rood and the rood loft were taken down in 1559, and from 
the accounts it appears that the organ of those days stood on the 
great rood loft. In 1568 the churchwardens, Lyonel Tychborne 
and Giles Thorneburye received towards 

" Makynge of ye newe orgaynes and as appearth by a byll £7 . 13s. 5c/." 



8 The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury. 

The following year Hugh Chapsion, organ maker of South 
Molton, was paid £35 5s. Qd. for the new organ, which lasted until 
1738, when it was replaced by one costing £230. 

In the north window of the Godmanstone aisle there are frag- 
ments of the glass of a Late Decorated Jesse Window, and a few 
small fragments remain in the smaller tracery lights of the other 
north windows. The east window in this chapel was a figure and 
canopy window, and in each of the two outer lights there still 
remains the head of an original canopy in white and yellow glass. 

The coloured glass in this chapel is said to be of the latter part 
of the reign of Edward III. Some are of opinion that this chapel 
was used by the Mayor and Corporation, as the Guild of St. George, 
and that the figure of St. George was placed over the chapel screen 
in the same manner as the image of St. John the Baptist was kept 
in the Tailors' Chapel, except that, in the case of the Tailors' 
Chantry, the figure of their patron saint was placed on or above 
the altar, with a garland of roses upon the head, during the feast 
of St. John the Baptist. 

The accounts of Bichard Markes and Bobert Eyre, churchwardens 
1547-8, show payments to 

" Burges Johnson and Lytchfelde for rnakynge clean of the church 
after the departure of the vysytors xviijc?., and to ij carpenters and iij 
laborers for takynge downe of the George ij*. viijrf., for breakynge downe 
of the steles of the ymages in the churche xxijrf., and for the repair of 
the places where the ymages stood ij*. viijd." 

The fine altar tomb, of Burbeck marble, stood, at one time, 
beneath the central arch on the north side of the choir. This is 
said to have been the tomb of the founder of one of the two 
Godmanstone Chantries, which were in this Church. It bore 
originally two inlaid brass effigies, and a shield, together with 
the emblem of the Trinity, symbols of the four evangelists, and a 
marginal inscription ; presumably these brasses were stripped off 
the tomb when the ornaments of the Church were seized and sold, 
and much metal from tombs, &c, was disposed of as old brass. A 
merchant's mark carved on two sides of the tomb alone remains 
to help identify the original owner. The white marble slabs which 



By C. Haskins. 9 

have been inserted in the top of the old tomb and which record 

the names of Thomas Chafin, Esq., 1679, and Thomas Chafin 

Markes, Esq., 1727, lead one to suppose that when the first-named 

died in 1679, his grandson, Thomas Chafin Markes, appropriated 

this monument, and that it was used as a tomb for his grandfather 

and also for himself when he died in 1727, and although he had not 

the wit to take off the ancient merchant's mark, he left 10s. yearly 

for repairing the tomb for ever, "and that no other person should 

be buried in it." 

The old font, which is a plain bowl of Late Norman character, 

was restored to the Church from a neighbouring garden in 1895. 

This font is supposed to have been turned out of the Church in 

1647, and a small substitute provided, when the order was made 

that all fonts were to be taken down in Churches and placed near 

the minister's seat. The account of the churchwardens for 1647 

shows a payment for a board for the Parliament's declaration, &d. ; 

also : — 

" paid to J. Holloway for takeinge downe the fonte and laying the 
stones, 8*." 

After the restoration, viz., on May 18th, 1661, Humphrey 
Beckham was paid for moving the pulpit back to its old position 
and for a covering for a new font, £4 15s. 5d. 

The loose stonework is the remains of two carved figures which 
stood in the niches on the exterior wall of the south side of the 
tower and represented the Virgin and Child, and Thomas-a-Beckett. 

The old chests contain the registers from 1570, the church- 
wardens' accounts from 1545, and other old documents. 

The vestry, which is a building of three floors, is thought to be 
the house, or a portion of the house, which William Swayne built 
as a residence for his chantry priests in 1465 — 7, the erection of 
which resulted in ten years' litigation between the corporation 
and Bishop Beauchamp, and the imprisonment of the redoubtable 
mayor, John Halle, for disrespectful behaviour towards the king 
in council. The ceiling of the vestry room is original work, but 
the sides were new wainscoted in 1733 8ft. high, and the partition 
on the east side was added so as to form a small inner chamber. 



10 The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury. 

The minutes of the vestry show that at this time there was a step 

or small platform beneath the fifteenth century window, which is 

now within the small chamber (probably an oratory). This 

window is in three lights, and contains good remains of fifteenth 

century coloured glass : — St. Christopher and the divine infant, in 

the middle light; with St. Thomas of Canterbury carrying the 

Canterbury Cross and wearing an episcopal glove on his left hand 

and a ring on his right hand, in the light on the right hand side. 

The left hand light contains the head and shoulders of a figure, 

the remainder of which is lost ; the robe is of ermine — a symbol 

of majesty — the right hand is raised in blessing. There was a 

representation of Cod the Father in the east windows of both St. 

Edmund's and St. Thomas', and, as is generally known, Henry 

Sherfield, the Recorder, in Laud's time obtained leave to replace 

the figure in St. Edmund's Church by clear glass, but to show 

publicly his great hatred of idolatry he smashed the window with 

his staff, for which he was punished by the Star Chamber, and to 

prevent a possible scandal of the same kind at St. Thomas', Mr. 

Sub-Dean ordered the figure to be- removed from St. Thomas' east 

window. The churchwardens' accounts for 1583 include a payment 

of 4d. to 

" Hacker for puttinge oute the picture of the father in ye east windowe 
at Mr. Subdean's comrnaundment." 

In later days this fragment of glass was found, and placed in. 
this window, but passed as a representation of St. Osmund. When 
complete the figure was apparently a representation of the Trinity. 

The under chamber, which now contains the apparatus for heating 
the Church, was in the seventeenth century used as a skull-house. 
In 1687 the commissioners ordered it to be emptied and the bones 
buried. It is said that one of the old beams which were taken 
out of the skull-house bore an inscription which originally asked 
people to pray for the souls of William Swayne and his wife, but 
that in the time of James I. some loyalist painted out the names 
of Swayne and his wife and substituted that of the king, the 
painter, however, leaving in the word " souls," regardless of the 
fact that even a king has no more than one soul. 



By G. Hashins. 11 

The choir floor was raised and the seven steps from the nave to 
the altar were made about 1850 — 60, in Canon Kenaud's time. 
Mr. Street was the architect, and it was then that the choir was 
emptied of its high pews and the alabaster altarpiece and screen, 
&c, were added. 

The tomb of William Ludlow, butler to the three kings, Henry 
IV., V., and VI., stood in the choir until 1813, when, unfortunately, 
it was removed and broken to pieces. 

Under the third arch is the tomb with the brass still intact of 
" John Webbe, Mayor of the Citty," who died in 1570. 

The present pulpit displaced in 1877 an old carved wood one 
which had figures of angels round it and a sounding board above 
it ; a portion of this sounding board is in the south porch. In 
this porch are also placed the " Jacks " ; these disabled men-at-arms 
being out of working order and insecure, were taken down from 
their perches under the clock, beside the Ting Tangs, in 1896, and 
placed in this porch until such time as the churchwardens can 
find money to again put them in working order. According to an 
old manuscript book in the Free Library, " The Quarter Jackes 
were sette upp at St. Thomas' Church in 1582 Eobert Elliott 
Maior." The. "Ting Tangs" were cast by Wallis, Culver Street, 
Salisbury, in 1581, and " Thos ffeyld of Westburye for kepinge the 
chymes and Jackes " was paid 10s. in 1591. The Jacks are carved, 
in mail and open helmet, and with remarkably well cut faces: they 
stood out below the clock for over three hundred years, and pro- 
claimed the quarters and hours of the day. In one hand each of 
these figures originally had an iron hammer, but the hammer did 
not really strike the bell, although the figures used to swing round 
and apparently do so. 

In the same porch there is a memorial in carved wood to 
Humphrey Beckham, the carving representing events in the life 
of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. 

The memorial bears the following inscription : — 

" Here underlyeth the body of Humphrey Beckham who died the 2nd 
day of Feby anno 1671. Aged 83 Years." His own worke." 

This Humphry Beckham was elected a sidesman in St. Thomas 



12 The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, Salisbury. 

on April 18th, 1636, and his name frequently appears in the 
churchwardens' accounts as receiving money for carving and joinery 
work in the Church. He was chamberlain of the joiners' guild in 
1621, and warden in 1635. 

On the exterior of the south wall of Swayne's Aisle can be seen 
remains of the ancient south porch into this chapel, and on the 
buttress at the east end of Swayne's Chapel there is carved a 
crucifix of late fifteenth century date. 

The old bier-house, which in 1530 stood on the west side of the 
tower, was altered and made into a house for the sexton to dwell 
in in 1619. This house was destroyed early in the last century. 



13 



NOTES ON THE CHURCHES OF BOSCOMBE, LDMISTON, 

WINTERBORNE GUNNER, WINTERSLOW, FARLEY, 
PITTON, WEST GRIMSTEAD, and IVYCHURCH PRIORY. 

By C. E. Ponting, P.S.A. 

The Chukch of S. Andrew, Boscombe. 

Chancel and nave with wooden bell-cot on west gable, and north 
transept. 

The walls of the nave and chancel (other than the east wall) 
appear to be entirely fourteenth century work, and the windows 
(with the exception of the eighteenth century ones in the north and 
south walls of the chancel) to have been all square-headed; there 
remain unaltered in the following positions, two two-light on south 
and one on north of nave ; one three-light in the west wall of the 
nave and a similar one in the east wall of the chancel, but the latter 
has been changed to a pointed window, probably at the date cut 
over it — 1755, when the east wall was rebuilt, and brick courses 
were introduced into the plinth. 

The chancel has a priest's door in the south wall : the nave has 
a doorway in the south wall with semi-circular arch having a 
sundial cut on it ; there is also a small wooden window, probably 
introduced to light the pulpit. 

A transept of Elizabethan character was built out from the 
north side of the nave, possibly by Richard Hooker, who was 
rector from 1591 to 1595, and whose discourses doubtless attracted 
large congregations ; it has a four-centred doorway in the east 
wall and a five-light transomed window in the north gable ; it is 
open to the nave at its south end for the full width. 

The pulpit is of the period indicated by the record cut on it : — 
H. S. 1633 — I. D., and the block of four pews on the south of the 



14 The Church of All Saints, Idmiston. 

nave are probably coeval; it is doubtful whether the sounding- 
board belongs to the pulpit. 

The oblong music stand of deal with sloping top, round which 
the band used to stand within the memory of the oldest inhabi- 
tants, still exists in the Church. 

The chancel retains its original late fourteenth century tie-beam 
roof, plastered beneath. The roofs of the nave and transept, and 
the turret, are modern. 

The font is a circular bowl of early form, covered with plaster. 

The royal arms are those of Queen Victoria. 

The walls are built of flint, without buttresses, and the 
dressings are of green sandstone and Chilmark. The gables have 
no copings. 

A bell with the inscription : — 

ROB : FEEEMENT LCH : WARDN W M TOSIER 
stands on the floor of the north transept. 



The Church of All Saints, Idmiston. 

Chancel, nave with north and south aisles, north porch and 
western tower. 

This is quite the most interesting Church visited on the. 1908 
excursion, and it is remarkable for the unusual refinement and 
simple beauty of its work of the Decorated period, which is not 
well represented m the county. 

Starting with the earliest work, the first part to be noticed is 
what is left of the Norman western tower. The tower as it now 
stands has three arches opening into the aisles on the north and 
south and into the nave on the east and the aisles are carried 
through to the line of its western face, but it is doubtful whether 
there were north and south arches here originally, for there are 
flat pilaster buttresses at the angles, on the north and south sides 
(now in the aisles) as well as outside on the west, the only difference 
being that those on the inside are built of Chilmark and green 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 15 

sandstone in alternate bands, while those outside are of one kind 
of stone. The west wall has been largely rebuilt between the 
buttresses and three fragments of Norman work inserted, with 
examples of the bead mould of the period. 

The arches are all of two orders of chamfers, the outer order is 
carried round from the jambs, while the inner springs from moulded 
corbels ; the arch on the east side is coeval with the building of the 
aisles in the fourteenth century, but two Norman heads were re- 
used as corbels. The south arch appears to have been inserted at 
the same time but rebuilt since ; it has one Norman corbel and 
one with a distinctly Early English type of foliated carving. The 
north arch appears to be over a century later, one corbel having 
late Decorated foliated carving while the other is an angel corbel. 

The chancel is a plain one without buttresses, dating from the 
early half of the thirteenth century. It has two lancets in the 
south wall, two on the north, and a triple lancet window on the 
east, with coeval string-course under it on the inside ; the string 
below this again is modern, as also are the north door and the roof 
of the chancel, the roof of the nave, and the chancel arch. There 
is a piscina in the south wall of the sanctuary. 

The north and south aisles and the porch were erected in the 14th 
century, and the arcades are beautiful specimens of simple Deco- 
rated work. The pillars are of clustered form with moulded caps 
and bases, the arcades are of two orders of chamfers, the inner 
springing from corbels on the responds — one of these has the same 
kind of carving as that in the south arch of the tower. The aisles 
are of three bays, and there were formerly doorways in the central 
bays (that on the south has given place to a modern window) with 
a three-light square-headed window in each side bay ; a similar 
window occurs in the east end of the north aisle, while the one in 
the south aisle is pointed, and its apex has been cut into by the 
parapets. Square buttresses are used at the angles and to divide 
the bays on the south where there is no porch. 

The porch on the north is of two storeys, the lower having a 
four-centred doorway under a square head with a two-light square- 
headed window to light the priest's room over. This is approached 



16 The Church of All Saints, Idmiston. 

by an easy stair from the aisle and has its original roof. The 
nave clerestory has four two-light square-headed windows on each 
side and a plain parapet, a similar parapet is carried round the 
aisle and porch with excellent gargoyles in the cornice. The nave 
roof is modern. The roofs of the aisles are doubtless the original 
ones, although they are of a type usually found in Perpendicular 
work ; they have tie-beam principals, with braces beneath resting 
on stone corbels ; the principals and intermediates and purlins are 
well moulded and have carvings at the intersections. 

The carvings in this part of the Church are of a very high order ; 
the subjects of the roof corbels in the south aisle are as follows, 
commencing at the west end : — 

Female with graceful, waved, square head-dress. 

Female head, with wimple over the mouth. 

Three male heads, civilian. 

Four female heads. 

One angel with shield. 
In the north aisle (west end) : — 

Female head with wimple. 

Grotesque male head making a comic grimace. 

Nun telling her beads. 

Two bearded male heads. 

Male head biting his scarf. 

Two female heads with square head-dress. 

Two female heads with a kind of wimple. 
The roof stair went up from the south aisle through the respond ; 
no steps are left. There is a recess cut in the east respond of the 
aisle for use with the altar here ; a trefoil-headed piscina occurs 
in the respond of the north aisle. 

The font is a 14th century bowl of octagonal form on a stem 
and base, all of Purbeck marble. There is a good Carolian tomb 
at the west end of the south aisle, commemorating Giles Eowbacb 
who died December 2nd, 1633. 

The Church appears to have been restored in 1866-7. 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 17 



The Chuech of S. Mary, Winterbourne Gunner. 

Chancel, nave, with S. porch, and western tower. 

This charmingly-situated little Church, which arrests the eye of 
the traveller by the South Western main line, is of the simple 
type which exactly suits its position. 

The modern history of the parish has not been uneventful, for 
the story goes that well within living memory the chancel roof 
fell in, and that the Church was closed in consequence for fourteen 
years ! The present flat-ceiled roof cannot be said to be an 
extravagant way of getting out of the difficulty. 

The chief peculiarity in the building is that a south aisle once 
existed and has been pulled down, leaving intact the arcade of 
Transitional Norman work of two bays of pointed arches of one 
chamfered order, with simple impost moulding on the responds and 
octagonal central pillar with curious square capital. The new 
south wall of the nave with its two-light window was built outside 
of this, and a new roof put on over the old ; the latter is of the 
collared and braced-rafter type of the fourteenth century. The 
south door is an old one built into the modern wall. The chancel 
arch is of the same type as the south arcade. 

What remains of the old walls of the chancel (the north wall 
was " Eebuilt 1810,") appears to be fourteenth century work, and 
a single-light trefoil-headed window exists on the south of the 
sanctuary — a similar one existed farther west, but has been en- 
larged. 

The east window is modern. Traces of an early fresco (a hand) 
can be seen north of the chancel arch, and over it some decoration 
in black. A good deal of black letter exists over the arch and on 
the south wall. 

Built into the outside of the north wall of the nave is the head 
of a very early Norman window, which points to a Church here at 
that period ; this wall is a piece of modern rebuilding with a new 
window and buttress; an old buttress remains at the north-east 
VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. C 



18 The Church of All Saints, Winter sloiv. 

angle. The archway opening into the tower is a bold one of a 
single order of Perpendicular type.and the entire tower is probably 
of the fifteenth century — a two-light original window remains in 
the west of the belfry, and single lights in the north and south 
sides. The north door has a four-centred arch ; the three-light 
cusped west window is a post-Reformation one. 

The walls of the tower are without set-off or string-course from 
the ground to the roof ; the latter is a pyramidal one, starting at 
the level of the nave ridge. The whole building is built of flint, 
and has no gable copings. 



The Church of All Saints, Wintekslow. 

Chancel, nave with north and south aisle of four bays each, and 
tower forming the porch on the south. 

This Church was restored in 1851, until which time the nave 
was probably only two bays in length ; the western half was 
then added and much rebuilding of other parts of the Church 
took place. 

The old part of the nave consists of an arcade of two bays on 
each side ; the south arcade is early Norman work, having the 
central pier cruciform on plan and the responds corresponding. 
For capitals there is a simple impost moulding, and arches are semi- 
circular, having wide inner order and shallow outer, both plain, 
with square edges. The north arcade has a round pier and 
responds, the east respond being a deep one, with a modern 
opening cut through. The capitals have unusual mouldings, 
probably of the thirteenth century. The arches are pointed, and 
possess the same characteristic as those on the south, having a 
broad inner order, but both orders here are chamfered. 

The chancel arch follows the north arcade type — there are no 
labels to any of these arches. There are old windows at the west 
ends of the aisles ; that of the south being a square-headed one of 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 19 

the fifteenth century, and that of the north a pointed one about a 
century earlier. 

The font is a large Norman bowl 2ft. 6in. diameter and 2ft. 6in. 
high, of definite barrel shape. 

All the old work has been tooled and scraped almost beyond 
recognition. 

In the Devizes Museum is an undated lithograph of the east end 
of the nave, bearing the following description : — " On pulling down 
part of the Church at Winterslow, Wilts, for the purpose of restora- 
tion, the above curious painting was discovered on the west side of the 
chancel arch. The letters are painted in red ; the date is uncertain, 
but it is evidently very old." The drawing was made on stone 
by Col. Luard. It depicts a moulded beam — evidently the rood 
beam — across the end just over the chancel arch, and a plain one 
higher up at the level of the wall plates of the roof, probably put 
as a tie at a later period. Between these beams is painted a 
" Doom," sufficient of which is shewn to prove that it was carried 
right across ; on either side of the centre is an angel blowing a 
trumpet ; the centre would be occupied by the rood, probably of 
wood (what looks like a wood plug, to which the upper end was 
fixed appears in the print,) and the angels have their backs towards 
it ; on the south are the lost, one — a woman rising from the grave — 
is praying for mercy, and the rest, which include a crowned man, 
.are being driven to perdition by a Satan in the form of a man 
wearing a cap and having a zig-zag ornament across the body ; he 
is enveloped in flames. On the north, only one figure is shewn 
(the rest not having been uncovered), and this the upper part of 
a, man rising from the ground. When the painting was hidden 
from view by whitewash, the surface was powdered by the sacred 
monogram of sixteenth century type, in red; this was doubtless 
intended (like the black-letter texts so frequently met with) to 
compensate for the loss of the picture and to appease those who 
would regret the absence of decoration. 



20 The Church of All Saints, Farley. 



The Church of All Saints, Farley. 

It comes as a surprise in making a round of typical English 
village Churches to come upon one designed and built entirely in 
the Italian Eenaissance style and, for its size, as dignified and 
monumental as S. Paul's Cathedral. But, if this Church appears 
to be somewhat of an exotic, the generous scale on which it has 
been carried out and the purity of its details must appeal to the 
most unsympathetic, and much more to the ever-increasing number 
of those who look with favour on the work of the architects of the 
Renaissance. 

The Church was built in 1688 by Sir Stephen Fox; this was 
during the rebuilding of S. Paul's, and it is impossible to dissociate 
this Church from the greater building, although the personality of 
the architect does not appear to be known. 

The plan of the Church is one of complete symmetry, but not 
of the cruciform type which has the nave for its longest arm, for 
here we have nave with transepts projecting midway from its- 
north and south sides, chancel, and west tower. The south transept 
forms the main entrance with its door in the middle, and the north 
transept is a chapel, in the vault below which are buried many de- 
scendants of the founder. The Chapel is now used for the alms- 
houses. 

The materials of the walls are brick with stone dressings, rusti- 
cated quoins, and window architraves. There are no parapets 
excepting to the tower ; in other places a stone moulded eaves 
course is carried round, including the east end, for the roofs of 
both nave and aisles are hipped and not gabled. The ceilings of 
the nave and chancel are plastered barrel vaulted, returned at the 
ends ; those to the transepts and tower are flat. 

The chancel screen is a fine one of oak with turned balusters, 
the design being continued through the doors. The transepts hac 
similar screens, but that on the south has unfortunately been cut 



By C. E. Ponting, F.S.A. 21 

and altered to form a vestry. The pews have panelled ends and 
i backs, and the seats themselves are nicely designed, and have little 
i turned legs inside the ends. The walls of the nave have a panelled 
•dado, and this was doubtless continued around the chancel at a 
higher level. Unfortunately the chancel underwent a severe 
restoration in 1874, when the present altarpiece of stone and 
alabaster took the place of the old one of oak, and the present 
pavements of the chancel and chapel were laid. The present choir 
stalls appear to have been made up of the old pews and fitted 
with new ends ; the altar rails are modern. The sounding board 
of the pulpit was at the same time destroyed. 

The font is a vase of Portland stone, and possesses a character- 
istic oak cover with eight scrolls around a centre post. 

There is a hatchment of Lady Holland, daughter of the Duke 
of Kichmond, and granddaughter of Charles II. 

On the opposite side of the road are the Almshouses, six on each 
side of a central block, consisting of the Wardenry and Hall. The 
whole is designed in a very simple homely style and built of brick 
with tiled roofs, the ornamentation being reserved for the interior. 

The interior of the Wardenry is charming. The hall until 
recently retained its dais at one end, but the floor has now been 
reduced to one level. The wall panelling and fireplace are very 
good. The staircase is remarkable for the thickness of its handrail 
compared with the thickness of its balusters. 

The drawing-room is most striking ; it has a fine plaster ceiling 
in which are shields charged as follows : — 

1. Three boars' heads, couped, erased. 

2. A chevron between three flames, proper. 

3. Az. three roses. 

4. The arms of Fox. 
There is a portrait of Sir Francis Fox over the fireplace. 
This outline description does bare justice to a group of buildings 

which are only outraged by a flying visit of less than half-an-hour. 



22 The Church of St. John, West Ghrimstead. 



The Church of S. Peter, Pitton (a Chapelry of Parley) . 

Chancel, nave, north aisle of three bays, a low tower as porch 
on the south, and vestry on north. 

The Church has been rebuilt within recent times, several old 
features of considerable interest and of green sandstone have, how- 
ever, been re-used. The first of these to be noticed is the very 
curious shouldered pointed arch of the south doorway which dates 
probably from the 14th century. The inner doorway is a plain 
late Norman one with roll label. 

In the west wall of the nave is a three-light early Decorated 
window, the mullions following the line of the arch and intersecting 
in the tracery. In the chancel is a credence formed of a Norman 
capital, also an old piscina bowl built into the sill of the south 
window of the sanctuary. 

The font has a late Norman bowl with double cable pattern 
band carried round. 

There is, in the chancel, a good memorial brass to EdwardZouche, 
1580. 

The east window has glass typical of Kempe at his best. 



The Church of S. John, West Grimstead. 

Chancel, nave, north and south aisles, and west tower. 

This modest-looking little Church is well worthy of careful in- 
spection. With the exception of the modern brick tower at the 
west end of the nave, the walls are of flint, intermixed with tiles 
in some parts and with dressings of Chilmark and green sand- 
stone ; there is no buttress to any part of the building. The roof 
of the nave is continued down over the aisles without a break — 
the eaves on the south coming to within 6ft. of the ground. 

The oldest work is the arcade of the north aisle — this being, as 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 23 

is often the case, the side on which the first extension of the 
building took place. This arcade is of two bays of thirteenth 
century pointed arches of two orders of chamfers, the voussoirs 
being of Chilmark and brown sandstone alternately ; the central 
pillar is a round one with moulded cap and base, and the responds 
are demi-columns of the same kind. The aisle is continued as a 
chapel along the north of the chancel, with an arch of the same 
period between the two, this being of a wider span than the nave 
arches, and therefore semicircular. In the full length of this north 
wall there is only one old window — a two-light square-headed one 
J of early in the fifteenth century ; a similar window exists in the 
west wall ; the one in the east wall of the chapel portion is modern. 
There is also a modern window which takes the place of a former 
north doorway. 

The south aisle has only one arch, opposite the east bay of the 
north arcade, but later in style — fourteenth century, with moulded 
caps and bases to the jambs. The remainder of the aisle is divided 
from the nave by a solid wall, with a modern-looking opening in 
it serving as a doorway. In the south wall opposite the latter is 
a modern window, which, like that in the north aisle, occupies the 
position of an old doorway — there were, therefore, north and south 
doorways to the western part of the Church, and the absence of a 
second arch on the south of the nave seems to point to an inner 
porch, or probably a tower, to the south aisle. There are two very 
small windows, with square heads, in the south wall and a modern- 
looking one in the east. The chancel arch is a simple one of 
probably the fourteenth century — two orders of chamfers carried 
down the jambs ; the east window, of three lights, is of the same 
period. The two south windows of the chancel are modern. An 
old doorway has been used in the modern tower. 

The nave and aisles retain their old roofs of probably the 
fourteenth century, the principals being curiously shaped to flat- 
cusped form which considerably reduces their strength. The nave 
roof has tie-beams with good braces beneath, coming low down 
into the spandrel of the arcade. 

There is a fourteenth century piscina with label, in the chancel. 



24 Ivy Church Priory. 

The font is a plain bowl, the short stem of which is an addition to 
the original design. The pulpit is a late Jacobean one with carved 
panels, the shelf supported by bird-shaped brackets. 

The royal arms at the west end, are those of Queen Anne, with 
the motto " Semper eadem." 

In the churchyard, westward of the tower, is a coped tombstone 
having the three upper arms of a cross with large fleur-de-lys 
terminals, and no stem. 



Ivy Church Priory. 

This is described and illustrated in Wiltshire Notes and Queries 
for March, 1893, by Mr. D. E. Warry, but elsewhere I have not 
met with more than a brief note, nor any account of the buildings 
of the Priory beyond that in the note below. 1 The house appears 
to have been founded by King Stephen for a prior and thirteen 
canons, and most of the architectural features which remain are 
of this period. The Priory held lands in the parish of Swindon. 

At the Dissolution the Priory buildings came to the Dean and 
Chapter of Salisbury who subsequently leased the property to 
Henry, Earl of Pembroke, and at the beginning of last century it 
was purchased by Earl Radnor. After this the buildings were 
converted into a school, at which Professor Pawcett, amongst 
others, was educated, and unfortunately they were pulled down, 
with the exception of the part of the Church which remains, in 
1888, when some of the oak timbers of the refectory roof were 
given to the Eector of Pewsey, and erected over the vestry and 
organ chamber which I designed for his Church (would that I had 

'See Wilts Arch. Mag., xxviii., 312, where in the report of the Boyal 
Commissioners appointed to enquire into the lesser Wiltshire monasteries it 
is stated that " the Priory of Ederos, alias Ivychurch " is " a hedde house of 
chanons of Seint Augustyne's rule ; the church whereof is the parish church 
to the inhabitants there of Whaddon and the forest of Claringdon." " Church, 
mansion, and oute houses in very good state, with inoche newe buylding of 
stone and brelce. Leade and belles none but oonely upon the church and in 
the stepell of the parish." 



By C. E. Pouting, F.S.A. 25 

known how many other beautiful fragments then became so much 
lumber !) 

All traces of the plan of the house seem to have been destroyed. 
The original Church had a north aisle, and one complete round 
pillar and one respond of the arcade, with parts- of two arches, 
remain. The scalloped capitals and the chamfered arches of two 
orders, as well as the base mouldings, all point to the latter half 
of the twelfth century. In the walls of a cottage which seems to 
have been built of the stones of the demolished buildings, several 
fragments of great interest have been inserted, among which are : — 

(1) A traceried panel which looks like the front of a fourteenth 

century tomb. 

(2) Several caps belonging to pairs of shafts 6in. in diameter, 

which were spaced 5 J in. apart, and which apparently 
formed part of the cloister ; as they are worked all round 
they could hardly have been intended for wall arcading 
The ornamentation of the caps is varied and most in- 
teresting, scalloped caps having scrolls and other elabora- 
tion ; another has a beaded moulding carried round under 
the abacus and continued down each cap in zig-zag form ; 
in another the capitals are arcaded, the arches being 
occupied by figures — bishops, Blessed Virgin Mary and 
Child, &c. 

(3) A figure of S. Peter vested in mitre, alb, chasuble, maniple, 

stole and pallium, holding the keys in his right hand and 
a staff in the left. 

(4) Another figure in flowing garments, writing in a book. 

(5) Under the eaves is a capital with an interesting instance 

of the evolution of the volute. 

(6) Part of a fourteenth century panel. 

In the garden wall are portions of capitals and the fragment of 
an Agnus Dei. At the back of the cottage there is a stack of 
worked stones, including many beautiful capitals which seem to 
be in danger of being destroyed by the action of the weather, even 
if they escape being carried away, and it is much to be desired 
that they should be better preserved. The present owner has 



26 The Green Dragon Inn, Alderbury. 

wisely worked four of the capitals into the new drinking fountain 
erected in the village. The materials here appear to be Chilmark, 
Doulting, and Bath freestone, used indiscriminately. 



The Green Dragon Inn, Alderbury. 

Part of the house now the " Green Dragon " Inn is of great 
interest. Outside is a good half-timbered gable. Inside is one 
large room (now divided) separated from the passage by an oak 
doorway. The room has a fine ceiling of moulded beams, and 
contains a stone fireplace said to have been brought from the 
Priory, although it suits its present position extremely well. It 
is of fifteenth century type, with ogee arch beautifully crocketted 
and with bold roses 10 inches in diameter in the spandrels. Above 
is a moulded shelf with shields, the central one charged with the 
arms of England and France Quarterly ; on either side are other 
shields, one on a cross Jive annulets, the other a fess betiveen three 
dogs' heads collared, erased. There is also the iron gearing of the 
spit in situ. 

Hoare, Modern Wilts, V., p. 6, says : — 

" In a small public-house in the village is a large and curious chimney 
piece decorated with shields of arms, &c, which probably once belonged 
to the adjacent Priory. It measures 7 feet by 2 feet 8 inches, and is 
carved out of one solid block of Portland stone." 

As to Ivychurch (Modern Wills, V., p. 187) he says : — 

" The conventual buildings of Ivy Church have entirely disappeared, 
and its site is occupied by a modern house which belongs to the Earl of 
Eadnor. In the house are two little statues." A plate of the two statues 
and the Green Dragon fireplace is given. 



27 



WINTEKSLOW CHUBCH KECKONIffGS, 

1542—1661. 

By the Kev. "W. Symonds. 

Commencing 33 Henry VII L the Winterslow reckonings afford 
great variety of interest. The wardens of " Al Seyntes p'yssche 
churche " include among " recyttes " the profits of Whitsun-ales, 
Cock-shies at Easter, and May-day sports, the hire and sale of 
bullocks and sheep with their skins, fleeces, and wool; fees for 
burials in the Church and for bell ringing, knells, &c. ; gifts and 
bequests in kind and money ; the sale of goods, chips, old bell 
ropes, &c. (including much spoil of Church goods, temp. Edw. VI. 
and Elizabeth). Among their " chargis " and " layynges forthe for 
the churche " are, roof shingles (home-made), repair and furniture 
of bells, glazing windows ; ritual accessories, and elements for Holy 
Communion, and, till 1558, oil and tapers; washing "y e churche 
geyre " ; repair of " setys " and other furniture ; making y' churche 
boke," register books and transcripts ; Cathedral dues, Smoke 
farthings, visitation fees and dinners, bills of presentment, &c ; 
and (from about 1620) Gaol and Marshalsea money, and contri- 
butions to travellers, mainly Irish people, but including "a frinch 
prist." 

The writing of volume I. is excellent, the parchment fine, the 
ink clear, and the figures well formed. It deteriorates towards 
the close. The entries for 1612 — 14 are now missing, they would 
naturally occur between the pages now numbered 148 and 149. 

Until 1602 the reckoning was made in the autumn near the 
time of the patronal festival of All Saints. 

I. — Dealings with Live Stock. 

The wardens, being destitute of any fabric fund in land or house 
property, occasionally received gifts and legacies of sheep and 



28 Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 

bullocks, and occasionally purchased sheep, making their hire and 
sale, and the sale of their skins or fleeces a source of profit. This 
must have given them much trouble. The practice declined after 
the close of the sixteenth century. Here are a few specimens of 
such entries : — 

p. 1. 1542. E' of Eoberd Webe for a cow . . . 
R' of Thorn's vyncent for a cow 

hyre xvj d 

R' for a calv's skyn ij a 

R' for a bolocks skyn iiij d 

R' for ij kebbs soldo ij s xj a 

p. 3. 1543. to the p'son for the tethyng of a calfe iiij d 
to lake for wy[n]teryng of on ew shepe v d 

p. 5. Receyvyd for iiij calvs xij s iij d 

R' for a cow sold xiiij s 

R' for a shepe sold ij s viij d 

p. 8. 1544. Receyvyd for xx li u of wooll of thys yer' 

shorne at mydsom r last past X s 

R' for a shepe skyn sold ij a 

p. 9. for tethyng of the lams ■ iij J 

p. 11. 1546. for the someryng of a cow 

that was sold at lamas feyre . . . 
for caryage of the cow to lamas feyre vj a 
for the lese of ij wethers to W m vyncent vj a 
for getheryng the shepe to gether iiij d 
R' for on ew sold at my[c]helmas feyre, ij 5 iiij d 
R' of John Ockeborne for the hyre of iiij kyne at 

ij* iiij d the cow hyre by the yere vij* 

I' going to wylton fayer iiij d 

receyved of thomas payne for a flyys of woolle xvj a 

for tow olde ews vij s iiij a 

for ten pownd of woulle vij s vj a 

too teggs sold for xij d of money and one ewe. 

It' that margaret strugnel hath in her kepyng on ewe 

geven and bequested by her husband edward strugnel 
It' that there ys also xx ewys in the kepyng of nycholas 

story of salsbery payeng for them yerly x s 

p. 105. 1584. It' y t is agreed by the consent of the whole p'yche that the new 
churche wardens shall w l the church stocke bye a skore 
of ewes by the feast of S' mychell next 

p. 137. [?1607] Receved of Jhon best for iij ship for two yeres ij s 

p. 157. 1616. The stock remayneing to the Church is fower sheepe & ij yeere 
(? ewes) in the hands of W m Beste & John Best & they doe 
paie iiij d a yeere for evre sheepe by the yeare & W m Beste 
hathe paid for this yeare & John is behind. 



p. 12. 




p. 13. 




p. 18. 


1549. 


p. 28. 


1555. 


p. 29. 


1556. 


p. 31, 




p. 59. 


1567. 


p. 66. 


1569. 



By the Rev. W. Symonds. 29 

II. — Church- Ales. 

The Church-ale at Winterslow was called the "Kyng-ale," the 

Church-house, where it was held, the "Kyng-house." 

p. 83. 1575-6. It' payed to hugh pryce for 

rnakynge cleane the Kyng house ix d 

It is once only referred to as the " Church-ale " : — 
p. 43. 1562. The chardges for the church ale 

There are traces of special officers : — 

p. 17. 1548. Keceytes 

K' of Gyles thistelthaw'te^ 

& John benet white > iiij d 
inu'dayes stuardes j 

p. 141. 1610. The stewards chosen by 
the p'ishe the xv th 
daie of Aprill 1610 for the 
collecting & gathering of the 
monie towards the White 
mundaies Dinner & such 
other uses as shalbe thoughte 
fitt& in such mann' & order 
as shalbe Agreed uppon by 
the whole p'ish sett Downe 
in writting under their 
hands 

Will'm Grenewood 

Thomas Man 

The earliest " ales " here recorded were on a very humble scale 
with correspondingly small profits. In 1542, 1543, and 1544-5 
there is no trace of any other provision than ale and music, as for 
instance : — 

p. 1. 1542. It'm freye clere by the kynge ale the 
yere above sayd xxiij s 



p. 2. It'm a vyrkyn of bere xi d 

It'm to the mynstrell viij d 

It'm for saforne to the kynge ale ij d 

p. 5. 1543. It'm gaynyd clere for the 

churche at the kynge ale xiij" 

p. 8. In 1544-5 only 15s. Ad. was gained. A bushel of malt that 



30 Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 

remained unused was sold for \2d. In 1546 the wardens 
supported the kyng-ale in the neighbouring parish of 
p. 12. Dean to the extent of 2d. Their own ale produced 
p. 13. 16s. 2d. During the reign of Edward VI. the custom 
seems to have fallen into abeyance, but in 1553 a sub- 
stantial dinner made it more profitable: — 

p. 25. 1553. It'm for the kyng ale xliij 8 viij d [a clear receipt] 

chargis 

It'm for a cauffe iij s ij d 

It'm for a shepe iiij s vj d 



It'm wheat & malt 
It'm for chese 



It' for q"z mutton xiiij" 

It' spyces vij d ob. 

It' for bruing viij d 

p. 27. In 1555 the profit was 53s. 2d., when there was provided 

p. 28. wheat, malt, a sheep, a calf, a loin of mutton, another of 
veal, half a sheep, cheese, butter, spices, and flour, " wood 
to bake & brue " ; and the " mynstrell " received 2s. 8d. 

p. 29. The profits continue to increase, in 1556 £3 15s., when for 
the first time "y e besome uppon Wytmonday" is men- 
tioned as costing 6d. Later we have : — 

p. 31. 1557. It' for y e mynstrell & for the besome xiij a . 

Anys Harding seems to have been the cook on these 

occasions. She only had 2d. in 1556, but at the "Kyng- 

kale " of 1557 she was raised to 12d. when the profit was 

p. 36. £3 17s. 9d. In 1559 £3 19s. 9d. was made, in 1561 

p. 40. £4 17s. 10d., and the wardens spent 4s. 6d. at the kyng- 

p. 43. ale in the neighbouring parish of Boscombe. In 1562 the 

principle of association was successfully adopted with 

other parishes with a clear profit of £6 17s. 2d., including 

Idmiston 41s. 2d., East Titherley 20s., Farley 26s. 8d., 

West Titherley 15s., East Dean 5s., Winterslow 26s. 2d. 

besides 3s. 2d. " receyved after." 

p. 45. In 1563 " morys-gere " was hired as an additional attraction 

p. 46-7. when £3 17s. 2d. resulted, the poor "coke " only getting 2d., 

and the wardens spent 3s. lOd. at " tetherly kyng alle." 






By the Rev. W. Symonds. 31 

p. 49. In 1564 7s. Qd. was spent at " Winterborne kynkale" and 

p. 51. 2s. at "Pytton kyngale," while £6 10s. 3d. was netted for 
Winterslow, of which Idmiston gave 30s., Dean 30s., 
Winterborn 26s. 8d., Grimstead llsAd., Farley and Pitton 
15s. Qd., " ij of salsbery ijs.," and Winterslow 14s. 9d. 

p. 55—57. " hire of the vessel xijd." is a feature in the charges for 
1566, when £4 2s. 9d. was made, to which Grimstead 
contributed 7s. 2d., Idmiston 36s. 5d., and Winterslow 
37s. 9d., besides Is. from Giles Thistlethwayte and bd. 
from " mestres purdei." 

p. 63—5. The "kyng-alle " of 1568 brought a profit of £6 0s. 8d., 
when the charges included " otemele vd.," " thre pound 
of candles ixd., " a payre cords iijd.," " the heyre of too 
garnys of vessell x\jd.," "for the [?vynnters] ijs.," besides 
a sum of 6d. " payed to a woman to help us." 

p. 67. In the same year there was " layd out at tetherly kyngale 
ijs. \jd." 

p. 69. In 1569 £3 lis. M., and in 1572 £7 19s. 2d. are the profits, 
but the charges are not entered. 

p. 75—7. £3 12s. resulted from a similar feast in 1573, of which 
"meddle wynterborne " gave 15s., " Wynterborne" Ss.lOd. 
" our owne paryche and other straungers 48s. 2d.," morys 
dancing and minstrells being among the attractions. 
p. 78. In 1574 there was " layd out at boscome & at Wynterborne 

p. 79. xvjd.," while at Winterslow besides the " mynstrell " & 
the " morys gere," a drum-player was engaged for 2s. 8d., 
and another item of interest is " Spencer the taberer too 

p. 80. dayes vjs. viijd.," the profits amounting to £5 17s. 6d., of 
which Boscombe gave 21s. 2d., Idmiston, 34s. 6d., Winter- 
bourn, 20s., " kepers of the parke (Clarendon) " 6s. 3d., 
Pitton and Farley, 4s. 5d., Salisbury, 2s. 6d., and "wyn- 
terstlo " 28s. 8d. 
The following is a literal transcript of the items for 1575 : — 

p. 83. 1575 Costs for the Kyngale 



It* for a lood of wod 

It' for the caryage of a lood of wod 



32 Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 



from buckold & for caryage of 

hedgwod owt of m r gylls drove 1 

XVJjjd 

It' for fellyng and haulyng of the 

same wode iij d 

It' payed to the mynsterells for may 

day iij s 

It' for half a quarter of mault 

v s vj d 

It' for foure buschells of wheat and 

a pecke xij s j d 

It' for a calffe x s 

It' for tooscheppe xij s vj a 

It' for a quarter of muttun 

xvij d 

It' for peper & safron xj d 

It' for otmeell & salt vj d 

It' for corants & Resons xvii d 



It' payed to the mynstrells for 
wytsonday & trynytye sonday 

ix s 

payed to the drum player iij s x d 

It' payed for a garnysch of vessell 

x a 

It' payed to hugh pryce for 
makyng cleane the Kynghouse ix d 

It' for chesse ij s vj d 

It' for hoppes & butter xiiij d 

It' for vynyger iij d 

It' payed to the mynstrells 

at wynterborne ij 5 

sm iij u x s ix d 



p. 84. R' at the kyngale of the 

paryche of wynterstlo 

xliiij' x d 

R' of wynterborne xxiij* 

R' of porton xxj 8 

R' of edmuston xiij s ij d 

R' of Boscome vj s viij d 

R' of the parj'ch of deane 



R' of salsbery men 

R' for too schepe skynnes 



1 Mr. Gyles Thistlethwayte. 



By the Rev. W. Symonds. 33 

R' of more straungers 



E' of alyxsander Webe 
for throwyng at kokes 



ob 



sm vj u v d ob 

The particulars of other ales are entered for the years 1577, 1579, 
1580, 1584, 1589, 1590, 1592, and 1598, on pages 89, 91-2, 95-6, 
107, 114—16, 127-8. The last but one recorded ale, in 1598, was 
on quite a large scale, so that there was paid " To the Coulee ij s to 
marye Hewlett — xijV and among the expenses we find "for our 
Coopes — iij d -" The total takings amounted to £13 Is. 2d. The 
first church rate was collected in the year 1600 (p. 131), at 14c?. a 
yardland, which seems to have extinguished the custom of holding 
church ales in Winterslow, and thereafter, except for the election 
of "White mu[n]daies Stewards" in 1610 (p. 141), we read only 
once more of the merry meal with its former attractions, the 
minstrels, the drum player, or the taberer, viz., in 1602 (p. 135), 
" Gayned clearlie by the kingale — vij" — vij d -" 

III. — Bequests and Gifts. 

p. 5. 1543. a schepe whyche Jon batt's wyfe gafe to the Churche xx* 

p. 6. 1544. Will'm Webe when so ev' the Churche end sehalbe new 

repayryd iij s iiij d 

p. 7. 1545. R'' of John a Nashe for hys gyft to the Churche . xij d 



p. 8. „ R' of Will'm more for a Cow that was hys fathers bequest 



p. „ ,, Robert benetts wyfe for hys gyft to the Churche 



p. 13. 1546. R' of John Jamys for hys wyvys gyft to the Churche xij d 

p. 15. 1547. Receyvyd of John Arnold for a shepe that was hys wyvys 

gyft xx d 

p, „ ,, R' of Alexand r bassat for a shepe that hys father gave to the 

Churche xvj d 

p. 23. 1552. of John Arnold's bequest ■ iiij d 

p. 27. 1555. the bequest of mother ffrye 



p. 39, 41. 1561. the bequest of Rychard payne iij" iiij d 

p. 65. 1568. one ewe that Jhone strugnell of pytton dyd gyve to the church 



p. 77. 1573. R' of gylles yngram that his mother dyd gyve vj d 

p. 86. 1576. R' of elyzabeth hayse one ewe scheppe geven by her husband 
wyllyam hayse & in the hands of mychaell newman payyng 
by the yere vj d 

OL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. D 



34 Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 
E' of Bobard Arnold geve[n] by his mother 



p. 


92. 


1580. 


p. 


112. 


1587. 


p- 


114. 


1589. 


p- 


115. 


)1 


p- 


117. 


1593. 


p- 


)> 


JJ 


p- 


125. 


1596. 


P' 


)» 


)» 


P- 


)) 


JJ 


p- 


M 


JJ 


p- 


J) 


M 


p- 


129. 


1599. 


p- 


131. 


1600. 


p- 


») 


JJ 


p- 


135. 


1602. 


p- 


138. 


1608. 


p- 


)) 


„ 


p- 


143. 


1610. 


p- 


J) 


JJ 


p- 


») 


JJ 


p- 


)> 


M 


p- 


)) 


>) 


p- 


145-6. 161 


p- 


146. 


1611. 


p- 


5) 


)» 


p- 


148. 


1612. 


p- 


149. 


1615. 


p- 


162. 


1619. 



of Jhon benet . . . y' hys father dyd geeve xij' 1 

Eichard Walter gave unto the Churche xij d 

Eobert Paine gave unto the Churche xij' 1 

Item geven by russell vj 5 viij d 

I. geven by John webbe- 



Eeceived of Eobert Stanbe vj d ) to the maintinance of the 
,, ,, Will luam Joneis vj a f greate bell 

I'm margery chakrete gave to the church xvj d 

I'm John Whit gave to the church '■ -iiij d 

It'm Alse prouten gave to the church iiij d 



Inprimis of Christofer Still his gifte vj s 

geven by Margaret Newman 

geven by Agnes Paine ■ 

It'm of rn r Eobert Stanesbe 



Eeceyved iij s gyven to the Churche by Lawrence hayes deceased 

of thomas manthel his sister gave to the church xij d 

Eeceaved vj 3 viij d given to the Church by Eowland Weste 
Eeceaved xij d given to the Church by Eob'te Lake 
Eeceaved xij d given to the Church by Henry Greate 
Eeceaved vj d given to the Church by Eob'te Arnole 
iij s iiij d given to the Churche by Walter Baffe Deceased 
l. 1 

given to the Church by Phillip Keante iij s iiij d 

It' marie Baugh ij d 

given by Alex : Thistlethwayte Esqr at the accompt to the 

Church V s iiij' 1 

Geven by John Baugh iiij d 

Eeseved of Margre web tulpence [? 12 d ] that her husband gave 
to the curce 
p. 172. 1621. Eeceved of Giles Greenwoode w ch his father gave to the 

Church iij s 

p. 176. 1624. It' of Stephen Halle given by his mother's will to the Church ij 3 

p. 230. 1640. rec' of Henry Dench a legacve of Mary Walter I s 6 d 

p. ,, ,, a legacye \_of Alexander Thistl ethwayte] 3 s 4 d 

p. 249. Mr. Allexander Thistlethwayte Esq (windows) 5 s . o. 

p. 260. 1657. ^£20 given to the poor " by M r Mumpessons " 

After the institution of the church rate there grew up a custom 
of contributing special offerings for the elements of bread and wine 
used at the Holy Communion : — 

p. 142. 1610. Bee' of the Conmnicants of Weston j 3 ij d 

Bee' of the Comunicants in midleton & Easton vij s j d 

! For the special gifts in connection with the Holy Communion see below. 



By the Rev. W. Symonds. 35 

p. 145. 1611. Imprimis received of Sir Hinrie St Barbe and M r Zouche 
for receiving the Comunion the first Sundayes of August 

the first of September & the first of October xviij d 

It' received of m r Nicholas Eley the vj tk dav of October given 

toward the monthlie comunions iij s 

3. „ „ It* received of m r Nicholas Eleye given toward the monthlie 

communions ij 1 

It' received fo[r] 155 Comunicants xiij* 

Bee' of rn r Elie to bie wine vj* viij d 

ffor the Comunicants in "Weston ■ vj* v d 

for the Comunicants in midleton & Easton v a viij d 

Bee' of the widowe Baffe towardes bread & wine iiij d 

It'm rec' of m r Parson Elye for bread & wyne at two sev'all 
tymes iiij 3 ix d 

A gift of Wm. Best towards Good Friday bread occurs: — 

p. 191. 1630. Beceved of William Best for good friday bread viij d 

3. 194. 1631. Bee' of Wm Best towards the dole bread given on good ffriday 

— vii j d 

3. 221. 1637. Beceived of William best for good friday bread viij d 



146. 
149. 


1615. 


)» 


» 


158. 
185. 


1617. 
1628. 



Payments for this purpose were made every year by the wardens, 
is: — 

>. 3, 1543. It' for bred on good fryday xiiij d 

>ut the usual amount was 22d. 

[William Best of Farley eventually left a wether sheep worth 
3s. 4fZ. towards the dole, and this sheep was exchanged by Mr. 
"ohn Ely for a rent charge of 8d. a year in 1728, the evidences 
f which are still preserved in the parish chest.] 

Several special gifts towards the bells will be found later under 
he heading of Bells. 



IV. — Clergy, Services, and their adjuncts. 

The references to clergy are not numerous, apart from the pay- 
ment of tithes on cattle to the parson (unnamed), and of fees at 
fie visitations of unnamed bishops and archdeacons. The Bectors 
I Winterslow are not mentioned by name until the time of Bev. 
ficholas Ely, Bector 1608—1634. 

D 2 



36 Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 

p. 19. 1549. It'm payed for the Bedemyng of the Chalyce whyche ff[ather] 
peter conveyed beynge Curat of Wynt'slew xxxiij' iiij d 

p. 20. 1550. It'rn for wrytyng of certeyn bills, to ff [ather] myghell [Michael] 
iiijd 

p. 22. 1551. 'In p'm's payed to Ric' hollond to the use of ff [ather] Chaundeler 
for Whytson mony iij s iiij d 

p. 25. 1553. It' to ff[ather] beckwyth j a 

p. 80. 1556. It' y' ff [ather] Eychard had for wrytyng & makyng of the 
church boke viij d 

Mention has already been made of the annual gifts of Eev. 
Nicholas Elye which are entered 1610—1632 (pp. 145—199). The 
name of (Eev.) John Carter first occurs 1656 (p. 259). In April 
1659 he is entered as " John Carter, Eectour " (p. 261). He was j 
not instituted till 1661. 

The following entries refer to Church services and accessories : — 

p. 1. 1542. It'm E' of Eoberd "Web . . . makyng of the trendyllxij . . 

p. 2. ,, layd owt for the trendyll ; ij s iij d 

„ ,, It'm payed for a quart of oyle & a glase vj d l 

,, ,, It'm for dyryge & mase v d I 

,, ,, It'm for lampe oyle ix d 

„ „ It'm for John payn's dirj'ge of mydylton iiij 8 . ix d 

,, ,, It'm for lyght to lyght the candls j d 

,, ,, It'm payyd to pry nee for makyng of all the churche lyghtsvij 9 iij d J 

p. 3. 1543. a quart of lampe oyle v d 

p. 4. ,, for vocy's lyght ij d 

,, ,, to thorn's prynce for makyng of ye Churche lyghts vj 3 j4 

,, ,, a quart of lampe oyle v d < 

„ ,, for the hole chargs of the dyrgs [? v$ ] vd J 

p. 9. 1544-5. a quart of oyle agaynst Crystemas vj 4 

,, ,, payyd to the byshop for haloyng of ij kerchyffs ■ viij d | 

,, ,, a quart of oyle v d obi 

,, „ to thorn's prynce for makyng of the Churche lyghts . . J 

„ „ quart of oyle agaynst mychelm 8 last vj d 



p. 10. [? 1545]. ij bz of malt for John payns durgs ij' 

,, ,, ij bz of whet for John payns durgs iiij s viij 4 

,, ,, for Chese to the said durgs xiij d 

,, ,, to the p'son for dirige & mase & [corps] v4 

,, ,, for mekyng of the maydes lyght iij» 

,, ,, to y 8 p'son for the bed[e] Eolle xvj d 

1 An obligatory offering of 3s. 4d. made every year " to the Prebendary of 
vw* lady Churche," [p. 20] to " the great church at Sarum" [p. 112]; it it 
also termed Penticost (Pentical, Pentiall) Mony. 



By the Bev. W. Symonds. 37 



11. [? 1546]. for the bedro 



the wax makyng beforre ester 

on' gobyll of ale to John payns dirige 

for tapers 

for dirige ■ 



for the mase j d 

for the mayden's lyght iij d 

for a peyre of vestements xl s 

bred to John payns dyryge ij e 

chese for the same ■ xij d 

a quart of oyle v d 



12. ,, payed for the bed Rowle for thys yere viij* 

14. 1547. for ij alt r clothes bowght iij s iiij d 

„ „ for makyng of them ij d 

„ „ mendyng of the Surplyse j d 

„ „ for meltyng of the wax iiij d 

,16. 1548. for a p'cession ij d 

„ „ makyng of the Inve[n]torie & delyv'yng of the same & other 

charges iij 9 vj d 

„ „ the fonte tap [er] iij d 

„ for a booke of the Comunion V s viii d 



1549. Keceyvyd for lxj u of wax at vj d ob the li xxxij 3 x d 

„ Itm for the Redemyng of the Chalyce, whyche [&c] xxxiij 3 iiij d 
,, ,, payed for the pullyng downe of the allters & Ryddyngof the 
Churche xx d 

20. 1550. Costs : — Imp'm's for the payntyng of a clothe to hang a crose 

the Chu'ch iij 3 iiij d 

„ ,, for a q'ter of lyme ij s 

21. „ [Rec] for vj old ckerchyffs iiij" 

,, „ ,, for a pully iiij d ; for a wyer ij d ; for a lante home viij d 

,, „ ,, for olde Ierne ix d ; for the payntyd herse clothe — ij* 

„ „ „ for on' bell ij d ; for a nother bell ij d ; for a peyre of 

bed[e]s — vj d ; 

22. 1551. „ for a bottom of a senc r [censer] ij d 

, 23. 1552. Charg's : — for the boke of Comyn p'er viij s 

)> » byndyng & helyng of y* byble iij* 

„ ,, a paraphrase of erasm's xij 3 

,, ,, a salt boke [? psalter] & lasyng xv d 

,, ,, bred & wyne for the Comunyon for the hole yere 
iijs iiijd 



on' Inventory 



,, ,, a nother Inventory- 

25. 1554. for the pascall & fonte tapre — 

„ ,, frankensence 

a lyne 



„ ,, smokefarthyngs — ■ iij 3 iiij d 

,, „ making the aulters iiij 3 

27. 1555. me[n]ding the Cruetts vj d 



38 Winterslow ChurcJi Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 

p. 27. 1555. for a seare [a cere cloth'] 

„ ,, for the censoure 



,, ,, the oyle vatte iij s iiij d 

,, „ naylis for the Rode [rood] j d ob 

„ ,, payntyng marye & Jhon y iij d 

p. 28. ,, the paschall & va'testap' [font-taper] ij s ix cl 

„ ,, a lyne for the pyxe j d 

,, ,, smokefarthyngs iij 3 iiij d 

p. 30. 1556. for two candellstycks ij s iiij d 

„ ,, a portua boke [breviary] x s 

,, ,, a [? berelaw] for the pex & y° tassells xx d 

„ „ y c pascawll & y e vant taper ij s vj d 

,, ,, francinncens i d 



a paxe 

a lyne cord- 
a lantern — 



for rnakyng of y e hole in y e aulter vj d 

for y e locke & jemose for the boxe in the aulter x d 

mendyng of the banors & the strerners — iiij d 

for the lampe ij s 

i-id 



31. ,, for mendyng of the best surples- 
two naylis for the lampe- 



— ii d 



for clothe for the Aulter ij s ij d 

for payntyng of the same clothe xiiij d 

franc'ncens — j d 

the paschall & y e vant taper xv? 

a seve for the holy bred ■ 

lamp oylle & for a bottell 

settyng up of the lampe 



id 



p. 32. „ rnakyng a surples for the dark & a head clothe for the albe iiij d 

„ 1557. francinncens j d 

„ ,, lampe oylle ■ iiij d 

,, ,, waxe for y e pascall xx d 

p. 35. [? 1558-59]. francinncens j a 

rnakyng of the pascall & the vant taper ■ xiiij d 

payd for too boks viij' vj d 

lampe oylle iij d 

It' for takyng downe of the allters xij d 



for the table iij 3 iij 11 

for a fole stole [fald stool or litany desk A iiija 

p. 38. 1560. a byble and a parapheres [ paraphrase of Erasmus] xix 6 [ 

n „ ' for bred & wyne & for a bottel -xx* ob 

p. 40. [Entries on p. 40 show that the interior of the Church was much j 

pulled about and painted.] 

1 The entries for bread and wine are so numerous that all the rest are here 
omitted. See under Gifts for the special offerings made by the Eector and 
Communicants for this purpose. 



By the Rev. W. Symonds. 



39 



40. 



for alle the worke that Wyllyam did abowght the Rod lofffc X s ij d 
nayls for the same worke vj d 



p. 


43. 


1562. 


p- 


46. 


1563. 


p. 


55. 


1566. 


p- 


59. 


1567. 


p. 


60. 




p- 


63. 


1568. 



[Rec] for a holy water pot (sold) 

[Paid] for a carpet clothe 

Reperacion of the font 

It' for holand for a surplus 

makyng off the surplus — 

for a tablement 






id 



-1] ! 



xnf 
viij d 

_..... X ija 

It' for holond for to rne[n]d the surpleces iiij s 

„ ,, mendyng the surples : iiij d 

p. 68. 1569. [In 1569 after the wardens had been cited before " the queue's 
vysyters" further plundering seems to have taken place and 
the following goods were sold : — 

Receyved for brasse & coper vj s 

Receyved of anys hayse for lynyn clothes iij s vj d 

viij d 

xvj d 



79. 
85. 



99. 
100. 



1574 



Receyved of Jarnys lake for the pexe 

R' for more lynen gere ■ 

R' for lynen 

Costs: — It' the commandements & on' elle of canvas 



[?1576]. for a boke of artycles 

„ for the exchaunge of the cup 



for a boke of servyce & a homily boke- 
for the Injunctyons- 



-ii] s in 
— x 






1581. 



It' that we spent when we sold the chalyce 
R' for a chalyce that was sold 



-in]" 



■xlv ! 



,, ,, R' of m r alyxander thystelthawyt for a cope- 
103. 1584. mendyng of the surples 



106. 
107. 
108. 
109. 
112. 



waschyng of the church clothes 

byndyng the byble ■ 

R' for an olde surplis - 



1585. 



1588. 



a loke and a peare of I ernes for a coffer 

a boke of comon prayer 

a boke of common prayer 

a borde clothe 



-iij s iii-j d 

— ij s ij d 



xiirj" 

iij s 

iij s viif 

-vj s iiif 



114- 
118. 

121. 

123. 
129. 



ij books of prayer 

1588-9. smoke farthings 



15-16. 

1593. booke of prayers for the quenes ma ,ifs [blank] 
„ smoke farthings 

1594. the booke of Articles 



vj" 

-iij s iiij" 
viif 



in.! 



1595. mendinge of the surplis 

1599. [Rec d j for an olde bible booke • 
„ [Paid] for a bible 



|p. 130. 

132. 
133. 



for a register booke - 
mendinge of the surplise — 
[Rec] for one old surplice- 



1600. 



Item layd forth for y e surplesse 

a homilye boocke 

y c queen's Institutions 



-111] 8 V] a 

XXX s 

— v* vj" 
iiij d 

if 

- xxv s 8 d 
■ [? xvj 5 ] 
-[? vij d ] 



40 Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 
to y e pariter for a prayer boke 



p- 


135. 


1602. 


p- 


138. 


1608. 


p- 


139. 


»> 


p- 


140. 


1609. 



thomas mane for y e mending of a comilnion tabel xij d 

for a pulpit cloth -vj 8 j d 

[_A great expenditure on lime to whitewash the Church, and 

on painty 

„ „ a pewter pott ■ iij* 

p. 147. 1611. a bracket that Thomas man hath set up ij d 

„ „ a strake of Iron for the Pulpite [&c] 

ffor a newe Pulpitt xxij s j d 

a boocke of comon prayer iiij" 

Ite' j homely booke in giles Ingram his costodie. 

for a new flagon iij" iiij' 1 

2] mending the church fladgin ij d 

a carpete clothe for the Churche vij 5 

for changing the church fladgin xviij d 

ij q rt3 of muscadyne the firste Sundaye of June ij s 

ij bookes of the newe prayers to god for staye of the plague ij 8 

bread & wyne on Sheere Thursdaye [Thursday before J?asfer~] 

for a newe bible 30 s 

It'm layed out towards the full satisfacc'on of I s for the great 

bible ; xx* 

rec' for the old bible sold to Alex r Thistleth[way£e]Esq r vj 9 viij d 

Item Paide for a breff of the statut of archari j» 

[? 1632] for plonckes bo't of Thomas Lacke for to macke the 

polppit steares iij 8 4 d 

for a vant Line ■ vj d 

the booke of Kecreac'on [? the notorious Book of Sports.] 

the p'sentment of the decay of the writing of the tenn 

comandements 

the bocke of the fast 1* 

1637. payd to the Smith for a peaer of geumiles for the comminen 

rayles for the dore to hang in is & ffor nailles 2 8 d 

, , „ » (Pam Sunday 

bread & wyne forJ yhee Thursd J ay 

Palme Sunday & Sheare Thursday 

Layd out at the protestation, for a drinkeinge 1* 

(All Saints Day 2 s 
Shrof Sunday 2. 6 
Pame Sunday 3. 
Thursday before Easter . . . 

p. 244. 1647. It'm for the Dirictory 5 8 10 d 

p. 247. 1648. Bread & wine uppon Palme sondaye 4" 8 l1 



Briefs. 

p. 263. [? 1661] (1) Milton Abbas, Dorset 5 8 8 d 

(2) Ilmister, Somerset 6 s 6 d 

(3) Walter Hughes, of "Whateley, Oxon 3' 9 d 



p- 


152. 


1615. 


p- 


160. 


1617. 


p- 


165. 


1618. 


p- 


166. 


1619. 


p- 


174. 


[? 16S 


p- 


175. 


1623. 


p- 


177. 


1625. 


P' 


178. 


»> 


p- 


179. 


!» 


p- 


182. 


1626. 


p- 


184. 


1627. 


p- 


186. 


1628. 


p- 


199. 


[P163 


p- 


201. 


)J 


p. 


204. 


1633. 


p- 


206. 


1634. 


p- 


219. 


1636. 


p- 


223. 


1637. 


p- 


229. 


1639. 


p- 


232. 


1640. 


p 


234. 


1641. 



By the Bev. W. Symonds. 41 

(4) Little Melton, Norfolk 2 3 d 

(5) City of Oxford 6 a 3 d 
p. 264. (6) St Dunstansjn the West 5 3 d 



V. — Burials in the Church, and Marriages, &c. 

p. 8. 1544. R' of Robert benettswyfe for hys buryall yn the Churche vj 3 viij d 
p. 2 — 10. 1542 — 5. [The dirge of John Payn of Middleton] 
p. 15. 1547. Reeeyvyd of Richard Halle for John Stevyns knyll [knell] iiij d 
p. 18. 1549. R' of John Bafe for the Ryngyng of the bells [? marriage] — ij 3 
p. 21. 1550. [Rec] of Jone thistyllthwayte for hir ' husbonds lyyingin the 

Church iij 3 iiij d 

p. 29. 1556. Rec'of Johne thystyllthawyt for aburyallein the church vj 8 viij d 
p. 36. 1558. Rec' of Wyllyam more for a buryall in the church — vj s viij d 

p. 69. 1569-70. a knelle for Jone Sammon vj d 

p. 73. 1572. a knelle for Margaret West, of Walap vj d 

p. 77. 1573. a knelle of gylles yngram — iiij d 

p. 96. 1580. R' of mystresse Zuche [Zouche] for a knelle xij d 

p. 99. 1581. It' for parchment to make a boke for chrystenyng & buryyng 

& weddyng viii d 

p. 100. „ R' of m r alyxander thystelthawyt for the buryall of hys mother 

vj" viij d 

p. 112. 1587. rec' of Jhon benet for hys fathers buryng vj 3 viij d 

p. 125. 1596. It'm for the maryage of gorge whitlocke ij d 

„ „ m r elicksander thiseltut gave to the buryal of his dafter iij 9 iiij d 

p. 129. 1599. the ringinge of goodwiefe bater's knill xij d 

,, ,, Rec' of Mr. Bassett for his manage vj d 

,, ,, Rec' of Richard Batt for his mariage ij d 

„ „ for a register booke [Vol. I. of the Reg. begins 1596 — 8] v 3 vj d 

p. 130. „ for the Covering of Christopher stile his grave ■ 



p. 131. 1600. for m r Olfeilds buriall in y e churche ■ vj s viij d 

,, „ for m r yonges knell xij d 

„ „ for y e buryall of m r Stockman's Childe v s 

„ „ for Agnes yemens knell xij d 

p. 134. 1601. rec' of m r Punchington for y e buryall of his child in y e churche V s 

p. 138. 1608. [Lawrence heyes deceased] 

p. 143. 1610. [Walter Baffe Deceased] 

„ „ Rec' for two manages iiij d 



p. 145. 1611. rec' of William Pearce for his marriage ij d 

p. 146. ,, rec' for the buriall of marie Thistlethwayte in the Church vj 3 viij d 

,, „ rec' of William St[r]ugnell for his mariage ij cl 

p. 149. 1615. Rec' of m r Thistlethwait ffor the buriall of Tho: Peterson in 

the Church vj" viij d 

p. 155. 1616. for Covering of Petersonns grave ■ xiij d 

p. 158. 1617. Rec' for the buriall of m r Henry Thistlethwaite vj 3 viij d 

1 The next entry shows that this tvas Giles Thistlethtoayte.] 



42 Wintersloio Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 

p. 162. 1618. Eeseved of m r inaten of farley for the beriall of his ehaild in 

the church iij s iiij d 

,, ,, Item for Robart Poore mareg ij d 

p. 171. 1620. for the Buriall of Alexander Thistlethwayt in the Churchevj s viij d 

,, ,, for the buriall of Wm Gree[n]woode in the churche — vj s viij' 1 

p. 185. 1628. J rec' of m r John Good for buringe of a child in the Church 

named Errington iij s iiij d 

p. 188. 1629. Beceved of m r Edward Thistlethwayt for burying of his childrie 

in the Church -— 10 s 

p. 194. 1632. Rec' of m r Alexander Thistlethwayte th'elder for the buryall of 

his daughter Christian in the Church iij s iiij 4 

p. 205. 1633. Receaved of A bride for A Cok 4 d 

p. 228. 1639. rec' of William Edwards for the burying of his wife & child x s 
, t ,, rec' of Gabriel Pile esq — x s 

„ ,, rec' of M r John Edwards for his father's burial 6 s 8 d 
p. 230. 1640. Rec' of M r Peregr. Thistlethwayte for the burying of his wief 

in the church ■ vj s vj 4 

t> ,, Rec' of Edward Thistlethwayt for the burying of Alex. \ -„ 5 
Thistlethwayte his father & for a legacye of 3 s 4 d } 

After 1640 no more of such entries occur. 

VI. — Cock-shies, Easter Eggs, and Mayings. 

p. 1. 1542. It'm R' for the cocke mony clere x [? s ] 

R' for eggs and gatheryng vj d 

p. 13. 1547. In p'm's for eggs gatheryd att ester . . 

,, ,, It'm for the coke att ester xvij d 

p. 28. 1555. It' to the mynstrell on may day viij d 

p. 30. 1556. It' for ye mynstrell at may & Wytsontyd iiij s viij a 

p. 31. „ It y' was gayned w' throyeng at the cocke xviij d 

,, ,, It for egs x a 

p. 28. 1555. [Paid] for iij cockys xvij d 

p. 31. 1556. It' payed to Rolond for y c mayyng ■ vj d 

p. 32. 1557. It' y' was gayned w' y e cocke xiiij d 

p. 41. 1561. If for throwyng at the coke vii . . 

R' for eggs iij d 

p. 47. 1563. It' for throyng at the cocke iiij* 

,, ,, It for throwyng at the cock iij s ij d 

p. 51. 1564. R' w' throwyng at the cocke iij s vj d 

p. 57. 1566. R' for a cocke iiij d 

„ ,, R' for on' other cocke xvj d 

p. 59. 1567. [paid] for a cocke v d 

p. 61. „ It R' w l throwyng at the cocks iij s iij d 

p. 63. 1568, [Paid] for a cocke v d 

p. 65. „ R' for throwyng at the cocke ij s ij d 



This burial of an Errington is not in the register. 



By the Rev. W. Symonds. 43 

Similar entries occur during the following years ; the last re- 
corded is : — 
p. 241. 1644-5. more receaved for a cocke att Ester 0. 01 s . 8 d 



VII. — Penticost Money to the Cathedral. 

p. 9. 1544. It' to o r lady Churche at whyfcson . . . iij s iiij a 

p. 12. 1546. payed to ow r lady Churche at whytsontyde iij 8 iiij a 

p. 19. 1549. It'm payed to o r mother Churche yn Sarum for a certyn dewty 
whyche ys dew to be payed at whyt mu'day for ij yeres past 

that ys to sey att iij s iiij d by the yere vj 9 viij* 

p. 20. 1550. It'm payed to the p'bendary of ow r lady Churche for whytson 

money for ij yeres at iij s iiij d the yere vj s viij d 

p. 22. 1551. In p'm's payed to Ric' holand to the use of F. Chaundeler for 

whytson money iij B iiij d 

to ow r lady Churche for whytscon offeryngs iij 8 iiij d 

It' for smoke farthyngs iij s iiij d 

It' smokefarthyngs iij s iiij d 

It' that was payed to salsbery to our lady church iij s iiij d 

Similar entries occur year by year ; the following are some later 

variations :— 

payd unto the great church at sarum iij s iiij d 

smoke farthings iij s iiij J 

smoke farthings iij 8 iiij d 

ffor Pentecost monie iij 8 iiij a 

do do 

Layd out for the pentyeos mony wich is 3 s 4 d 

pentiall money to our lady Church 3 s 4 d 

Pentecet mony 3 s 4 d 

pinticall money 3 s 4 d 



p- 


23. 


1552. 


p- 


25. 


1554. 


p- 


28. 


1555. 


p- 


30. 


1556. 



P 


112. 


1587. 


P- 


114. 


1588. 


P- 


115. 


1589. 


P- 


151. 


1615. 


P- 


155. 


1616. 


P- 


188. 


1629. 


P- 


203. 


1633. 


P- 


231. 


1640. 


P. 


234. 


1641. 



VIII. — Allocation of Church Sittings. 

On page 196, which is much torn, is recorded the grant by John 
(Davenant),Lord Bishop of Sarum.and his Chancellor,to Alexander 
Thistlethwayte the elder, gent., and Mary Baughe, widow, of a 
seat " gayned by throwinge them somewhat nearer together in the 
south side of the myddle Isle," which was situated behind the 
" seate or Pughe " of Gyles Ingram. The grant is dated 1631, 24th 
of March. 



44 Winterslow Church BecJconings, 1542 — 1661. 

The following order is entered on p. 207, next the accounts for 
1634:— 

An order & diric'on by the Churchwardens of the places & by the order of 
Docter Line derichtion as foloeth 

Imprirnes on the south syde of the Church agaynst the wall from the 
littel ' lie downe to the great 2 dore — vidlt in the upper most Roorne next to 
the passage shall hereafter belonge unto A messe & halfe a yard lands lying 
in West Winterslowe nowe in the tennure of John King the second place for 
sitting there by the wall shall heare after be long to one halfe a year[d] nowe 
in the tennuer [of] Thomas Lake 

It'm in the second seat being a seat for men it is ordered that the utter 
place next to the passag shall heareafter belong unt[o]A Messe & halfe a yard 
land in East Winterslow now in the tennue[r] of James ffeltham and that the 
second place next to the wal[l] shall hereafter beloDge unto A Messe & yard 
land lyinge in West Winterslowe nowe in the tennue of John Webb 

It'm the third seat for men it is ordered that the utter most p[lace] next to the 
passage there shall hereaf[ter] belonge unto A mass & half a yardla[nd] Lying 
in meddile Winterslow now in th[e] tenuer of Lucke Webb the second pl[ace] 
next to the wall shall hereafter be longe unto a mass teyne land lying meddel 
Winterslow in tenure of All[ex r ] Numan 

It'm th . . . ff 4 seat for men it is ordered that the uttermost place 
next to the passage ther shall belong unto a Co[te] & land lying in middell 
Winterslow (p. 208) nowe in the tennure of Henry Webb and the other place 
in that seat next to the wall shall hereafter be longe unto A Cote & teye land 
nowe in the tennure of mary Aman Widowe but Gyles Ingram is to have the 
same presently 

It'm in the ffifte seat being a seat for men it is ordered that the utter most 
place next to the passage shall hereafter belong unto a Cote & land in East 
Winterslow nowe in the tennur of John Stone & the other place next to the 
wall shall here after belong unto a Cote & land nowe in the tenure of Will 
Judde the 6 seat John merch & Allex Arnoll the 7 seat Eobbart Whit & 
Robbart Tynnam next the wall 

Imprimis one the south side of the bodye of the Church from the passag 
there & so downeward to the west and lowest passage vidlt in the uppermost 
seat being a . . . seat for men it is ordered that the first place belong 
unto m r Henry Edwards [? gent] the next to John Bafye z the 3 to in r 
Marchshall 3 John Redman Baufy for tow yeard Lands & 4 to John Redman 

It'm in the second seat being a seat for men it is ordered that the frist 
Rome of sitting in that seat shall hearafter belong unto a massage & one yard 
land & halfe in West Winterslowe now in the tenuer of Giles Ingram & the 
second of place of sitting in that seat is belong to Giles Grenwood 3 plase to 
Henry Dinch 4 place to m r whin but Rolling Dipe 4 is to hold the seat till 

1 The south aisle. - The door under the tower. 

3 The names in italic are struck through. 

4 Rowland Deepe is meant. 



By the Rev. W. Symonds. 45 

m r whitat hav suit to a 1 ho[u]se <fe then he is to pay Eolen Dip a game* or 
els Dip is to . . . hold it still til he be p a (p. 209) 

It'rn in the Third seat being a seat for weemen it is ordered that the frist 
Home in that seat shall hearafter Eemayne tow 2 yard land & an half lying 
in West Winterslowe nowe in the tennuer of Symon Clifford Esqer or of his 
tennant . the 2 plase to John Thistelwayt Esqur the 3 plase to one yard land 
in Est Winter slow Allex Ingram the 4 place Thomas Best 

It'm it is ordered the 4 seat one the Right hand agaynst the Church piller 
shall herafter belonge unto A mess: & one yea'd land & [a] half a yard of 
perdys* all liing in West Winterslo nowe in the tenuer of Giles Ingram 

It'm in the ffift seat being a seat for wemen It is ordered that the frist & 
uppermost place in that seat shall hereafter belong unto a Cote land liyng in 
middele Winterslowe nowe in the tenure of John Eyeres . & the second place 
fer settinge in that seat shall hereafter belong unto a mess : & half a yard 
Land nowe in the tenuer of John King. And the Third place for sitting shall 
hereafter belong unto a Cote lying in West winterslow nowe in the tenuer of 
John John Eyeres & the ffower place for seting in that seat shall here after 
be long unto John Best Best James Lacke 3 

The 6 seatte being a seate for woman It is ordered that the first in that sete 
shall belong Thomas Lake & to Richard Ingram . 3 to William Ingram 4 to 
William Judde of medlto' 

(p. 210). It'm one the North syde next unto the body of the Church from 
the passage ther that lyet between the great Pewes or the ffirst seat being 
next below the sayd passage being a seat for men Jt is ordered that the place 
of sitting in that seat next unto the body of the Church shall hereafter belong 
unto A Message & yard land lying in myddle Winterslow nowe in the tenuer 
of Allexand: Thistlethwayt & the next place of seting in that sete shall here- 
after belonge unto Two yard land & half lying in West Winterslowe nowe in 
the tener of Syman Clifford Esquer or his tennent the 3 place Edward 
Thistlethwayt is to have it duering his fathers liefe and after & is to hold the 
seat to he & his assigens untill he hath the mony he Layd out for the seat . the 
4 place shall belong unto two yard Land Lying in Wist Winterslow in the 
tener of John Thistlethwayte Esqu r or his tenant 

It'm the 2 seat being alsoe a seat for men It is ordered that the frist Rome 
of seting belong unto A Mess: & yardland lying in Est Winterslow now in 
tenuer of Robbart Bennet & the second place in that sete shall hearafter 
belong two yard Land L[y]ing in meddell Wintersl: in the tenuar of Will: 
Parsons the 3 seat place of seting in that seat shall be long unto A mess: & 
a yard Land in Wist Winterslo in the tennuer of William Best 4 place to 
John Walter in meddell Winterslow 

(p. 211.) It'm in the Third seat there adjoyning to the pulpitt being a 
little seat & for a woman It is ordered that the same seat shall hereafter 
belonge unto A messauge & yard land & half lying in Winterslow in the 
tenure of Henry Edwards gentleman by the [blank] 

1 Again ? 

2 Purdey : name struck through. 

3 Struck out. 



46 



Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 



It'm the ffowerth seat ther be lowe the pulpitt being a seat for weemen It 
is that the same seat shall heareafter belong unto a messauge and 2 yard 
lands lying midel winterslow in the tennur of Allex Thistlethwayt 

It'm in the fHft seat being a seate for weman It is ordered that the first 
place wedow 1 A man the next place to Allex Numan in meddell Wenterslow 
the 3 place shall be long unto one yard Land in Wist Winter slowe in the 
tennur of John Kedm: 

It'm the 6 seat being a seat for wemen the first Rome for John Walter 2 
for Henry Dench 3 for James ffiltham & 4 place belong to mersh in the tennuer 
of of L weddow Webbe 

One the north side of the Church next the lettell dore the first seat John 
Eyers the other ij Romes for Eston farm 

The nex seat to Robbart Thist William 1 & Richard Ingram, William Ingram 
the 3 seat being a seat for weman to barrow farme liing in Est Winterslou 3 
other part of the seat to wedow Baugh for ij yard land in Est Wenterslow now 
in [blank] 

(p. 212.) The 4 seat being a seat for weman the first place to Robbart 
Benett the 2 place to William Best the 3 place to William Parssons 

The 5 seat for weman Wedow Grenwood nichlas dipen John Stone the 6 
seat for weman Hugh Holloway Nichlas Walters 3 place to Henry Numan 
the 7 seat for men Henty Numan Hugh Hollow y Nichlas Walters Hugh, 
hollowaye the 8 seat Walter Hall Nichlas Dixen 3 place John Ay ers 3 next 
to the great dore by the wall in the Long seat the seat next the dore Walter 
hall John Wehb* Boundy Henry Webbe John Webbe Willi Carter Robbart 
Tynharn Allex Arnould Baptist deepe Robb Whit the yonger Robber Rossell 
Robbart Whit the Smith 

one nue seat next the great dore by the wall is one seat for Richard Ely 
his wiyfe 2 place for John Whit the Smith and the 3 plaes for William Wait 
the Collermacker & the 4 place for John mearch 

IX. — List of Churchwardens. 



Nov. 1541, to Oct. 


1542 




[Page] 


Oct., 1542 


John Bat 


Thomas Newman 


3 


11 Nov., 1543 


Thomas Newman 


John Payne 


3, 7 


18 Oct., 1544 


John Payne 


John Ockborne 


7 


1546 


Thomas Payne 


John Ockborne 


13 


2 Nov., 1547 


William Payne 


William More 


13, 16 


2 Oct., 1548 


William More 


Thomas Vyncent 


16, 17 


6 Oct., 1549 


Thomas Vincent 


Wylliam Ingram 


17. 20 


26 Oct., 1550 


William Ingram 


William Hayse 


20, 22 


3 Oct., 1551 


William Hayse 


Richard Hawle 


22, 23 


9 Oct., 1552 


Richard Haule 


Richard Noble 


23,24 


8 Oct., 1553 


Richard Noble 


Richard Walter 


24 



1 Widow Aman. 

2 Struck through. 

3 A second hand has here repeated " Nichlas Dixen 3 place." 
4 Struck through. 



By the JRev. W. Symonds. 



47 



1 Nov,, 1554 

6 Oct., 1555 
11 Oct., 1556 
13 Oct., 1557 
16 Oct., 1558 
. . . March, 1560 
20 Oct., 1560 
19 Oct., 1561 

1 Nov., 1562 
24 Oct., 1563 
13 May, 1564 
13 Oct,, 1566 

5 Oct., 1567 



John Batte 
Wylliam Newman 
"Wylliam Newman 
Thomas Payne 
Alyxander Benet 
Bychard Payne 



Bichard Walter 
John Batt 
Thomas Payne 
Alyxander Benet 
Bychard Payne 



24, 26 
26, 29 
29, 32 
32, 34 
34 



LeonardThystylthawyt 34, 37 



Leonard ThistellthawytWyllyam Hayse 



6 Eliz. 

8 Eliz. 

9 Eliz. 



17 Oct., 1568 10 Eliz. 

1 Nov., 1569 11 Eliz. 
1 Nov., 1571 13 Eliz. 



Wyllyam Hayse 
Wyllyam More 
Jhone Webe 
Wyllyam Best 
Wyllyam Plomley 
Wyllyam Haulle 

Thomas Grenhod 



1 Nov 

2 Oct. 



, 1573 15 Eliz 
1575 17 Eliz 



20 Oct., 1577 19 Eliz 

12 Oct., 1578 20 Eliz 
9 Oct., 1580 22 Eliz 

15 Oct., 1581 23 Eliz 
1 Nov., 1582 24 Eliz. 

9 Nov., 1584 26 Eliz. 

21 Nov., 1585 

13 Oct.. 1588 

14 Dec, 1590 32 Eliz 

20 Dec,, 1591 33 Eliz 



Thomas Payne 
Bychard Great 
Bychard Greet 
Thomas Vencent 
Myghell Newman 
Wyllyam Best 
Bychard Yngram 
Thomas Payne 
Bobard Coper 



Wyllyam More 
Jhone Webe 
Wyllyam Best 
Wyliam Plomlye 
Wyllyam Hawlle 
Thomas Grenwod 
( Edward Strugnell ' 
| Thomas Payne(cfepwfy) 



37, 39 
39, 41 
41,44 
44, 48 

48, 54 
54, 58 
58, 62 

1 62,65 



Wyllyam Hayse 
Alyxsander Webe 
Wyllyam Best 
Myghell Newman 
Jhone Bat 
Bychard Yngram 
Thomas Payne 
Bychard Walter 
Austen Benet 



7 Oct., 



26 Oct 

28 Nov., 

9 Oct., 

20 Jan., 

8 Oct., 

7 Oct., 

14 Dec, 

12 Oct., 

17 Oct., 



1592 

1593 85 Eliz. 

1594 36 Eliz, 

1595 37 Eliz, 

1596 39 Eliz 

1597 39 Eliz. 
[1598 '40 Eliz. 
[1599] 41 Eliz 
. . . 2 41 Eliz 
[1600]42 Eliz 
1601 
1602 



65, 70 

70,75 

75 

75,81 

81 

87 

87,89 

91,93 

93, 97 

97, 101 

Alyxander Budman 

101, 102 

Bobart Lake Thomas Newman 102,104,108 

["? Thomas Newman] ThomasPayne,/ww. 108,110,113 
Alexander Thistlethait, jun. Eobert Lake 113,114 
Leonard Newman 114, 115 
(John Bennett Iiikiir 

t Thomas Payne, sen r \ L10 > lLiy 
Bichard Geffrey, alias Best 116, 118 



Mr Alyxsander Thystelthawyt 



John Webb 

Gyles Yngram 

John Walter 
James Lacke 
William Grenewood 



4 May, . . . 
24 May, . . . 

3 Apr., 1608 
23 Apr., 1609 
15 Apr., 1610 
31 March, 1611 
19 Apr., 1612 



Thomas Mann 
William Best 
Alexander Arnold 
William Greenewod 
William Greenwoode 

John Budman 

Bobert Lake 
William West 

Bichard Hall 
Baptist Deepe 
Bichard Paine 
Bichard Aisher 
[? William Beste] 



[? John Walter] 118, 121 

James Lacke 121, 123 

Thomas Mann 123, 124 

William Beste 124, 126 

Alexander Arnold 126, 127 

William Grenewod 127, 129 

Alexander Arnold 129, 130 

John Bedman 130, 132 
132 

Henry Hammon 132, 134 

William Wersdall 134 

John Churcher 136 

Bichard Hall 136 

Bobert Lake 137 

Baptist Deepe 138, 139 

Bichard Paine 139, 143 

Bichard Aisher 143, 145 

William Beste 145, 148 

Augustine Bennet 148 



1 Died during his year of office. 
3 Sic. 



48 Winterslow Church Reckonings, 1542 — 1661. 

[Several pages here are missing in the look.'] 



.... 


1615 


Walter Newman 


Thomas Kinge 




149 


14 Apr. 


1616 


Thomas King 


Henrie Denche 




152 


27 Apr. 


1617 


Henry Deanche 


John Redman 


156 


160 


12 Apr. 


1618 


John Redman 


Alexander Newman 




160 


.... 


1619 


Alexander Newman 


Stephen Hale [Hall 


1165 


,168 


23 Apr. 


1620 


Stephen Hall 


William Greenwoodd 1 168,171 


.... 


1621 


John Baughe 


William Edwardes 




172 


■ • • • 


1622 


William Edwards 


William Parsons 


173 


174 


■ • • • 


1623 


William Parsons 


William Worsedale 




174 


4 Apr. 

15 Apr. 


, 1624 










1625 


James Feltham 


John Webbe 


177 


179 


26 Apr. 


1626 


John Web 


Allexander Numan' 




179 


8 Apr. 


1627 


Allexander Numan 


John Redman 3 




183 


20 Apr. 


, 1628 


John Redman 


William Judd 


185 


187 


12 Apr. 


, 1629 


William Judde 


Giles Ingram 


187 


190 


4 Apr. 


1630 


Giles Ingram 


John Thistlewayte 


190 


193 


17 Apr. 


1631 


John Thistlethwayte 


Gyles Ingram 




193 




[1632] 


Gyles Ingram 


Robert Bennett 




195 


28 Apr. 


1633 


Robart Bennet 


William Best 




202 


.... 


1634 


S William Best 

\ John Webbe (dep.for 


p, .i [■ Henrye Newman 


205 




1635 


Henry Newman 


Nicholas At-watters 




213 


24 Apr. 


1636 


Nicholas Walters 


Giles Ingram 




217 


16 Apr. 


,1637 


Giles Ingram 


Alexander Walter 




221 




1638 


Alexander Walter 


Alexander Newman 




225 




1639 


Alexander Newman 


Alexander Arnold 




227 




1640 


Alexander Arnold 


Robert Bennett 




230 




1641 


Robert Bennett 


Jonn Kinge 




232 


24 Apr. 


1642 


John King 


Robart Walter 




235 


9 Apr. 


1643 


Robert Walter 


Robert White 




237 


28 Apr. 


1644 


Robart White 


John Thistlethwayte 




239 




1645 
, 1649 


John Thistlethwayte 
John Gilberte ■ 






241 


1 Apr. 


Edward Webb 


248 


16 Apr. 


1651 


William Harris 


Giles Ingram 




250 


2 Apr. 
26 Apr. 


1651 4 
1652 


Edward Smith 
Alexander Redman 






252 


Henry Webb 


256 




1653 


William Ingram 


Henry Bennett 




258 


9 Apr., 


1654 


Mr. Edward Thistlethwayte John Kinge 




258 


15 Apr., 


1655 


John Reeves 


James Feltham 




259 


7 Apr. 


1656 


William Deepe 


William Reeves 




259 


1 Apr. 


1657 


Thomas Howard 


Richard Ingram 




260 




1658 


Richard Bennett 


Robert Wynte [r] 




260 


6 Apr. 


1659 


John Bennett 


Leonard White \ t> t 


261 
126 


24 Apr. 


1660 


Hugh Holloway 


Alexander Ingram 




261 


12 Apr. 


1661 


Henrye Greenwood 


( William Ingram 
\ for Nicholas Waters 


} 


262 



1 Died during his year of office. 

2 " Who servethfor Mr. Peregrine Thistlethwayte." 

3 Chosen by the minister and the neighbours of Weston then present. 

* Sic. 



By the Rev. W. Symonds. 49 

X. — Puzzles. 

p. 1 for ij kebbs solde ij s xj d 

p. 22 ree. of thorn's newman for the Somer log (or hog) iiij d [? May pole] 

p. 23 for binding & helyng (of y* byble iij B ) 

p. 23 for a salt boke & lasyng xv d [? sewing] 

p. 30 for a berclaw for the pex & y e tassells xx d 

p. 30 for y e locke k jemose (for the boxe in the aulter x d 1556) 

p. 60 [paid] for a tablement xij d 

p. 83 payed for a gamy sell ofvessell x d [among costs for King-ale] 

p. 96 for a sommer jpolle (rec. of Johne mors viij d [? May pole] 



Since revising the proof of this article the Editor has kindly- 
sent me the following explanations of four of the ahove puzzles. 

p. 1. "Kebbers"= refuse sheep taken out of the flock (Halli- 

ivell's Dictionary). 
p. 23. "Binding and helyng"; helyng=covering, heal or hele is 

still used in Wilts in the sense of cover, in sowing 

grain. 

p. 30. "Locke and jemose"; jemose is gimmace or gimmall=a 
hinge. 

p. 30. The Rev. A. D. Hill writes : — " There are three things a 
berclaw for the pex ' might be : (1) a canopy of silk or linen which 
sometimes had ' knoppis of golde & tacellys ' ; (2) a pyx cloth, a 
square napkin with a hole and weighted tassells at the corners 
to keep it down over the pyx; (3) a 'purse ' or cloth for carrying 
the pyx, which was sometimes the hanging pyx, when no other was 
afforded. The tasselis seem to point to (2) ; but might not ' berclaw ' 
be ' bearing cloth ' ? (See Micklethwaitc's ' Ornaments.') " 

p. 83. "A garnysch of vessell"=a set of vessels, usually twelve 
(see HalliwelVs Dictionary). 

W. Symonds. 

Erratum. On.p. 35, line 27, for 1728 read 1708. 
fOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. E 



50 



THE SAXON BOUNDARIES OF DOWNTON, WILTS. 

By The Rev. A. Du Boulay Hill, Rector of East Bridgford, Notts, 
formerly Vicar of Downton. 

[Read at the Salisbury Meeting, 1908.] 

A folio volume in the British Museum, probably the oldest bound 
volume among its treasures, is known as " Codex Wintonicnsis " 
(No. 15350 Addit. MSS.). It is a twelfth century cartulary, made 
by the monks of S. Swithun's Priory, at Winchester. It belonged 
to the library of the Cathedral, where it was accidentally discovered 
propping up the seat of a small chorister, and purchased for the 
Museum in 1841. This discovery caused Kemble to write his 
Vol. V., and a great part of the book has been transcribed by 
Mr. W. de G-. Birch, F.S.A., in his Cartularium Saxonicum. 

Five of these collected charters refer to land in Downton granted 
by King Cynewalc (Kenwalch) to the Cathedral Church of 
Winchester, hallowed in 648, carrying out the promise made by 
his father Cynegils to Bishop Birinus. 

They are as follows, all being placed together in Codex Wintoni- 
ensis, fol. 13 — 16 : — 

(1) Grant by King Cynewalc of land in Downton, before 672 

(Birch, Cart. Sax., No. 27). 

(2) A " Restitution " of King Ecgberht in 826 (Birch, Cart. 

Sax., No. 391). 

(3) A confirmation of the grant, made at a Witena-gemot of 

King ^Ethelstan in 932 (Birch, Cart. Sax., No. 690). 

(4) A restitution of King Eadred in 948 (Birch, Cart. Sax. y 

No. 863). 

(5) A charter of King iEthelred. 

These all refer to the same land, the charters being in Latin, and 
the same boundaries being described in Anglo-Saxon, with some 
variations and omissions. 



The Saxon Boundaries of Downton, Wilts. 51 

The document which stands first in the cartulary is here given 
at length : — 

Carta Eegis Cynewalc de Dunttjne. 

Regnante imperpetuum domino nostro Jhesu Christo summo et ineffabili 
rerum creatori omnium visibilium et invisibilium. 

Cunctis patenter mortalibus patet, quod cuneta quae videntur finem habent 
et quae non videntur aeterna sunt. Qua propter ego, Cynevalc, alti throni 
annuente moderatoris imperio Rex occidentalium Saxonum quandam ruris 
partem mei proprii juris, C. videlicet mansas in villa que Duntun dicitur cum 
pratis silvis pascuis omnibusque ad se rite pertinentibus, cum consensu meorum 
optimatum, pro meorum expiatione piaculorum meique statu imperii ecclesie 
que Wintoniae in honore Sancti Petri apostolorum principis Paulique dedicata 
consistit libens perpetualiter concedo. Sit hoc predictum rus omni terrena? 
servitutis jugo liberum tribus exceptis rata videlicet expeditione pontis arcisve 
constructione. Et in dornini nostri nomine precipio ut nemo meorum suc- 
cessorum regum episcoporum principumve hanc meam donationem presumat 
violare. Quod si quisquam transgressus fuerit, sciat se in judicio domini 
coram Christo et omnibus Sanctis ejus rationem redditururn pcenasque in 
eternum passurum nisi hie digua satisfactione celeriter emendare curaverit, 
quod contra sanctos Dei apostolos audacter deliquid. 

Translation. 

Grant by Cynewalc, King of Wessex, to Winchester Cathedral of land in 
Duntun. 

Our Lord Jesus Christ being King for ever, Unto' the Most High and 
ineffable Creator of all things visible and invisible. 

It is plainly evident to all mortal men that all things which are seen have 
an end, and things which are not seen are eternal. Wherefore I Cynewalc, 
by royal favour of the Ruler of the throne on high, King of the West Saxons, 
do grant of my own free will in perpetuity a certain portion of land of my 
own private estate, to wit, a hundred hides in the Manor called Duntun, with 
woods, pastures, and all things by custom belonging thereto, with full consent 
of my chief counsellors, for the expiation of my sins and for the well-being 
of my kingdom, to the Church which is founded at Winchester dedicated in 
honour of Saint Peter chief of the Apostles and Saint Paul. Let this aforesaid 
land be free from every burden of land-service, with three exceptions, to wit, 
any duly considered campaign, construction of bridge, or of fortress. And in 
the name of Our Lord I direct that no one of my successors kings bishops or 
princes presume to violate this my donation. Which thing if any one shall have 
transgressed let him know that at the judgment seat of God, before Christ 
and all His Saints, he will have to give account and to suffer eternal punish- 
ment, unless here he shall have taken care by worthy satisfaction quickly to 
amend the wrong he has presumptuously done to God's holy apostles. 

Dis synt ]>a landgemaro to Duntune . Erest of Cradwan Crundel on were- 
]>&n hylle . on fyrdinges leae . on Ebblesburnon to Afene . on pysere . on 
fa fulan lace . on earnesbeserh . on die set beredes trowe . on pone herepa<5 

E-2 



52 The Saxon Boundaries of Dovmton, Wilts. 

to headdan grafe . bonne on bone hagan to witan wyrbe on dyre broc . on 
Avelewe . on ]>a die set hiceles wyrbe . bonne ofer bone feld on hagan ut jmrch 
brember wudu . on bone stenenan stapol . anlang herepabes to fobban wylle . 
anlang herepabes to ?>as hagan ende to fegerhilde forde . on bone hagan 
on ceorles hlawe . on cradan crundul . bonne on ba yferan gemere on Ebbles 
burnan . on Stretford . on hrofan hric . andlang weges . on ba die to bymera 
cumbe . and besbwyres ofer bry crundelas . ofer ba stret . J>wyres ofer ba dune 
to wudu beorch hylle . ofer berigancumb . on Ybblesburnan . on beordune . on 
bes hlinces ende . on bone smalan weg . ofer higcumb . on ban smalan 
wege . on Son stan . on pet heb westeweard . on hone beorh to ban rigwege . 
bonne esest andlang hrigweges to Brit-fordingea landscaere bonne sug on 
Stretford. 

►J» Ego Cynewalc rex hanc donationem meam crucis vexillo corroboravi. 

+ Ego iEthelheard archiepiscopus donum regis eonfirmavi 

+ Ego Hygebeorht archiepiscopus consensum prsebui figens crucem 

+ Ego Ceoluf episcopus 

+ Ego Hathored episcopus 

+ Ego Unwana episcopus 

+ Ego Brord dux 

-f- Ego Lolling prcefectus 

+ Ego Vibald comes 

(The copyist has here hy mistake transcribed a list of attestations 
from some later charter. iEthelheard was Archbishop of Canter- 
bury in 793 ; Hathored, Bishop of Worcester 781—798.) 

The boundaries given in the charters fall into two groups, (A) 
those encircling the detached portion of the Downton Hundred 
which consists of the ancient parishes of Downton and Nunton 
and the extra-parochial Standlynch, (B) those of the parish of 
Bishopstone lying in the other portion of the Downton Hundred. 

I now attempt an identification of the boundaries of the first, or 
Downton portion, in order to show the permanence of our county 
and parochial borders in spite of modern changes. It extends 
on either side of the river Avon, from the Great Yews to Hampt- 
worth, and comprises the present ecclesiastical parishes of Nunton, 
Downton, Charlton All Saints, and Bedlynch, together with Stand- 
lynch, which is extra-parochial and probably was always held as 
a separate manor. It does not include Langley Wood, which is 
now united to the civil parish of Downton. 







ttj 









~il 



tit tmttmj 









..- Of. 



By the Rev. A. Du Boulay Hill. \ 53 

It must be noted, as a general characteristic of Saxon charters, 
that the boundaries given are always those of the whole manor or 
township, whether the grant refers to the whole or only to some 
holdings in it. The total area included in the Downton charter is 
about 18,000 acres, omitting Standlynch. Allowing one-third for 
uncultivated down and marsh-land, and taking the Mansa as the 
normal hide of 120 acres, we have roughly the manor of a hundred 
mansce extending over the whole of the Downton and Bishopstone 
portions except Standlynch. The translation of the charter 
boundaries is here indicated by italics. 

These are the boundaries at Duntun. First from Cradwan Crundel. 
The meaning of Crundel is doubtful. It may indicate a stone 
cairn, or perhaps a quarry or pit dug out in the chalk. I take it 
here as referring to that abrupt termination of Grim's Ditch on 
Wick Down, marked (1) on the plan ; or, even more probably, 
since the boundary here touches the Cawdon and Cadworth 
Hundred, Cradivan Crundel may denote a " Cawdon cairn " as the 
starting point of the circuit. No trace of a cairn remains. 

To Warrior's Hill, to the ford's meadow, to Ebblesburn at Afen. 
The boundary runs north-west to the south corner of the ancient 
wood known as Great Yews (2) passing at least one tumulus. 
Here it turns north-east, passing between Odstock and Nun ton 
Churches, and crossing the river Ebble (3) (or Chalk) follows its 
stream down to the junction with the Elver Avon. 

To the Vetches, to the Muddy Lake. Turning south along the 
Avon (4) at Bodenham, it then crosses the wide river bed now 
occupied by water meadows (5). 

To earnesbeoerh. Bising from the river bank eastward, it traverses 
Witherington Bing and the old stockaded entrenchments called 
The Lynchetts, by an old road known as Pack Bath. I suggest 
that these earthworks may be Earnesbury or Eaglesbury (6). 

To ditch at Bered's Tree, to the Warpath, to Headda's Grave. A 
mile from the Lynchetts it reaches the top of the down, and with 
an abrupt turn strikes the Salisbury and Whiteparish Boad. The 
only evidence of a ditch here perhaps survives in the name of the 
neighbouring parish of West Grimstead (Grimestead) . The 



54 The Saxon Boundaries of Dovmton, Wilts. 

boundary now runs easb for half-a-mile along the road to the point 
where the track to the Pepperbox crosses it. At the top of a 
mound in an angle of the crossing there is a socketted stone known 
as Austin's Cross, which seems to correspond in position to 
Headda's Grave (7). 

Then along the hedge at Witan ivyrth to Water (?) brook, to willoxo. 
From Austin's stone a line of Yew trees is still to be clearly seen 
running south and forming the hedge boundary of Whiteparish (in 
which is unexpectedly preserved the name of Witan-wyrth, or 
Counsellor's Field) (8). This line is continued till it takes up the 
winding course of a stream near New House, the Blackwater (9), 
flowing south to the marshy ground by Langley Wood, where 
willows grow. 

To the ditch at Iiiceles ivyrth. By Langley Wood the stream 
turns and runs east for about two miles to Landford Bridge (10). 
I cannot discover any survival of the name of Hicel's field, there. 

Then across the open field to the Hedge, out through Brembcr Wood 
to the stone post. The boundary leaves the course of the stream 
at Landford Bridge, passing southward straight across Landford 
Common, where it strikes an angle of the county boundary between 
Hants and Wilts (11). Here it turns south-west and follows the 
county boundary, skirting Bramshaw Wood and Bramble Hill till 
it reaches the ridge of the "Telegraph" road (12). The "hedge" 
of the county boundary is now marked by oak posts. 

Along the Warpath to Fobb's spring. Still continuing along the 
county boundary and telegraph road, to the hamlet of North 
Charford on the ridge overlooking the Avon Valley, the edge of 
the Tertiary 'sands is reached. A spring now known as Hobb's 
Well lies about a quarter-of-a-mile from the road and there are 
other springs near (13). 

Along the Warpath to the hedge end at the fair-battle-ford. We 
are now on the route by which Cerdic must have led his army to 
the Avon Valley. The land here falls rapidly, and the boundary 
runs down to strike the Kiver Avon at right angles (14), at the 
site of the famous battle of Cerdices Lord, or Charford (15), where 
in 519, a hundred and fifty years before the granting of this charter, 



By the Rev. A. Du Boulay Hill. 55 

the Saxons won their way across the fair valley of the Avon. 

To the hedge, to Ceorles hlawe. On the other side of the river 
the county hedge is picked up again about three hundred yards 
higher up the stream (16), running still eastwards to Gallows 
Hill (17), the name of which I suggest is really a phonetic modi- 
fication of Ceorles low, or hill (the C having a hard sound). 

To Craclan Crundul. This is the point at which the circuit of 
Downton began (1). 



The remainder of the description refers, I believe, to the 
rectangular area of the present parish of Bishopstone, which forms 
another portion of the Downton Hundred. Though I am not so 
familiar with these boundaries as with those of Downton, I proceed 
to give them with such identification as I am able to add. 

Then on to the upper boundary on Ebblesburn, to Stretford. The 
circuit of Bishopstone begins in the Ebble Valley, at Stratford Tony, 
where the Boman road from Old Sarum crosses the stream (18). 

To Hrofa's Ridge. Going south from Stratford it joins Throope 
drove, reaching the highest point of the ridge at the down barn 
near the Salisbury and Blandford Boad (19). Bockbourn, on the 
southern slope of this ridge, possibly derives its name from Hrofa. 

Along the road to the ditch at Bymera cumb. Continuing along 
the drove it reaches Grim's Ditch at Toyd Clump (20). Here the 
boundary turns and follows the course of Grim's Ditch westward 
for a mile and a half to a point just beyond where the Ditch is 
crossed by the Blandford Boad (21). Here it again turns at a 
right-angle and runs north for four miles, crossing the Boman Boad 
{22) and the Ebble Stream (23) a second time, and then gradually 
rising to the steep ridge of Burcombe Down (24). It is thus 
described in the charter: — thence slanting over three crundels, over 
Hie street, slanting over the down to Wood-bury-hill, over berigan 
(barley) cumb to Ebbles burn, to Beordun. (In No. 2 charter, from 
Hrofa's ridge thus -.—along the vxir-path, to the great ditch, thence to 
Chalk boundary (Broad Chalke), then at Wood-bury-hill, thence to 



56 The Saxon Boundaries of Dovmton, Wilts. 

Ebbles bum and to Beordun.) This description is not quite in- 
telligible. " Slanting " probably refers to the boundary line being 
on the slope of the down. It would be interesting to be able to 
verify the " three crundels " ; I conjecture that they mean the 
abrupt ends of Grim's Ditch between 20 and 21, where the ditch 
may have been originally interrupted by thick wood (Pitt Kivers, 
Excavations in Bokerly, Vol. III., 9.) This explanation seems to 
tally with the Cradwan Crundel in the Down ton boundary (1). 

On Burcombe Down (Beordun) it turns east, to the bank's end 
(perhaps "Hoop-side"; it is called Hafuc Mine — Hawk lynch in 
No. 2 charter) to the little road, over haycumb, to the little road, to 
the stone, to the heath westward, to the barrow at the ridge ivay, (in 
the south-west corner of the Hare Warren) (25). Then eastwards 
along the ridge way to the Britfordingea's boundary, then south to 
Stretford. The present parish of the " Britford people of the 
water," as they are here called, runs up to the race course, about a 
mile to the east of the point marked by a bank (26) at which our 
boundary turns south to Stratford Tony, where the circuit of 
Bishopstone began (18). It is possible that Britford extended 
further west than it does now, across the intervening strips be- 
longing to Stratford Tony and Coombe Bissett, so as to touch the 
Bishopstone boundary where it leaves the ridge way. 

The accompanying map will enable the reader to follow out 
these boundaries from point to point of the ancient charter. Though 
it has gradually passed by exchange or purchase into other hands, 
this manor of a hundred hides was for centuries held by the Bishops 
of Winchester or their lessees, as successors of S. Birinus, by one 
of the oldest title deeds in existence, on the free gift of Cynwalc, 
King of Wessex, to the Church, twelve centuries ago. 



57 



THE MOLLUSCA OF WILTSHIRE. 

By E. W. Swanton. 

[Reprinted, by Icind permission, from the "Journal of Gonchology," xii., 129 
—133, 173—190, April and July, 1908, with Addenda.] 

In 1884 the Conchological Society had not received any shells 
from this county. The census of 1902 tabulated only forty-six 
species — twenty-eight for the north, and thirty-two for the south 
division. Of these, fourteen were recorded for North Wilts only, 
and eighteen for South Wilts; whilst Vitrea cellaria, P. rotundata, 
H. rufescens, U. hispida, H. itcda, H. virgata, Clausilia hidentata, 
Cochlicopa lubrica, Succinea elegans, Planorbis alius, P. umbilicatus, 
Limnma pereger, Bithynia tentaadata, and Sphcerium corneum were 
common to both. Only three slugs — Avion ater, Limax maximus 
and Agriolimax agrestis, found a place in the list, and no Vertigo. 

This remarkable paucity of information tempted me to spend 
part of the summer vacation of 1905 touring in Wilts collecting 
shells. It being unfortunately (from the conchologists's stand- 
point !) a dry season, very few slugs were seen, and only one 
specimen of Vertigo, but I succeeded in adding nineteen species to 
the census records for the northern half of the county, and thirty- 
two to those of the southern half. During the past year much 
additional information was obtained from a valuable little col- 
lection of land and freshwater shells presented to Sir Jonathan 
Hutchinson's Museum at Haslemere by Mrs. F. N. Townsend, the 
widow of the well-known critical botanist. It contained thirty- 
two species, collected in the fifties by Mr. Townsend at Great 
Bedwyn, in the north-east of the county. 

The earliest reference to the shells of Wilts is probably that 
given by John Aubrey, the antiquary, in his Natural History of 
Wilts. It deserves quotation if only for its exceeding quaintness. 
He writes : — 

" Snailes are everywhere ; but upon our dowries, and so in Dorset, 
and I believe in Hampshire, at such degree east and west, in the summer 



58 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

time, are abundance of very small snailes in the grasse and corne, not 
much bigger than small pinnes' heads. Though this is no strange thing 
among us, yet they are not to be found in the north part of "Wilts, nor 
on any northern wolds. When I had the honour to waite on King 
Charles [II.] and the Duke of York, on the top of Silbury hill, his Royal 
Highnesse happened to cast his eye on some of these small snailes on the 
turfe of the hill. He was surprised with the novelty, and commanded 
me to pick some up, which I did, about a dozen or more, immediately, 
for they are in great abundance. The next morning, as he was abed 
with his Dutches, at Bath, he told her of it, and sent Dr. Charleton to 
me for them, to shew her as a rarity." 

Colonel Montagu's " Testacea Britannica " (1803) contains many 
references to Wilts mollusca, as may be gathered from the fact 
that at Lackham alone he found thirty-five species. Lackham is 
four miles east of Corsham, on cornbrash soil, which is always so 
abundant in molluscan life (as I know from experience in East 
Somerset). Here Montagu discovered Clausilia laminata and 
Una montana — the latter he christened Helix laclchamensis. All 
his records are noted in the following list. 

In 1867 Dr. H. P. Blackmore contributed to the tenth volume 
of the Wiltshire Magazine a very valuable paper " On the Recent 
Discovery of Flint Implements in the Drift of the Valley of the 
Avon." Describing the drift at Milford Hill, he remarks : — " Some 
few years since a good section of this drift was exposed on the 
south-eastern side of the hill in a cutting made for the London 
and South-Western Eailway ; and here, near the base of the gravel, 
a narrow seam of loose light-coloured sand containing shells was 
discovered. The shells in this spot existed in the greatest abun- 
dance, and although extremely friable, were generally unbroken. 
They consisted principally of Helix hispida in all stages of its 
growth, a few specimens of Helix arbustorum, and a single indi- 
vidual of Zua subcylindrica. All these shells are terrestrial, and in 
every way agree with examples of the same species still living in 
the adjacent fields." Thirty species were found, one being Succinea 
oblonga, 1 which no longer exists in the district. A series of shells 
from this interesting section may be seen in the Blackmore Museum 
at Salisbury. 

1 See below, in Addenda. 



By E. W. Sioanton. 59 

In the Museum of the Wilts Archaeological and Natural History 
Society at Devizes is deposited a collection of land and freshwater 
shells, made by Miss Anne Cunnington. They were, for the most 
part, collected in the neighbourhood of Devizes, between 1843 and 
1850,and comprise sixty-six species. Localities are given in a manu- 
script book ; these are incorporated in my list, with some necessary 
alterations in nomenclature, and with notification of varieties. 

In addition to the three collections above alluded to, I have also 
examined one formed by Mr. C. D. Heginbothom, who has been 
an assiduous collector for many years in the neighbourhood of 
Devizes. I am specially indebted to him for much kind help in 
the preparation of these notes ; also to my friend, Mr. Thomas 
Baker, of Salisbury, the well-known Wiltshire antiquary. 

Sources from which information has been obtained, additional 
to those already indicated, are given in the Bibliography at the 
end of this paper. 

The greatest length and breadth of Wiltshire are respectively 
54 and 37 miles. Its area is 1,354 square miles, or 866,677 acres. 
The population, as might be expected in a county containing so 
much open pasture land, is remarkably small, being (in 1901) only 
273,845. The soil is chiefly Chalk. A Greensand valley divides 
the Marlborough Downs from the great Salisbury Plain, and both 
are bounded by Greensand on the west. Boughly speaking, a belt 
of Greensand stretches across the county from the neighbourhood 
of Swindon in the north-east to Warminster in the west, and 
separates the north-western third containing the Oolites, from the 
Cbalk, which chiefly constitutes the remainder. The Oolites are 
also exposed in a triangular area in the south-west around Mere 
and Tisbury. Tertiary strata occur in patches near Bedwyn and 
Savernake in the north-east, south-east of Salisbury (around West 
Grimstead), and in the extreme south near Cranborne. , There are 
Quaternary Gravels in the Avon Valley near Salisbury. The 
county is well watered ; the Kennet flows through the Marlborough 
Plain to join the Thames at Heading ; the Somerset Avon drains 
the Oolites of the north-west, whilst the Hampshire Avon passes 
from north to south through Salisbury Plain, from near Devizes 



60 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

to Salisbury, where ifc is joined by its tributaries, the Wyly and 
Nadder (uniting at Wilton), from the south-west. 

The Kennet and Avon Canal forms the separating line between 
the two vice-counties. It enters the county at Hungerford, bending 
to the south-west to Pewsey Vale (Greensand) through which it 
winds a westerly course to Devizes. West of this town it is cut 
through the Oolites, passing successively over Portland Beds, 
Oxford Clay, and Cornbrash, joining the Avon a few miles south 
of Bradford on the western border of the county. 

One-hundred-and-eleven species have been observed. Four of 
these are new records : — Agriolimax Icevis, Milax Sowerbyi, and 
Vallonia excentrica have been added by the writer; Planorbis glaber 
was found by Mr. F. Townsend at or near Great Bedwyn more 
than half-a-century ago, but its occurrence there has not been 
previously published. 

That much work still remains to be done by Wiltshire con- 
chologists is evident from the fact that for no less than fifteen 
species only one locality is known at present. They include the 
above-mentioned new records, also Arion intermedins, Hygromia 
fiosca, Azeca tridens, Vertigo substriata, V. pygmcea, V. avgustior, 
Clausilia rolphii, Amphipeplea glutinosa, Limncea glabra, Pisidium 
nitidum, and P. gassiesianum. 

A thorough exploration of Savernake Forest seems very desirable. 
There is every reason to expect that conchologists would reap as 
rich a harvest as did the mycologists during the visit of the British 
Mycological Society in October, 1903. Here Limax tenellus should 
be specially sought for. 

Testacella maugei (Ferussac).— Very local, apparently only 
around Devizes and in the gardens at Longleat. Southbroom, 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Longleat Gardens, Warminster, J. 
Trollope (Webb, /. of Malac, Dec, 1897, p. 49.) " They are some- 
times found in Devizes, but not in large numbers, and only when 
the gardeners are preparing their ground for crops, or digging up 
their crops; the demand here for them, for the sake only of .their 
palates, is great, and the price high, comparatively. I have bought 
them at a penny each, but since the demand has increased, so has 



By K W. Swanton. , 61 

the price ; I have paid lately sixpence each for them." — (J. J. Fox, 
in Science Gossip, vol. hi., p. 89). 

var griseo-rubescens (Gassies and Fischer). — Longleat 
Gardens, Warminster (J. A. Singer). 

Testacella haliotidea (Draparnaud). — Distribution very local 
as in the preceding species. " The Testacella itself is of rare oc- 
currence, probably because it burrows in the ground in winter, and 
is only above ground at the close of the year. It is found at 
Trowbridge and Devizes, indeed, the winter before last some 
gardener here made a little pocket-money by selling all he found 
at sixpence apiece ; there need be little doubt that those who 
hunt for them would very easily secure numbers, although they 
are considered scarce." — (Vize, in Wiltshire Mag., vol. ix., p. 278). 
Longleat Gardens, near Warminster (J. A. Singer). 

Limax maximus (Linne). — Generally distributed. Stourton, 
Salisbury, Edington (E.W.S.) ; Salisbury, common (Vize) ; Devizes 
(Miss Cunnington) ; Vicarage garden, Steeple Ash ton, 1887 (E. P. 
Knubley) ; Marlborough (Bromehead). 

var. cinereo-niger (Wolf). — Sub-var. vera Dumont and 
Mortillet. Teffont (H. Wyndham). 

var. fasciata (Moquin-Tandon). — Clyffe Pypard (Goddard) ; 
Stourton (E. W. S.) ; Longleat garden, Warminster (J. A. Singer). 
var. sylvatica (Morelet). — Vicarage garden, Steeple Ashton 
(E. P. Knubley); Clyffe Pypard (Goddard). 

Limax flavus (Linne). — Apparently rare. Edington and 
Stourton (E. W. S.) ; Marlborough (Bromehead), Becorded through 
error in the Marlborough list as Arion flavus. 

Limax arborum (Bouchard-Chantereaux). — Probably more 
widely distributed than records indicate. Stourton and Edington 
(E. W. S.); Longleat Gardens, Warminster (J. A. Singer). 

Agriolimax agrestis (Linne).— Widely distributed. Mere, 
Stourton, Salisbury, and Edington (E. W. S.) ; brickearth at 
Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Swindon (Cockerell)-; Marlborough 
(Bi-omehead); very numerous in gardens in damp weather about 
Trowbridge and Salisbury (Vise). 



62 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

Agriolimax Isevis (Miiller). — Eare. Only one station at 
present known, viz., the borders of the ponds at Stourton, where 
1 found it in October, 1893. 

Milax Sowerbyi (Ferussac). Eare. Gardens at Stourton 
below the Church (E. W. S.). 

Vitrina pellucida (Miiller). — Widely distributed. Stourton, 
Edington, and Avebury (E. W. S.) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Warminster, Old Sarum, Ashcombe 
Wood, Salisbury, banks and woods at Devizes (Vize). 

Vitrea crystallina (Mtiller). — Amongst moss in damp situ- 
ations. Common. Stourton, Maiden Bradley, and Edington 
(E. W. S.) ; Hilperton, Salisbury, Devizes (Vize) ; Devizes 
(Miss Cunnington) ; Holocene rain-wash at Little Bedwyn (S. 
Kennard). 

var. contracta (Westerlund) . — Purton Marsh and Braydon 
Woods (J. Going). 

Vitrea cellaria (Miiller). — Widely distributed. Stourton 
Woods and Devizes (E. W. S.) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Swin- 
don (Cockerell) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Corsham,Trowbridge, 
woods at Salisbury and Ashcombe, Devizes (Vize) . 

Vitrea rogersi (B. B. Woodward). — Eare. Devizes (Miss 
Cunnington) ; gardens at Stourton (E. W. S.). 

Vitrea alliaria (Miller). — Evidently widely distributed. Mere, 
Edington, and Avebury (E. W. S.) ; Trowbridge, under chalk stones 
at Warminster, Salisbury, Devizes (Vize) . 

Vitrea nitidula (Draparnaud). — Common. Stourton, Edington, 
Devizes, Melksham, and Avebury (E. W. S.) ; Great Bedwyn 
(Townsend) ; Corsham, North Bradley, Trowbridge, Warminster, 
Salisbury (Vize). 

Vitrea pura (Alder). Apparently rare. Swindon (Cockerell) ; 
Grovely Wood, fairly plentiful (E. E. Thomas). I have taken it 
at Steeple Ashton, and also near Stourton. 

Vitrea radiatula (Alder). — Frequent. Maiden Bradley and 
Melksham (E. W. S.) ; Devizes (Heginbothom) ; brickearth at 
Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; between Box 



By E. W. Swanton. 63 

and Corsham, Salisbury, Devizes (Vize) ; Holocene rain-wash of 
uncertain age at Little Bedwyn (S. Kennard). 

var. viridula (Menke).— Melksham (E. W. S.). 

Zonitoides nitidus (Miiller). — Bare, but abundant where it 
occurs. Always in damp situations. Corsham and Salisbury 
(Vize) ; Aniesbury and Salisbury, amongst sedges on the banks of 
the Avon (E. W. S.) ; Pleistocene fluviatile deposits at Fisherton 
(S. Kennard). 

EuconultiS fulvus (Miiller). — Common throughout the county 
in damp places. Montagu, describing it as Helix trochiformis in 
Test. Brit., p. 427, remarks that " it is a rare shell ; we first observed 
dead specimens amongst the drifted sand in the river Avon in 
Wiltshire ; and afterwards found it sparingly alive in Lackham 
Wood in the same county." Stourton, Edington, and Amesbury 
(E. W. S.); brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Swindon (Cock- 
erell) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Heginbothom) ; Great 
Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Stratford-sub-Castle, Salisbury, Devizes and 
neighbourhood (Vize). 

Arion ater (Linne). — Widely distributed. Stourton, Mere, 
and Edington (E. W. S.) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; ditches be- 
tween Hilperton and Steeple Ashton, and elsewhere about Trow- 
bridge, Salisbury (Vize). 

var. aterima (Taylor) .—Edington (E. W. S.). 
var. alba (Linnd).— Stourton Woods (E. W. S.). 
var. albolateralis (Roebuck). — Salisbury (A. D. E. Bacchus), 
var. marginella(Schranck)and sub-var.nigrescens(Moquin- 
Tandon). — Swindon (Cockerell). 

Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud).— Fairly common. I always 
find it most frequently on Greensand soil. It is common in the 
pine-woods at Stourton. Amongst specimens from this locality 
sent to Mr. W. E. Collinge in October, 1893, was one which he 
styled " var. alteritius." Banks of the Avon at Salisbury and 
Edington (E. W. S.) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; Manton, near 
Marlborough (F. Meyrick). 

Arion intermedius (Normand).— Apparently rare. The only 



64 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

record that I can find is Dinton, near Salisbury (H. Wyndham). 
Arion hortensis (Ferussac). — In gardens and hedgerows in 
villages ; widely distributed. Mere, Stourton, Edington, Salisbury, 
and Amesbury (E. W. S.) ; Salisbury (A. D. P. Bacchus) ; Longleat 
Gardens, (J. A. Singer); Clyffe Pypard (Goddard) ; Salisbury (Vize); 
Marlborough (Meyrick and Bromehead). 

var. grisea (Moquin-Tandon).— Abundant aboutMarlborough 
<F. Meyrick). 

var.subfusca (CPfeiffer).— Garden, Steeple Ashton Vicarage, 

with type (E. P. Knubley) ; around Mere and Stourton (E. W. S.). 

var. nigra (Moquin-Tandon).— Stourton Gardens (E. W. S.). 

Arion fasciatus (Mlsson). — Locally abundant. Pine woods at 
Stourton, Oct., 1893, Melksham and Mere (E. W. S.) ; Clyffe 
Pypard (Goddard) ; Salisbury (Bacchus). 

var. circumscriptus (Johnson). — Edington (E. W. S.). 

Punctum pygmaeum (Draparnaud). — Only two records, but 
is probably fairly common, being frequently overlooked through 
its minuteness. Pare, Salisbury (Vize); brick earth at Fisherton 
(Blackmore) ; Grovely Wood (E. E. Thomas). 

Sphy radium edentulum (Draparnaud). — Pare, only two 
stations at present recorded. Corsham (Vize) ; near Mere (E.W.S.) . 

Pyramidula rupestris (Draparnaud). — Widely distributed on 
old walls. Melksham and Salisbury (E. W. S.) ; Great Bedwyn 
(Townsend) ; brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Bath Eoad, 
near Atworth, Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; walls near Corsham, 
very abundant between Freshford and Westwood, Salisbury, 
Clarendon (Vize). 

Pyramidula rotundata (Muller). — Common. " Under the 
tiles, Lackham House " (Montagu) ; Stourton, Mere, Edington, and 
Amesbury (E. W. S.) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Swindon 
(Cockerell); Corsham, North Bradley, Hilperton, under chalk 
stones at Warminster and Salisbury (Vize). 

var. alba (Moquin-Tandon). — Devizes (Miss Cunnington). 

Helicella virgata (DaCosta). — Widely distributed and very 
abundant especially on the Downs. Montagu remarked that it 



By E. W. Swanton. 65 

" is not uncommon in Wiltshire, but nowhere in such abundance 
as within the influence of saline air" {Test. Brit., p. 417). Great 
Eedwyn (Townsend) ; Swindon (Cockerell) ; Marlborough Downs, 
very common (Bromehead) ; Devizes and Salisbury Plain (Miss 
Cunnington); Corsham, Salisbury, North Bradley, on banks between 
Trowbridge and Bradley, Upton Scudamore, Westwood, Freshford, 
Devizes (Vize). 

var. albicans (G-rateloup).— Devizes (Miss Cunnington and 
Heginbo thorn) . 

var. subalbida (Poiret). — Devizes (Miss Cunnington). 
var. lineata (Olivi). — Downs between Malmesbury and 
Salisbury, Devizes (Heginbothom) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) . 

Helicella itala (Linne) . — Common, especially abundant on the 
Downs. Maiden Bradley, Amesbury, Avebury (E. W. S.) ; Great 
Bedwyn (Townsend) ; very common on Downs near Marlborough 
(Bromehead) : Devizes (Miss Cunnington and others) ; Upton 
Scudamore, Salisbury, and generally on the Downs throughout the 
county (Vize). 

var. leucozona (Moquin-Tandon). — Devizes (Heginbothom). 
var. alba (Charpentier). — Devizes, fine specimens (Hegin- 
bothom). 

Helicella caperata (Montagu).— Widely distributed. Montagu 
observed "We have found it sparingly in Wiltshire" {Test. Brit., 
p. 432). Stourton, Mere, Edington, and Devizes (E. W. S.) ; Great 
Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington, etc.,) ; Corsham, 
Bradford-on-Avon, Upton Scudamore, Warminster, Salisbury 
(Vize). 

var. ornata (Picard).— Devizes (Heginbothom) ; Downs near 
Mere (E. W. S.). 

Helicella cantiana (Montagu).— Evidently very rare. The 
only notices that I can find are:— Bare, near Weyhill, near 
Hungerford, and borders of Wilts (Vize). See Addenda. 

m. sinistrorsum. Mr. J. W. Taylor recorded, in J. of Conch., 
vol. vi., p. 33, that he possessed a specimen, " one of several found 
in Wiltshire by Mr. Kipon, of Norwood." 
vol. xxxvi. — no. cxi. * 



C6 The Mollusca of Wiltshire 

Hygromia fusca (Montagu). — Very rare. Trowbridge (Vize) . 

Hygromia granulata (Alder). — Bare. Among nettles on 

the banks of the Avon at Salisbury ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; 

Salisbury and near Hungerford (Vize) ; plentiful among grass on 

banks of a stream at Wishford (K. E. Thomas). 

Hygromia hispida (Linne). — Widely distributed and abun- 
dant. DaCosta recorded it from "Wiltshire in 1778 under the 
name of Cochlea hispida. Montagu thought it occurred but 
sparingly in Wiltshire {Test. Brit., p. 423). On the banks of the 
Avon at Salisbury, Lacock, Avebury, and Amesbury (E. W. S.) ; 
in the drift at Milford Hill and in brickearth at Fisherton (Black- 
more) ; Swindon (Cockerell) ; Devizes (Heginbothom and others) ; 
Trowbridge, Hilperton, Ereshford, Salisbury (Vize) ; Great Bedwyn 
(Townsend). 

var. hispidosa (Mousson). — Salisbury and Edington(E. W. S.) ; 
Swindon (Cockerell) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; brickearth at 
Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend). 
var. nana (Jeffreys). — Great Bedwyn (Townsend). 
Hygromia rufescens (Pennant). — Widely distributed. Brick- 
earth at Fisherton (Blackmore). 

var. rubens (Moquin-Tandon). — Swindon (Cockerell) ; Salis- 
bury and Lacock (E. W. S.). 

var. albocincta (Cockerell). — Downs between Malmesbury 
and Salisbury (E. W. S.). 

var. alba (Moquin-Tandon) . — Neighbourhood of Salisbury 
(Jeffreys) ; Blunsdon (Cockerell) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Mere and Edington (E. W. S.). 

Acanthinula aculeata (Miiller).— Rare; "In the woods atj 
Lackham " (Test. Brit., p. 430, as Helix spinulosa). Devizes (Misej 
Cunnington) ; rare at Durnford, moist meadows, amongst mossy, 
stones at Devizes (Vize) ; moist woods in Wiltshire (Jeffreys). 

Vallonia pulchella (Miiller).— Widely distributed. Montagif 
wrote of it, " It is most commonly found in rivers and streams oj 
water, after floods, amongst the sand and other refuse brought 
down by the current, having been swept from the neighbouring 






By E. W. Swanton. 67 

wet and swampy situations. It is very plentifully found after a 
flood on the banks of the Eiver Avon, in North Wiltshire, about 
Lackham" {Test. Brit, p. 441, as H. pahtdosa). Stourton, Mere, 
and Edington (E. W. S.) ; brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; 
Devizes (Heginbothom) ; between Trowbridge and Studley, Salis- 
bury, Devizes (Vize) . 

Val Ionia costata (Miiller). — In all probability as widely dis- 
tributed as the preceding species. Edington and Avebury, also 
near Mere (E. W. S.) ; Hilperton Marsh (Vize) ; Swindon (Cock- 
erell) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Heginbothom). 

Vallonia excetltrica (Sterki). — Probably hitherto confused 
with V. pulchella. I found three specimens at Edington, in the 
valley of the White Horse. 

Helicigona lapicida (Linne). Local. DaCosta recorded it in 
1778 as Cochlea acuta "from Wiltshire in the moss on the bodies 
of large trees, and in woods." Devizes, south of Kennet and Avon 
Canal (Heginbothom) ; Marlborough, moderately common (Brome- 
head) ; Corsham, Salisbury (Vize) ; Koundway Hill, Devizes (Miss 
Cunnington) ; Edington (E. W. S.). 

Helicigona arbustorum (Linne.) — Widely distributed. Da- 
Costa recorded it from Wiltshire under the name of Cochlea uni- 
fasciata. Montagu wrote : " It delights in wet and shady places, 
particularly amongst willows and alders where the soil is black 
and boggy. In such places in the neighbourhood of Lackham, in 
Wiltshire, contiguous to the Eiver Avon, it is the most common 
shell, but we have rarely found it elsewhere " (Test. Brit., pp. 414, 
415). A lightish form of the type occurs in nettle beds on the 
banks of the Avon at Salisbury. I have noticed in other places 
its fondness for nettles. A few specimens in the drift at Milford 
Hill and in the brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Devizes 
Miss Cunnington and others ; Idmiston (W. L. W. Eyre) ; Marl- 
borough, moderately common (Bromehead) ; Hilperton, Bradford- 
on-Avon, Alderbury, Salisbury (Vize). 

var. cincta (Taylor). — Banks of the Avon at Salisbury 
(E. W. S.) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Heginbothom). 

F 2 



68 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

var. fuscescens (Duchassaing). — Idmiston (W. L. W. Eyre) ; 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Heginbothom). 

var. canigonensis (Boubee). — Devizes (Heginbothom). 

var. conoidea (Westerlund). — Devizes (Heginbothom). 

var. flavescens (Moquin-Tandon). — Devizes (Heginbothom). 
Helix aspersa (Miiller). — Abundant everywhere. Cockerell 
wrote : " They are largely eaten by the people round Swindon under 
the name of wall snails. I was assured by one who had eaten them 
that they are very excellent. The same practice obtains in East 
Somerset, where they are spoken of as ' wall fish.' " It was at one 
time thought that this species may have been introduced into 
England by the Eomans, as it occurred in many Eoman stations : 
but of late years several undoubted pre-Koman localities have been 
recorded, notably kitchen middens one mile from the present sea- 
shore on the shores of the Mersey, and at Harlyn Bay, in Cornwall. 
Mr. J.W. Flower, F.G.S., has commented upon the fact that it fre- 
quently occurs in British barrows in "Wilts. Three specimens were 
found about 2ft. below the surface during the excavation of a. 
Romano-British dyke, Shiftway Coppice, near Rushmore, by General 
Pitt-Rivers, in November, 1882. They were associated with H. 
pomatia and H. nemoralis, also flint flakes, a spindle-whorl, pottery,. ; 
and bones of domesticated mammals. Six specimens were found ; 
during excavations at Rotherly in 1887. Excavating at Bokerly ; 
Dyke, in 1888, General Pitt-Rivers found one hundred and eighty- i 
three oysters, three fragments of mussels, one hundred and nine 
JET. aspersa, and twenty-four H. nemoralis. " Bokerly Dyke, the ] 
present boundary-line between Dorset and Wilts, is an entrench- ' 
ment of high relief, nearly four miles in length, running in a north- 
wfesfe and south-east direction, across the old Roman road, which j 
runs from Sarum to Badbury." — (Pitt-Rivers). It is not far from | 
Cranborne. Period Romano-British. Occurring in such numbers, ■ 
we may conclude H. aspersa was then an article of food ; and it j 
would seem that the practice of eating it has lingered to the present ] 
day in "Wilts and East Somerset. See " Addenda." 

var. exalbida(Menke). — Around Devizes on both sides of the ' 
Kennet and Avon Canal (Heginbothom.) 



By E. W. Swantoii. 69 

var. flammea (Picard). — Devizes (Heginbothom) ; Collin g- 
bourne (Hasleraere Museum Coll.). 

var. albo-fasciata Jeffreys. — Devizes (Heginbothom); 
Marlborough and Edington (E. W. S.). 

Helix pomatia (Linne). Very local and not abundant. Mon- 
tagu thought it was not indigenous, and believed with the older 
•conchologists that it was first introduced about the middle of the 
sixteenth century either as an article of food or for medicinal 
purposes. He records the finding of " a single specimen near 
Devizes," and adds" which, with those mentioned ^Gloucestershire, 
seems to be their furthest northern limits at present " {Test. Brit., 
p. 407.) Later, it was held that it was introduced into this 
-country by the Romans. Mr. C. N. Bromehead records it on the 
■edge of the forest near Puthall Gate, Marlborough, and adds " these 
molluscs are almost invariably found to occupy the site of a Eoman 
settlement of some kind. It seems likely that, could anyone be 
found willing to excavate, the remains of a villa would be found 
here. The exact position in which the specimens were found is 
the south-east corner of East Croft." It is almost needless to 
remark that the supposition of the introduction of this mollusc by 
the Eomans has been completely negatived by its discovery in 
pre-Boman interments. Three " rather small " specimens were 
found by General Pitt-Eivers at a depth of about 2ft. below the 
surface while excavating a Eomano-British dyke in Shiftway 
Coppice, near Eushmore, November, 1882. They were associated 
with three specimens of H. aspersa and a single H. nemorcdis. 
The Eev. J. E. Vize, in his paper on the land and freshwater shells 
of Wilts, 1 remarks " Helix pomatia is to be found here." Dr. Gray, 
rather singularly, at p. 114, speaking of these shells, asserts that 
" they have been said to be found as far north as Devizes in 
Wiltshire, and in Gloucestershire." His stations are Salisbury 
<rare) and woods near Chilton and Eamsbury. Mr. C. D. Hegin- 
bothom has obtained specimens near Devizes, north of the Kennet 
and Avon Canal, and there are examples in the Museum at Devizes, 

1 Wilts Arch. Mag., vol. x., p. 94). 



70 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

obtained by Mr. Henry Cunnington, on Eoundway Hill, Devizes, 
in June, 1883 ; Gipsy Lane, one mile north of Ogbourne Station, 
1908 (A. D. Passmore). 

Helix nemoralis (Linne). — Generally distributed. Several 
specimens were found by General Pitt-Rivers during his Romano- 
British excavations, viz., in the dyke in Shiftway Coppice, Rush- 
more, one ; at Rotherly, one ; at Winklebury Camp, seven ; in 
Bokerly Dyke, twenty-four; and four during the excavations at 
Wansdyke, four miles north of Devizes. Stourton, Mere, Edington, 
Marlborough (E. W. S.) ; brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; 
Marlborough (Bromehead) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and others);. 
Corsham, North Bradley, Westwood, Salisbury (Vize). 

var. rubella (Moquin-Tandon). — Marlborough (Bromehead) ; 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington and others) ; Stourton, Mere, Edington, 
etc. (E. W. S.). 

var. libellula (Risso). — Devizes(Heginbothom); GreatBedwyn 
(Townsend) ; Stourton and Mere (E. W. S.). 

var. albina (Moquin-Tandon). — Marlborough (Bromehead). 

var.castanea(Moquin-Tandon). — Marlborough(Bromehead);, 
Devizes (Heginbothom) ; Edington (E. W. S.). 

var. olivacea(Risso). — Devizes(Heginbothom);Great Bedwyn 
(Townsend). 

Helix hortensis (Miiller). — Widely distributed, especially 
abundant in hedgerows on the outskirts of towns and villages. 

var. lutea (Moquin-Tandon). — Stourton, Edington, Avebury, 
etc. (E. W. S.); Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Swindon (Cockerell) ;. 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington and others). 

var. arenicola (Macgillivray) . — Edington, Mere, Melksham, 
and Lacock (E. W. S.) ; Swindon (Cockerell) ; Devizes (Hegin- 
bothom). 

var. subalbida (Locard). — Swindon (Cockerell). 

var. olivacea (Taylor). — Great Bedwyn, with raised spire 
(Townsend). 

var. fuscolabiata Von Martens.— Great Bedwyn (Town- 
send) ; Edington, with coalesced bands (E. W. S.). 






By E. W. Swanton. 71 

var. roseolabiata Taylor.— Stourton and Mere (E. W. S.). 
var. incarnata Moquin-Tandon. — Hedges atStourton(E.W.S-)- 

Ena montana (Draparnaud). — The Helix lacTchamensis of 
Montagu, and the "Bulimics lackhamensis, "Wiltshire Twist Shell," 
of Turton's Manual, p. 181. A rare species. " We first found it 
in a moist wood in Lackham, in Wiltshire, in one small spot only, 
adhering to the trunks of ash and hornbeam trees ; and afterwards 
tolerably plentiful in the woods belonging to the Marquis of 
Lansdowne, at Bow Wood, in the same county, not very distant 
from the former place, and in no other part" (Test. Brit., p. 395). 
Woods near Malmesbury (Bromehead) ; Ashcombe Wood, near 
Tollard Boyal, Durnford, and Boundway Hill, Devizes (Miss 
Cunnington and Vize). 

Ena obscura (Muller). — A common species, especially in beech 
woods. We have found it in a moist wood at Lackham, on the 
trunks of smooth-barked trees, such as ash and hornbeam, not 
uncommon" (Test. Brit., p. 392). Near Mere and Avebury 
(E. W. S.) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington 
and others) ; Corsham and neighbourhood, North Bradley, Salisbury, 
Old Sarum, Ashcombe, and Boundway Hill, Devizes (Vize) . 

Cochlicopa lubrica (Muller) . — Widely distributed. A single 
individual in the drift at Milford Hill (Blackmore) ; brickearth at 
Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; Corsham, 
Trowbridge, Salisbury, Devizes (Vize) ; Swindon (Cockerell) ; 
Salisbury, Edington, and Maiden Bradley (E.W. S.). 

Azeca tridens (Pulteney). — Apparently a very rare species. 
I can find but one record ; the Bev. J. E. Vize found it at Clarendon 
Wood. 

Cascilioides acicula (Muller). — An uncommon species, but 
abundant where it occurs. "Have found great abundance 
amongst a variety of shells brought down by the floods in the Biver 
Avon at Lackham" (=Buccinum terrestre, Test. Brit., p. 242). 
Avebury (E. W. S.) ; " in decaying bulbs of tulips at Salisbury. 
The dead shell is frequent" (Vize). 

Jaminia secale (Draparnaud). — Frequent on the Downs 



72 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

throughout the county, especially under stones beneath juniper 
bushes. " We first found it, very sparingly, on an old mossy wall at 
Easton Grey, in Wiltshire, ten or twelve years ago, and never since 
till lately, when we discovered considerable abundance at the roots 
of juniper bushes on the sides of the hills, near Devizes ")== Turbo 
juniperi, Test. Brit., p. 341). Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Devizes 
(Miss Cunnington and others) ; Ashcombe and Durnford (Vize) ; 
Edington, Maiden Bradley, and Mere (E. W. S.) ; Marlborough 
(Bromehead). 

Jaminia cylindracea (DaCosta). — A very local species. 
Salisbury (Vize) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Vize) ; Stourton 
and Edington (E. W. S.). 

Jaminia muscorum (Linne). — Locally abundant. " In great 
abundance among the rejectamenta of the Biver Avon, after floods, 
about Lackham, probably washed from the neighbouring meadows " 
( = Turbo sexdentatus, Montagu in Test. Brit., p. 337, which was 
referred to this species by Jeffreys). Briekearth at Fisherton 
(Blackmore) ; Salisbury (Vize) ; I have taken it at Edington and 
Devizes ; in the latter locality it has been taken by Mr. C. D. 
Heginbothom and others. 

Vertigo antivertigo (Draparnaud) . Bare. It is probable 
that many of the Vertigines are more generally distributed than 
the records would indicate ; they often escape detection through 
their minute size. Stratford-sub-Castle, near Salisbury (Vize); 
Edington (E.W.S.). 

Vertigo substriata (Jeffreys). — Very rare. Specimens from 
Boundway Hill, Devizes, may be seen in Miss Cunnington's Col- 
lection at the Devizes Museum. The Bev. J. E. Vize also records 
it from this locality. 

Vertigo pygmaea (Draparnaud). — Apparently a very rare 
species. The only Wilts station at present known is the banks 
of the Kennet and Avon Canal at Trowbridge (Vize). It is fre- 
quent in East Somerset. 

Vertigo angustior (Jeffreys).— Very rare. The only locality I 
can find mentioned is that given (under Turbo vertigo) by Montagu 



By E. W. Sivanton. 73 

" Rarely amongst the rejectamenta of the Eiver Avon in Wiltshire" 
(Test. Brit., p. 364). 

Balea perversa (Linne). — Local. Montagu vaguely remarks 
"We have taken it in Wiltshire" ( = Turbo perversus, Test. Brit., 
p. 355). Ashcombe, Salisbury (Vize) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Swindon (Cockerel!) ; Edington 
(E. W. S.). 

Clausilialaminata (Montagu). — Widely distributed in beech 
woods. " We have never found it but in Lackham Wood, in the 
north of Wiltshire, and at Bow Wood, the seat of the Marquis of 
Lansdowne in the same county" (= Turbo laminatus, Test. Brit., 
p. 360). Clarendon, Ashcombe, Devizes (Vize) ; Devizes (Miss 
Cunnington and others) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; Warminster 
and Stourton (E. W. S.). 

var. albina Moquin-Tandon. — Devizes (Heginbothom). 
Clausilia biplicata (Montagu). — This rare British shell, oc- 
curring only in three counties, has been recorded from three 
Wiltshire stations. " We first discovered this species sparingly at 
Easton Grey in Wiltshire" (= Turbo biplicatus, Test. Brit, -p. 361). 
Alderbury, near Salisbury (Maton) ; Boundway and Durnford 
(Vize) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Clarendon, near Salisbury 
Bridgman, in Jeffreys' B.C., vol. L, p. 283). 

Clausilia bidentata (Strom). — Widely distributed. Great 
Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Corsham, Maiden Bradley, Warminster 
(Vize); Devizes (Miss Cunnington and others) ; Swindon (Cock- 
erell) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; Stourton, Mere, Avebury, etc. 
<E. W. S.). 

var. tumidula (Jeffreys). — Swindon (Cockerell), 

Clausilia rolphii (Leach). — A very rare species which has 
hitherto been observed only on the downs near Devizes, where it 
has been taken by Mr. C. D. Heginbothom. Specimens in the 
Haslemere Museum labelled " near Devizes " were probably 
collected in the same locality by the late Mr. F. Townsend. 

Succinea putris (Linne), — Apparently widely distributed. 
Corsham, canal banks on weeds, stones, etc. ; between Trowbridge 



74 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

and Steeple Ashton, near the reservoir of the canal at Devizes, and 
Salisbury (Vize) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Heginbothom) ; 
in wet meadows near first milestone on Swindon Road, Marlborough 
(Bromehead) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; the Avon at Salisbury 
(E. W. S.) 

Succinea elegans (Risso). — Not so common as the preceding 
species. Devizes and Salisbury (Vize) ; brickearth at Fisherton 
(Blackmore) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Stourton, garden pond, 
etc. (E. W. S.). 

var. pfeifferi (Rossmassler). — By the canal, Swindon 
(Cockerell) ; Fisherton, brickearth (Blackmore) ; Devizes (Miss 
Cunnington). 

Succinea oblonga (Draparnaud). — Specimens from the Fish- 
erton brickearth, collected by Dr. H. P. Blackmore, may be seen 
in the Blackmore Museum at Salisbury. See " Addenda." 

Carychium minimum (Midler).— Widely distributed. "We 
have found it in several parts of Wiltshire, particularly in Lackham 
Wood, and in drifted sand of the River Avon " {=Turbo carychium, 
Test. Brit., p. 339). Brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; roots 
of grass at Roundway, Salisbury (Vize) ; Swindon (Cockerell) ; 
Edington and Marlborough (E. W. S.). 

Ancylus fluviatiiis (Muller).— A very local species. Brick- 
earth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; canal reservoirs at Devizes, 
Salisbury (Vize) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington). 

Acroloxus lacustris (Linne) .—Locally abundant. " We have 
found them tolerably plentiful in a "fishpond at Lackham, in 
Wiltshire, and in the River Avon, on the stalks of the yellow 
water lily ; but is rarely, if ever, found in rapid water, in which 
the fluviatiiis seems most to delight" (= Patella lacustris, Test. 
Brit, p. 484). Ponds near Lavington, Salisbury (Vize) ; stream 
at Amesbury(E. W. S.); Lavington and Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; 
Swindon (Cockerell). 

var. moquiniana (Bourguignat).— Swindon (Cockerell). 
Limnaea auricularia (Linne).— Widely distributed in the 

two Avons and in the canals. " We have found it of a superior 



By E. W. Swanton. 75 

size in the Kiver Avon, in the north of Wiltshire " (= Helix auricu- 
laria, Test. Brit., p. 376). Swindon, "in the canal and elsewhere, 
apparently as common as L. peregra in the district. One specimen 
approached variety ampla " (Cockerell); Devizes (Miss Cunnington 
and Heginbothom) ; Trowbridge, Salisbury (Vize) ; half-mile N.W. 
of Man ton House, Marlborough (Bromehead). 

Limnaea pereger (Miiller).— A common species. Very fre- 
quent in any likely places and varying in size according to circum- 
stances " (Vize) . The Helix limosa which Montagu found " sparingly 
in the Eiver Avon " was probably a form of this species. Brick- 
earth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Avon 
at Salisbury, Stourton, Devizes, Amesbury, etc. (E. W. S.). 

var. vulgaris (G. Pfeiffer).— Stourton and Amesbury 
(E. W. S.). 

var. lutea (Montagu). — Edington (E. W. S.). 
m. scalariforme. — Warminster (Jeffreys). 

Limnaea palustris (Miiller). — Widely distributed. North 
Bradley, Trowbridge, Salisbury, Devizes (Vize) ; brickearth at 
Fisherton (Blackmore); Elcot Mill, Marlborough (Bromehead); 
Swindon (Cockerell) ; stream at Amesbury, Avon at Salisbury 
(E. W. S.). 

Limnaea truncatula (Miiller).— A common species. Brick- 
earth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; numerous in a ditch at Corsham 
at the end of Lord Methuen's Park, Salisbury, Devizes, Hunger- 
ford (Vize) ; Marlborough (Bromehead) ; Amesbury and Avebury 
(E. W. S.). 

var. elegans (Jeffreys). — Devizes (Miss Cunnington). 

Limnaea Stagnalis (Linne). — Locally abundant. Montagu's 
Helix fragilis is probably the var. fragilis ; he remarks "The only 
place in which this has ever occurred to us is the canal intended 
to make a junction of the Kennet and Avon, between Chippenham 
and Laycock. Many that were collected from that water were 
all of the same slender shape, and in the younger shells there were, 
in all we examined, a few opaque white lines, crossing the smaller 
volutions. The largest measured an inch-and-a-half in length and 



76 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

not quite three-quarters-of-an-inch wide in the largest part " (Test. 
Brit., p. 369). Devizes (Miss Cunnington and others) ; Trowbridge 
(Vize) ; Swindon (Cockerell) ; Marlborough, in pond one mile north 
of Chase Woods, Elcot Mill, Flashy Pond (Bromehead) ; Avon at 
Salisbury (E. W. S.). 

var. fragilis (Linne). — Pond three hundred yards west of 
north end Tunnel, Elcot Mill (Bromehead) ; Kennet and Avon 
Canal (Montagu). 

Limnaea glabra (Mliller). — The inclusion of this — the rarest 
British representative of the genus — in the Wiltshire list rests 
upon half-a-dozen specimens in the Townsend Collection 
(Haslemere Museum) labelled " Great Bed wyn," probably collected 
in the year 1850, and upon Jeffreys' record {B.C., i, 118). It 
is the Helix octanfracta of Montagu. 

Amphipeplea glutinosa (Miiller). — Very rare. Salisbury 
(Yize). 

Planorbis corneus (Linne). — A rare and local species. Bare 
at Salisbury, where Dr. Blackmore thinks it was probably imported 
(Vize) ; canal near Wroughton, Marlborough (Bromehead). 

var. albida (Moquin-Tandon). — Canal at Cricklade (Brome- 
head) . 

Planorbis albus (Miiller). — A common species. "It is one 
of the most common of the compressed species of Helix:; it is 
plentiful in the Kiver Avon about Lackham, as well as in the 
fishponds ; and in many other places in the same county, especially 
at Wedhampton, in ditches and ponds, of a superior size " (=Hclix 
alba, Test. Brit., p. 459). Swindon, one specimen measuring diam. 
7iy mm., alt. 2 mm. (Cockerell) ; canal at Trowbridge and Devizes, 
on cases of caddis- worms, Salisbury (Vize) ; Great Bedwyn (Town- 
send) ; Stourton (E. W. S.). 

Planorbis glaber (Jeffreys.) — This species, of which most 
British records are from northern counties, was found by Mr. 
F. Townsend at or near Great Bedwyn in 1851. Presumably he 
obtained it, as well as L. glabra, from the Kennet and Avon Canal. 

Planorbis crista (Linne). — A rare species. " Of a larger size 



By E. W. Swanton. 77 

than usual in a pond at Wedhampton, in Wiltshire, with the Helix 
alba. Diameter one-eighth of an inch" {= Helix nantileus, Test. 
Brit., p. 466). Devizes (Hegiubothom) ; ponds near Lavington 
and Devizes, Salisbury (Vize). 

Planorbis carinatus (Miiller). — Frequent in the two Avons 
and the Kennet Canal. " We first discovered it in the Eiver 
Avon about Lackham, but all dead and 'bleached white, which 
seems to be the character of this shell in natural state. We do 
not, however, believe, they inhabit that river, but are brought into 
it in the time of floods, though we could never find it elsewhere, 
amongst the other species, which is common in the neighbourhood " 
[=Helix carinata, Test. Brit., p. 453). Brickearth at Fisherton 
(Blackmore) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; Kennet and Avon 
Canal, on weeds at Trowbridge, Salisbury (Vize) ; Swindon (Cock- 
erell) ; Elcot Mill, Marlborough (Bromehead) . 

Planorbis umbilicatus (Miiller) . — Apparently not so widely 
distributed as the preceding species. In a ditch between Trow- 
bride and Studley ; Salisbury, and canal at Devizes (Vize) ; Swindon 
(Cockerell) ; Amesbury, and streams near Avon at Salisbury 
(E. W. S.). 

Planorbis vortex (Linne). — A frequent species. Swindon 
(Cockerell) ; very abundant near Corsham and Trowbridge, North 
Bradley, and canal at Devizes (Vize) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; 
on caddis cases in ditches adjoining Avon at Malmesbury(E. W. S.) . 
Planorbis spirorbis (Linne). — Common. Brick earth at 
Fisherton (Blackmore) ; stream in lower part of Butts Valley, 
Marlborough (Bromehead) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and others), 
Swindon (Cockerell) ; Kennet and Avon Canal, Stratford-sub- 
Castle, Salisbury, Steeple Ashton (Vize) ; Amesbury (E. W. S.) . 

Planorbis contortus (Linne).— Locally abundant. "It is 
rather a local species, but we have found it not uncommon in the 
River Avon about Lackham, after floods, having been swept from 
the ditches in the neighbouring meadows, where it is found alive 
in abundance" (=Helix contorta, Test, Brit, p. 458). Swindon 
(Cockerell) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; stream at Amesbury, 
Avon at Salisbury, and Edington (E. W. S.). 



78 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

Planorbis fontanus (Lightfoot).— A frequent species. "We 
have found it sparingly in the ditches about Wareham, in Dorset- 
shire, and near the village of Wedhampton, in Wiltshire, but have 
observed it in greater abundance in a fish-pond at Lackham, in the 
same county, and in the river contiguous, adhering to aquatic 
plants, frequently deep in the water " (= Helix fontana, Test. Brit. 
p. 463). 

Segmentina nitida (Miiller).— A rare species. There are 
specimens in the Cunnington Devizes Collection, and in the 
Townsend Collection from Great Bedwyn in the Haslemere 
Museum. The Eev. J. E. Vize found "one shell after many 
searches near the canal bridge on the Trowbridge and Bradford 
Boad," and also recorded it from the canal at Devizes. 

Physa fontinalis (Linne), — Abundant in the canal at Trow- 
bridge, splendidly fine on the Trowbridge and Bradford Boad, 
Drew's Bond, Devizes, and Salisbury (Vize) ; there are Devizes 
specimens in Miss Cunnington's Collection ; Elcot Mill,Marlborough 
(Bromehead) ; Edington and Amesbury (E. W. S.). 

Aplecta hypnorum (Linne). — A local species. "In Wiltshire 
of an extraordinary size, measuring nearly three-quarters of an 
inch. In a pond, subject to be overflowed by the Avon in that 
county, we have seen great abundance, and in the same field were 
plenty of the B. fontinalis, and yet they had never communicated 
with each other, for in neither place were they to be found to- 
gether" (Bulla hypnorum, Test. Brit., p. 229). Large size at 
Corsham, sparingly and small on the Hilperton and Steeple Ashton 
Boad ; Trowbridge, very abundant, and Salisbury (Vize) ; Edington 
and Avebury (E. W. S.). 

Bithynia tentaculata (Linne). — A common species. Swindon 
(Cockerell) ; abundant in the Kennet and Avon Canal in winter and 
summer, Salisbury and Devizes (Vize); Idmiston, one with a spiral j 
band of distorted epidermis (W. L. W. Eyre) ; Kennet and Avon 
Canal near Elcot Mill (Bromehead) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington) ; 
brickearth at Fisherton (Biackmore) ; Amesbury (E. W. S.). 

Bithynia leachi (Sheppard). — Apparently a very rare species, | 



By E. W. Swanton. 79 

occurring only in two localities. Salisbury and Devizes (Vize). 
Specimens from the latter place are in Miss Cunnington's collection. 
Vivipara vivipara (Linne). — Locally abundant, but certainly 
not a common species. So very abundant at certain seasons that 
they can be collected in great numbers from the Kennet and Avon 
Canal at Trowbridge, canal at Heybrook, and Devizes (Vize) ; 
canal at Cricklade, canal near Wroughton, Marlborough (Brome- 
head). 

Valvata piscinalis (Miiller). — A common species. "We have 
found it in various parts of Wiltshire, especially in the Avon, and 
in the moat round the old castle at Marlborough" ( = Turbo 
fontinalis, Test. Brit., p. 349). Canal reservoirs at Devizes (Vize) ; 
brickearth at Eisherton (Blackmore) ; stream at Amesbury, Calne, 
and Salisbury (E. W. S.). 

Valvata cristata (Miiller.). — A very local species. "Not 
uncommon in drifted sand in the Eiver Avon with the last (Pla- 
norhis alius), and sometimes on aquatic plants, but more plentiful 
in a ditch near Wedhampton in Wiltshire ; it may, however, be 
considered as rather a scarce, or at least, a very local species " 
(—Helix cristata, Test. Brit., p. 461). Canal at Trowbridge, 
Salisbury (Vize); Edington and Amesbury (E. W. S.). 

Pomatias elegans (Miiller). — Widely distributed on the 
chalk. In the woods at Lackham (Montagu); Boundway Hill, 
Salisbury (Vize) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Heginbothom) '; 
Edington and Marlborough (E. W. S). 

var. albescens (Des Moulins) . Gully on south side of Oare 
Hill, near Marlborough (Bromehead). 

var. pallida (Moquin-Tandon) . — Lane on the south side of 
Kennet, opposite Mildenhall, near Marlborough (Bromehead). 
var. ochroleuca (Moquin-Tandon) . — Devizes (Miss Cunning- 
ton and Heginbothom). 
Acicula lineata (Draparnaud). A rare species. Dr. Blackmore 
found it in the brickearth at Fisherton, and the Bev. J. E. Vize 
on roots of grass at Upavon. See Addenda. 
Neritina fluviatilis (Linne).— Avery local species. On stones 



80 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

in the Canal at Trowbridge, Salisbury (Vize) ; Dr. Maton also re- 
corded it from Salisbury ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; canal at 
Devizes (Heginbothom) ; common in stream, Mere (E. Baker). 

Dreissensia polymorpha (Pallas). — Apparently confined to 
the Kennet and Avon Canal. Very abundant near Trowbridge in 
the canal, and reservoirs and canal at Devizes (Vize) ; Devizes 
(Miss Cunnington and Heginbothom). 

Is any thing known of the introduction of this species into the 
Kennet and Avon Canal ? It is supposed to have been imported 
into this country in or about the year 1824. Within twenty years 
of that date it was reported from two counties in Scotland and 
thirteen in England. It was unknown to the Bev. J. E. Vize, who 
contributed a list of the Land and Freshwater Shells of Wilts, in 
1863, to vol. ix. of the Wilts Arch. Mag., or, at least, he makes no 
reference to it. In the 1889 Census List of British Non-Marine 
Mollusca it is recorded from twenty-one counties and vice-counties 
in England and two in Scotland. In the 1902 Census it is given 
under twenty-five English — including S. Devon, N. Somerset, 
Surrey, and Middlesex — and four Scotch. Wilts must now be 
added to the list, and specimens have been sent to the Society's 
Becorder. There are no records from Wales and Ireland. " The 
Dreissena is perhaps better fitted for dissemination by man and 
subsequent establishment than any other freshwater shell ; tenacity 
of life, unusually rapid propagation, the faculty of becoming at- 
tached by a strong byssus to extraneous substances, and the power 
of adapting itself to strange and altogether artificial surroundings 
have combined to make it one of the most successful molluscan 
colonists in the world " (H. Wallis Kew, in " Dispersal of Shells," 
p. 219). 

Unio pictorum (Linne). — Apparently a local species. At the 
present time it has been recorded only from the Kennet and Avon 
Canal and its reservoirs at Devizes (Vize and Heginbothom). 

Unio tumidus (Retzius). — Becorded from the northern part 
of the country only ; has not, as yet, been observed south of the 
Kennet and Avon Canal. Canal at Devizes (Miss Cunnington and 
Vize); canal at Swindon (Cockerell) ; canal atWantage(Bromehead). 



By E. W. Sivanton, 81 

var. ovalis (Moutagu). — ''This very strong variety is not 
uncommon in the Avon that runs through the north of "Wiltshire 
and Somersetshire, inhabiting the deeper parts of the river "(=Mya 
ovalis, Test. Brit., pp. 34 and 563). From the Avon and Froome, 
Wiltshire (Turton, as Mysca ovata). 

Anodonta cygnaea (Linne). — Widely distributed in the canal, 
and occurs in all the largest ponds. Numerous in the canal at 
Trowbridge, canal at Devizes, the moat at Britford, Longleat (Vize) ; 
canal at Wantage (Bromehead) ; canal at Devizes (Heginbothom) ; 
Stourton ponds and Longleat (E. W. S.). 

var. incrassata (Sheppard). — This shell we found in great 
abundance in the Biver Avon about Lackham " (=Mytilus 
avonensis, Test. Brit., p. 172). " Miss Bennett, of Norton House 
favoured me lately with specimens from Tisbury, Wiltshire. They 
were old shells, and the animal having lived in water highly im- 
pregnated with chalk and calcareous matter, its epidermis has been 
secreted so rapidly and increased the shell so much in thickness 
that the Linnean character ' testa fragilissima ' is entirely lost " 
(Gray's Turton, p. 292). Specimens from the Norton House 
garden pond, labelled " grown to this size by good living," may be 
seen in the Cunnington Collection at the Devizes Museum. Mr. 
J. W. Taylor remarks : "A characteristic specimen of this variety 
from a brook at Tisbury, Wiltshire, kindly given to me by the 
late Mr. J. Pickering, weighs 2,227 grammes, or 512 ounces, while 
an example of the typical form of equivalent size from Nagden, 
near Faversham, collected by the late Miss E. B, Fairbrass, weighed 
only 322 grains, or about one-seventh the weight of the variety 
incrassata" (Mon. L. & F. W. Moll, i., 79). 
Sphaerium rivicola (Leach). — Locally abundant. " Frequently 
i to be found at certain seasons in the canal at Trowbridge, Milford 
near Salisbury, canal at Devizes " (Vize); Devizes (Miss Cunnington 
and Heginbothom) ; Salisbury Avon (E. W. S.). 
Sphazrium corneum (Linne). — A common species. Canal at 
' Trowbridge (Vize) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Swindon (Cock- 
! erell) ; Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Vize) ; ponds at Stourton, 
i and Avon at Salisbury (E. W. S.). 

i VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. G 



82 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

Sphaerium lacustre (Miiller.) — Widely distributed. Swindon 
(Cockerell) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Drew's Pond, Devizes 
(Miss Cunnington and Vize) ; Salisbury, Edington, Avebury, and 
Amesbury (E. W. S.) 

var. ryckholti (Normand.) — Swindon (Cockerell) ; " the type 
of S. lacustre was very common at one place, but only one of var. 
ryckholti was found (measuring 6x6 mm.)" 

Pisidium amnicum (Miiller). — A common species. "Dr. 
Maton, who first defined it as a distinct member of our fauna, 
obtained his specimens from the Avon, near Salisbury, and Montagu 
from the North Avon " (Forbes & Hanley, Brit. Moll., vol. ii., p. 134) . 
Canal at Trowbridge, Milford near Salisbury (Vize) ; canal at 
Devizes (Miss Cunnington and Vize); Elcot Mill, Marlborough 
(Bromehead) ; brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Stourton, 
Salisbury, Edington, and Amesbury (E. W. S.). 

Pisidium henslowianum (Sheppard). — A local species. 
Milford near Salisbury, Drew's Pond, Devizes (Vize) ; Great 
Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Edington (E. W. S.) 

Pisidium subtruncatum (Malm).— Very local. Swindon 
(Cockerell) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend) ; Stourton (E. W. S.). 

Pisidium pusilium (Gmelin). — Locally abundant. North 

Bradley, Harnham Meadows, Salisbury (Vize); Swindon (Cockerell); 

brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Great Bedwyn (Townsend). 

var. cinerea (Alder). — Great Bedwyn (Townsend); North 

Bradley and one or two other localities near Trowbridge (Vize). 

Pisidium nitidum (Jenyns).— Very rare. Elcot Mill, near 
Marlborough (Bromehead). 

Pisidium obtusale (Pfeiffer).— Very rare. Kecorded only 
from the neighbourhood of Salisbury. Milford, Salisbury (Vize) ; 
brickearth at Fisherton (Blackmore) . 

Pisidium gassiesianum (Dupuy). Very rare. There are 
specimens from Great Bedwyn in the Townsend Collection at the 
Haslemere Museum. 

Pisidium pulchellum (Jenyns) .—Locally abundant. Brick- 
earth at Fisherton (Blackmore) ; Milford near Salisbury, and 



By E. W. Swanton. 83 

Drew's Pond, Devizes (Vize) ; Stourton, Edington, and Amesbury 
(E. W. S.). 

In all probability the last four species have a much wider distri- 
bution than the above records indicate. 



Species Erroneously Eecorded for Wilts. 

The H cartusiana in the Cunnington Collection at Devizes are 
H. cantiana. Bulimus ventrosus (= Helix acuta) in Bromehead's 
list of shells from the neighbourhood of Marlborough should have 
been Cochlicopa lubrica. 



Addenda. 

Since the foregoing notes were published in the Journal of 
■Conchology I have received the following interesting communication 
irom Dr. H. P. Blackmore, of Salisbury : — 

" You may like to hear that Helix cantiana occurs at two spots 
close to Salisbury. I fancy this species has been brought from 
Weyhill Fair, both localities are by roadsides, where flocks of sheep 
pass from Andover. Testacella haliotidea also occurs here — it was 
first noticed on the site of an old nursery garden, so it was probably 
introduced in the soil with plants. Some years ago I turned out 
three in the garden at the back of my house, and this year I find 
they have increased considerably, and are not difficult to find if 
hunted for with a lantern at night. 

" The best evidence of Helix aspersa being indigenous to England 
occurred at Dewlish, in Dorset, in 1898. When examining the 
Pliocene gravel of this locality I accidentally came upon an un- 
disturbed bed of sand 4 or 5 feet in thickness of Holocene age. 
This sand contained a large number of land shells, amongst them 
nine examples of Helix aspersa. 

" Succinea oblonga can no longer be reckoned as foreign to this 
district. I met with it at Alderbury in a damp gravel pit in 
1890, and have since occasionally seen it in the same place, but it 
is not abundant there." 

G 2 



84 The Mollusca of Wiltshire. 

The Eev. B. E. Thomas, in a recent paper on "The Mollusca of 
Wiltshire," 1 records (1) the taking of a single specimen of the 
rare Acme lineata " in a small wood on the downs between 
Wroughton and Wootton Bassett in July, 1903. (2) The variety 
pellucida of Clausilia laminata " several specimens under the bark 
of some dead trees in an orchard at Wroughton in July, 1903. 
(3) Zonites punts, together with the variety margaritacea in Grovely 
Woods. (4) Buconulus fulvus in Grovely Woods. (5) Punctum 
pygmaeum, two specimens " on dead beech leaves at Grovely." 

The variety margaritacea of Vitrca (=Zo7iites pura) is an ad- 
dition to the list given in my paper. 



Bibliography. 

1778. DaCosta, E. M. : Historia Naturalis Testaceorum Britannia;, 
or The British Conchology. Beferences to Wiltshire, 
pp. 56, 59, and 76. 

1803. Montagu, George ; Testacea Britannica, or Natural History 
of British Shells. Contains many references. 

1807. Maton, W. G., and Backet, T. : Descriptive Catalogue of the 
British Testacea. Trans. Linn. Soc., vol. viii., p. 17. 
Many references to the records in the Testacea Britannica. 

1822. Turton.Dr.W.: ConchyliainsularumBritannicarum. Befer- 
ences on pages 241 and 246. 

1833. Jeffreys, J. Gwyn : Supplement to the Synopsis of Testaceous- 
Pneumonobranchous Mollusca of Great Britain. Trans. 
Linn. Soc, vol. xvi., pp. 507, 511. 

1840. Turton, Dr. William : A Manual of the Land and Fresh- 
water Shells of the British Lsles. John E. Gray's Edition, 
Wiltshire notes on pages 181 and 292. 

1843. Maton, Dr. W. G. : His Notes on " The Natural History of a 
part of the County of Wilts comprehended vnthin the 
distance of ten miles round the City of Salisbury " contain, 
under the heading of Vermes, references to seventeen 
species of Land and Freshwater Shells. 

1 Read at the Salisbury meeting of the Wilts Arch. Soc, 1908. 



By E. W. Stvanton. 85 

1853. Forbes & Hanley : History of British Mollusca. Eeferences 
vol. ii., pp. 118, 134; and vol. iv. p. 90. 

1862. Jeffreys, J. Gwyn : British Conchology. Several references 

in the first volume. 

1863. Vize, Eev. J. E. : Notes on Land and Freshwater Shells of 

Wilts. Wilts Arch. Mag. vol. ix., p. 87. List of shells 
on p. 278. 

1871. Woodward, Dr. Samuel: Manual of Mollusca. Second 
edition. Note concerning T. Maugei on p. 298. 

1886. Cockerell, T. D. A.: Contributions totvards a list of North 
Wiltshire Mollusca. J. of Conch., vol. vi., pp. 82 — 84. 
Enumerates forty-two species and varieties taken in the 
neighbourhood of Swindon. 

1887—1898. Pitt-Kivers, Lieutenant-General, F.R.S., D.C.L. : 
Excavations in Cranborne Chase, Bokerly JJyke, and 
Wansdyke, four vols., privately printed. References to 
mollusca in Romano-British settlements. 

1892. Swanton, E. W. : List of Mollusca collected in the Wincanton 
District. Wincanton Field Club Reports, No. 3, 1892. 
References to Mere and Longleat. 

1894. Taylor, J. W. : Monograph of the Land and Freshwater 
Mollusca of the British Isles. Several references in vol. ii. 
chiefly to specimens collected at Clyffe Pypard by the 
Rev. E. H. Goddard. 

1903. Bromehead, C. N. : List of Mollusca found in the Neighbour- 
hood of Marlborough. Report of the Marlborough College 
Natural History Society for the year ending Christmas, 
1903. Enumerates thirty-six species and eight varieties. 

1906. Swanton, E. W. : A Pocket Guide to the British non-marine 
Mollusca, including fossil forms which occur in the Post- 
Pliocene Deposits, excepting the Forest Bed Scries. Refer- 
ences, p. 7l. 



86 



ON NEOLITHIC FLINTS LYING BELOW THE PEESENT 
SUEFACE AT DINTON. 

By The Eet. G. H. Engleheabt, F.S.A. 

I have, on the north side of the Nadder Valley, at Dinton, an 
eleven acre field, stretching from the foot of the abrupt greensand 
ridge for something over two hundred yards downwards to the 
south. About four-and-a-half acres of this is in spade cultivation 
for bulbs and fruit trees. The remainder has been arable, under 
corn and root crops, until last spring, when I sowed it down to 
permanent grass. 

Of the four-and-a-half acres, one long strip was double dug when 
I first came here, i.e., the second spit of soil was broken up as 
well as the top, making a total depth dug of some 18 inches. 
Finding less benefit than I had expected from this deep digging, 
we now dig only one spit, i.e., an ordinary spade's depth, say 9 inches. 

I reckon that the six-and-a-half acres under farm cultivation 
has not been disturbed deeper than about 4 inches by the plough. 

We have, therefore, portions dug to three several depths, i.e. : — I 
A., by the plough, 4 inches. 
B., „ „ spade 9 „ 
O, „ „ „ 18 „ 

I find the number of worked flints found on my ground to vary 
directly with the depth. On the strip dug to 18 inches (C) they 
are very abundant, less so on the larger stretch of ground du 
only to one spade's depth, or about 9 inches (B), and very few on 
the acreage which has been cultivated by the plough only (A). 

In the adjacent fields on the same side and slope of the valle; 
the flints are few, as in my own ground which has been only 
ploughed. The fact of this difference is curiously established by 
the following experience : — In searching a field separated from 
mine only by a hedge, I found some half-a-dozen worked flakes 



On Neolithic Flints bclovj the present surface at Dinton. 87 

lying within a small area. In the rest of the field, though I paced 
it over very carefully, I did not find one. On considering the 
matter I remembered that these flakes occurred in a strip which 
the farmer had given to his men to grow their potatoes on, and 
therefore had been spade-dug some inches deeper than the rest of 
the field. 

Out of a very much larger number I have selected some two 
hundred flakes from the four-and-a-half acres mentioned, quite 
two-thirds being from the most deeply-dug strip. And we 
found well over a hundred of these last autumn, because I have 
only lately given special attention to the matter and taught my 
men to distinguish and collect these flints. Whenever we plant 
or lift a fruit tree, put in a gatepost, or in any way touch the 
ordinarily undisturbed subsoil, we are almost sure to find one or 
more. 

It is, therefore, clear to me, that by our deep cultivation — ex- 
ceptional in the valley — we touch upon the original gitc of these 
tools, which, I think, lie in their original gite very much more 
thickly than is usually supposed. What are ordinarily found on 
. the surface are only the small percentage brought up by earth- 
worms, burrowing animals, draining, &c, &c. It is curious that 
this consideration of the ancient surface on which such implements 
must for the most part lie does not seem at all dwelt upon in 
Evans' and other books on the subject. 

We have, so far, found no flints either wholly or partially ground ; 
all are chipped tools or flakes. They are mostly rough, but oc- 
casionally a nicely-worked knife or arrow-head is found and many 
carefully shaped " scrapers." Their patina is very noticeable, so 
that by their smooth appearance and feel even the roughest can be 
distinguished from natural flakes, and all from implements such as 
are ordinarily found on the surface. 

I thought at first that there might have been some hut- 
settlement within the area of my field. I find, however, no pottery, 
pot-boilers, or other remains indicative of habitation, and now 
feel tolerably sure that the flints were dropped by people ranging 
along the valley side where it shelved up from the flat river 



88 By the Rev. G. H. Englekeart,F.S.A. 

meadows, which were probably a shallow lake or swamp in 
Neolithic times. 

Some of the flints are so very rude and some so finely worked 
that they probably extend, in their series, over a long period of 
time. 

It is true that the conditions which apply here at Dinton would 
only be found in similar localities on the sides of valleys, where 
the accretion of washed down soil is large. On the uplands, and 
more particularly on the chalk, the added humus since Neolithic 
times is very little, and tools then deposited are almost or quite 
within reach of the plough. 

But the implements dropped on such highlands must be ex- 
clusive of those dropped by hunters wandering and squatting 
along the valleys. The downs and hill tops were probably pretty 
well as bare of cover, and therefore of game, as they are now. It 
must have been on the wooded slopes above the marshes and below 
the bare heights — as here along the sides of the Nadder Valley — 
that most of the flints were lost and broken and discarded over a 
very long period. Implements used to procure and prepare daily 
food must form a large proportion of the sum total, and on such 
soils as that at Dinton all but a very small part must lie on a 
surface nob ordinarily disclosed. The almost certainty of finding 
such flints whenever the soil hereabouts is dug deeper than usual 
is most striking. It occurred to me to search some ground on the 
opposite side of the valley which has been steam ploughed, and is 
therefore as exceptional in depth of disturbance as is my double- 
dug plot on this side. The excess of implements found there over 
those from land ploughed in the ordinary way proved no less than 
that recorded from my plot. The same notable excess from steam- 
ploughed areas has been observed at Tackley, Oxfordshire, whence 
some remarkable specimens have been added to the Pitt-Rivers 
Museum in Oxford. 

Most of the implements fall into the classes of knives and scrapers. 
Distinctly fashioned arrowheads are rare here; possibly, as suggested 
by Evans, they were usually made of bone in many districts. 
Flakes with gouge-like notches of varying aperture, perhaps for 



On Neolithic Flints below the present surface at Dinton. 89 

shaping shafts, spits, and pins, are exceedingly common. Most 
abundant of all are the so-called scrapers, varying considerably in 
form and probably in use. Many of these are very well chipped, 
with a deep obtuse edge formed by a multitude of small facets. 
Many are long-shaped, with notches on the sides as if for tying them 
to handles. If the chief use of these tools was the scraping of skins, 
their widely-scattered abundance suggests that each animal was 
flayed and its skin dressed as it was taken. Skins and the means 
of preparing them must, of course, have been in very great demand 
before the invention of woven clothing. 



90 

THE SOCIETY'S MSS. 

(Continued from Vol. xxxv. p. 496.J 

QUIDHAMPTON. 

East of Clyffe Pypard and Broad Town on the same northern 
escarpment of the Marlborough downs we come to Quidhampton. 
Some account of the place will be found in Wiltshire Notes and 
Queries, vol. i., pp. 311 — 314, and of successive holders here in the 
History of Castle Combe. It came into the possession of the Benet 
family in 1648, and the title deeds relating to it, and to certain 
adjoining lands in Can Court and Costowe, are set out in the 
"abstract " already referred to (vol. xxxv., p. 460). Both "schedule" 
and " abstract " are in this instance intact, and by the gift of Mr. 
Mullings the Society is also in possession of some forty of the 
original documents from which the "abstract" was compiled. 
These are printed below, in nearly every instance in extcnso. 
Where the original is wanting, the summary of it, given in the 
" abstract," is included. Even thus the account is by no means 
complete. At every stage of this long history there is matter for 
comment and for explanation. For the present, however, it will 
be more convenient to hold such notes over, so as not to over-weight 
what, as here set down, is an unusually complete title. 

The first entry in the " abstract " is as follows : — 

52 H. 3, 1268. By lease de Heyweye demises to the Abbott & 

Covent of All the lands in Quidhampton for 12 years. 

The full text of this chirograph is appended : — 

(1) 
12 March. Hec. est conuencio facta Anno Domini M° C°C° LX° 
A.D. 1268-9. octauo. die beati Gregorii. pape. inter Abbatem et Con- 
ventual de Stanlegh ex parte una et Bicarduni de 
Hyweye ex altera, videlicet quod. Bicardus predictus concessit et 
tradidit ad firmam. dictis Abbati et Conventui totam terrain de Qued- 
hampton quam habet in eadem. cum domibus redditibus seruiciis 






<r^U I* Iff! ! Mf lit 







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ft-fell-ri &-! 1 i 




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The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 91 

pratis pasturis et omnibus aliis rebus et libertatibus ad dictam 
terrain pertinentibus. ad terminum duodecim annorum proximo subse- 
quencium. pro sex viginti marcis sterlingorum. de quibus dictus 
Eicardus. recepifc premanibus. a. dictis Abbate et Conventu. sexaginta 
marcas. et sexaginta marcas recipiet ab eisdem. die dominica proxima 
post Hockeday proximo sequentem. Habendum et tenendum dictis 
Abbati et Conuentui. de dicto. Ricardo et heredibus suis assignatisque 
suis. libere quiete. pacifiee et integre. vsque ad complecionem dictorum 
duodecim annorum, faciendo et acquietando. scutagiuni. Hydagium 
Tallagium et cetera honera. debita et consueta infra dictum terminum, 
ad dictam terram spectancia. Hoc excepto. quod dictus. Eicardus. et 
heredes. sui vel assignati sui. dictam terram. ab omnimodis sectis 
curiarum Hundredorum. et comitatuum defendent et acquietabunt. 
Predicti. uero. Abbas et Conuentus. sustentabunt interim domus. quas 
receperunt. et eas reddent in fine prefati termini in eodem statu quo. 
eas receperunt. nisi alieno incendio. uel infortunio eas contigerit deperiri. 
uel uetustate fuerint consumpte. In fine eciam. prefati termini videlicet 
duodecimo anno, recipiet dictus. Eicardus. ad Purificacionem pasturam 
suam cum warecto. Ita. quod dicti Abbas et Conuentus nihilominus. 
plenarie recipient duodecimum Croppum cum dimidietate tocius feni. 
prato bene et more solito ab ingressu omnium animalium custodito. 
Hanc autein terram cum domibus redditibus seruiciis pratis pastuiis 
libertatibus et omnibus aliis rebus ad eandem pertinentibus. dictus. 
Eicardus et heredes sui uel sui assignati. dictis Abbati et conuentui. per 
prefatum terminum duodecim annorum contra omnes mortales warrant- 
izabunt. Et si contigerit quod infra prefatos duodecim annos. pro 
defectu waranti de Sectis. curiarum. Hundredorum. Comitatuum. 
dampna incurrerint dicti Abbas et Conuentus, dictus Eicardus et heredes 
sui uel sui assignati. omnia in fine predicti termini plenarie restituent. 
vel dicti Abbas et Conuentus dictam terram tenebunt. per extensionem 
ipsis prius factam. donee per visum legalium homiuum dampna que 
incurrerint plenarie restituantur et eleuentur. Preterea si contingat 
quod aliquis infra prefatum terminum releuium racione predicte 
terre exigat a dictis Abbate et Conuentu. dictus. Eicardus et heredes 
sui ipsos Abbatem et Conuentum. sine vlla contradictione acquiet- 
abunt. Item in fine duodecimi anni. ad Hockeday. dictus Eicardus 
recipiet aulam suam et boueriam. cum ilia parte curie videlicet 
uersus occidentem. et tota altera pars curie cum gardino columbario. 
et cum ceteris pertinenciis penes Abbatem et Conuentum. remanebunt. 
Hanc igitur convencionem concessionem et tradicionem. tarn dicti Abbas 
et Conuentus. quam dictus Eicardus pro se et heredibus suis firmiter et 
sine dolo obseruandam. fideliter compromiserunt. In cujus rei testi- 
monium, presenti scripto in modo cyrographi confecto. singna sua 
alternatim apposuerunt. Hiis Testibus. Dominis Willelmo de Cain et 
Eoberto Blwet Militibus. Eogero Pippard. Henrico Bartholomeo. Willelmo 
Quinctin. Thoma de Doddeford. Anketill et multis ALJJS. Seal of 
Abbey, broken. 

No. 84 of Society's MSS. 



92 The Society s MSS. Quidhampton. 

Not till 1324 is the property dealt with in these deeds, described 
■as a manerium. The lessor above speaks of " all the land of Qued- 
hampton which he has in the same." The last clause expressly 
determines that " at the end of the twelfth year at Hockeday the 
said Eichard shall receive his hall and ox-house, with that part of 
the court, viz., towards the west ; and all the other part of the 
court with the garden dove-house and with the rest of the appur- 
tenances shall remain in possession of the abbot and convent. 

It would certainly appear from this clause that the property 
was divided, and that whereas the abbot and convent were just 
taking a lease from Richard de Hyweye of his part, they were 
already in possession of the residue, or of some portion, at any 
rate, of the residue, by some different title. Thus at the outset 
we are met by a difficulty. It is very unfortunate that the originals 
of the next two deeds set out in the "abstract" are missing. 
Possibly if we had the full text our difficulty might resolve itself, 
for the first of them shows William de Hey weye (son and heir, pre- 
sumably, of the above Eichard, who is here described as " knight ") 
acquiring some further estate of lands in Quidhampton : — 

(2) 
Ait the feast of St. Barnaby [11 June] 32 Edw. j. 1304. An Agreem 1 - 
between Agnes the Eelict of Rich d , Pig on the one part and W m . de 
Heyweye son & heir of Richard de Heyweye Knt. on the other part viz' 
that the s d . Agnes did give and grant to the s a . William 

All her land in Quidhampton with the rents wards 
releifs escheats & all other the appurtenances. 
To hold to the said William his heirs & assignes for the term of 
100 years att the rent of 14 marks to be paid halfe yearly during the life of 
the s d . Agnes And after the decease of the s d . Agnes the s d . land 
should remaine to s d . W m . & his heirs or assignes free from any payment 
saveing to the s d . Agnes her freebord during her life. 

The 11th June in the year 1304, fell on a Thursday. On the 
following Sunday, according to the "abstract," William de 
Heyweye made over his estate in Quidhampton to his son 
Eichard : — 

(3) 
Sunday next after the feast of St. Barnaby 32 Edw. j. 1304. An 
Agreement between William Lord Heyweye on the one part and Richard 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 93 

his son & heir on the other part thereby the s d . William did give & grant 
to the s d . Eichard 

All his land w* 1 ' he had in the village of Quidhampton 
w' h the rents and profits thereof. 
To hold to the s d . Richard his heirs or assignes for the term of 100 
years att the rent of 14 marks halfe yearly for the life of Agnes the 
Eelict of Rich d . Pigg. And after the death of the s d . Agnes that y* 
land should remaine to the s d . Richard his heirs & assignes free from 
the s d . payment saveing to the s d . W m . his freebord in all the lands for 
the life of the s d . Agnes. 

The above two deeds may refer to a family transaction, repre- 
senting the surrender by a widow for instance of her life estate 
for the benefit of her grandson. In this case either the " abstract"' 
is misleading or the form of the documents most unusual. Grant- 
ing this, the lands in question would be the same lands previously 
leased by Eichard de Hyweye to the abbot and convent. They 
may, on the other hand, refer to a genuine purchase. In this case,, 
and if the rent reserved is any gauge of the extent of the property 
conveyed, they refer presumably to the lands which, at the end of 
the lease, were to remain to the abbot and convent, and it may 
further be inferred that the abbot and convent's interest in them 
was only leasehold. 

From this point, for some little way on, we possess the originals 

of all the documents mentioned in the " abstract." The sequence of 

events appears to be that at some time between 1304 and 1317 

Agnes Pig, if that was indeed her name, died, and Eichard de 

Hyweye, under his father's grant, entered into full possesion of 

ithe lands in Quidhampton. He thereupon, probably in 1317, 

leased them to one John Goudhyne, of Marlborough, for life. The 

! instrument by which this was effected was apparently missing 

when the Benets acquired the property. At any rate it does not 

appear in the "abstract" and no original exists. On 12th 

August, 1317, John Goudhyne took a confirmation of his term 

: from William de Hyweye, the father. Of this release two originals 

exist, the only difference between them, with the exception of 

some slight variations of spelling, is in the seals. To the one is 

: appended a " device," to the other an indifferent impression of an 

! ill-cut seal of arms. The legend round the latter is " S.WILLI. 



94 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

DE HEYWEIE," the arms, possibly, six ermine spots, arranged 

three, two and one, with in chief a crescent. The text of the 

release, with variant spellings, bracketed, from the version with 

the " device," follows : — 

(4) 
12 Aug. Pateat universis per presentes, quod ego "Willelmus de 
A.D. 1317. Hyweye [Hiweye] remisi et quietum clamavi Johanni 
Godhyne [Goudhyne] de Marleberg totum jus et clamium 
quod habui in omnibus terris et tenementis que habui in Quedhamton 
[Quedhamptone] que Eicardus filius meus tenuit et quepredicto Johanni 
Godhyne [Goudhyne] ad terminum vite dimisit Ita quod nee ego nee 
aliquis nomine meo quicquid juris vel clamei de cetero exigere poterimus 
vel vendicare durante termino predicto In cujus rei testimonium pre- 
senti scripto sigillurn meum apposui Hiis testibus Petro Bluet Galfrido 
de Weston Johanne Tornay Johanne de Chilton [Chiltone] Eoberto de 
Colcote [Colecote] Willelmo de Kameshulle Thoma de Polton et aliis 
Datum apud Marleberg duocecimo die Augusti Anno Eegni Eegis 
Edwardi filii Eegis Edwardi undecimo. 

Nos. 85 and 86. 

The lease by Richard de Hyweye to John Goudhyne was pro- 
bably by way of security for money advanced, and the transaction 
of the nature of mortgage. Some years later, for the sum of 200/., 
which probably represents the original advance and arrears of 
interest, Richard de Hyweye sells outright to Goudhyne. The 
form of the feoffment is dictated by the circumstances of the 
purchaser. It is to him and the lawful heirs of his body, whom 
failing to Geoffrey, his son, in tail, with remainder in default to his 
own right heirs. Geoffrey Goudhyne, that is to say, was born out 
of wedlock : — 

(5) 
9 May Sciant presentes et futuri quod Ego Eicardus de Hyweye filius 
A.D. 1324. Willelmi de Hyweye dedi concessi et hac presenti carta mea 
confirmaui Johanni Goudhyne de Marleberg pro ducentis libris 
sterlingorum quas dedit michi premanibus omnia terras et tenementa 
mea in Quedhamptone in parochia de Elyndon tarn in dominicis quam 
in serviciis tarn villanorum quam liberorum cum omnibus suis pertinen- 
ciis. Habendum et tenendum omnia predicta terras et tenementa dicto 
Johanni et heredibus de corpore suo legitime procreatis vt in mesuagiis 
terris, tenementis, pratis, redditibus, pascuis pasturis, homagiis fedelita- 
tibus, heriettis, releuiis, escaetis, reuersionibus et seruiciis tarn liberorum 
quam villanorum et cum omnibus aliis consuetudinibus, predictis terris 
et tenementis quoquo modo spectantibus de capitalibus dominis feodi 



The Society's MSS. Qitidhampton. 95 

illius per seruicia inde debita et consueta libere quiete integre bone et in 
pace iure hereditaria- imperpetuum. Et si contingat quod dictus Johannes 
obierit sine herede de corpore suo legitime procreato, tunc omnia terre 
et tenementa predicta cum omnibus pertinenciis suis integre remaneant 
Galfrido Goudhyne filio ejusdem Johannis tenenda sibi et heredibus de 
corpore suo legitime procreatis de capitalibus dominis feodi illius per 
seruicia inde debita et consueta libere quiete integre bene et in pace iure 
hereditario imperpetuum. Et si contingat quod predictus Galfridus 
Goudhyne obierit sine herede de corpore suo legitime procreato tunc 
omnia terre et tenementa predicta cum omnibus pertinenciis suis integre 
remaneant rectis heredibus predicti Johannis Goudhyne tenenda eisdem 
de capitalibus dominis feodi illius per seruicia inde debita et consueta, 
libere quiete integre iure hereditario imperpetuum. Et ego vero JRicardus 
de Hyweye antedictus et heredes mei omnia predicta terras et tenementa 
cum omnibus suis pertinenciis quibuscumque sicut predictum est, predicto 
Johanni Goudhyne et heredibus de corpore suo legitime procreatis in 
forma predicta contra omnes mortales warantizabimus et defendemus 
imperpetuum. In cuius rei testimonium presentem cartam impressione 
sigilli mei roboraui Hiis testibus Domino Willelmo de Hardene milite, 
Galfrido de Westone, Willelmo de Bameshulle, Johanne de Berewyk, 
Petro Portebref, Rogero de Stotescombe, Eogero Waz, Johanne Tornay, 
Johanne de Chiltone, Roberto de Colecote, Waltero le Blak et multis 
aliis. Datum apud Marlebergh die Mercurij proxima post festum Sancti 
Johannis ante portam Latinam. Anno regni regis Edwardi filij regis 
Edwardi decimo septimo. Seal, perhaps lamb and flag, with legend. 

No. 87. 

On this occasion also John Goudhyne took a release from 

William de Hyweye, the father, and for greater security, a similar 

i release from Adam de Hyweye, son of William and brother of 

I Eichard : — 

(6) 
i 19 May. Pateat universis per presentes quod ego Willelmus de Hyweye 
A.D. 1324. remisi relaxavi et penitus quietum clamavi imperpetuum 
pro me et heredibus meis Johanni Goudhyne de Marlebergh 
totum jus et clamium quod habeo vel habui seu aliquo modo habere 
poterro in omnibus terris et tenementis in Quedhamptone in parochia 
de Elyndone que Ricardus de Hyweye filius meus tenuit et que idem 
Ricardus dimisit predicto Johanni Goudhyne tenenda ad terminum vite. 
Ita quod nee ego nee heredes mei nee aliquis nomine meo in predictis 
terris et tenementis aliquid juris et clamii decetero exigere vel 
vendicare poterimus. Et ego predictus Willelmus et heredes mei totum 
predictum manerium de Quedhamptone cum omnibus pertinenciis suis 
quibuscunque predicto Johanni Godhyne heredibus et assignatis suis 
contra omnes mortales warantizabimus et defendemus imperpetuum. 
In cujus rei testimonium presentibus sigillum meum apposui. Hiis 
testibus Domino Willelmo de Hardene milite Galfrido de Westone 



96 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

Willelmo de Bameshulle Johanne de Berewyk Johanne Tornay Johanne 
de Chilton Koberto de Colecote et aliis Datum apud Marleberg die 
Sabbati in festo Sancti Dunstani Episcopi Anno Eegni Gegis Edwardi 
filii regis Edwardi Decimoseptimo. Seal, perished. No. 88. 

(7) 
19 May, Pateat universis per presentes quod ego Ada {sic) de Hyweye 
A.D. 1324. filius Willelnii de Hyweye remisi et omnino quietum clamavi 
imperpetuum pro me et heredibus meis Johanni Godhyne de 
Marleberghe et heredibus suis vel suis assignatis totum jus et clameum 
quodcumque habeo vel habui seu aliquo modo habere potero infuturum 
in omnibus terris et tenementis cum pertinenciis suis que Eicardus de 
Hyweye frater meus habuit ex dono predicti Willelmi patris mei in 
Quedhamptone in parochia de Elyndone. Ita quod nee ego nee heredes 
mei nee aliquis nomine meo in terris et tenementis predictis aliquid 
juris vel clamii decetero exigere vel vendicare poterimus In cujus rei 
testimonium presentibus sigillum meum apposui. Hiis testibus Petro 
Bluet Galfrido de Westone Johanne Tornay Johanne de Chilton. 
Boberto de Colecote Willelmo de Bameshulle Thoma de Polton Johanne 
Trippe Johanne Huest et aliis Datum apud Marleberg die Sabbati in 
festo Sancti Dunstani Episcopi Anno Begni Begis Edwardi filii regis 
Edwardi decimoseptimo. Seal, a device. No. 89. 

The next document is a feoffment by John Goudhyne of his 
lands, &c, " in the hamlet of Quedhamptone in the parish of 
Elyngdone " to his son Geoffrey, in tail, subject to an annuity of 
10 marks, with remainder in default to John le Busshe, of Clatford, 
clerk, his nephew or grandson, in tail, with reversion in default 
to himself and his assigns : — 

(8) . 
27 Dec. Sciant presentes et futuri quod ego Johannes Godhyne de 
A.D. 1326. Marleberge dedi concessi et hac presenti carta mea confirmaui 
Galfrido Godhyne filio meo omnes terras et tenementa mea - 
cum omnibus et singulis pertinencijs suis in villata de Quedhamptone 
in parochia de Elyndone tarn in dominicis quam in seruiciis, quequidem 
habui ex dono et concessione Bicardi de Hyweye, Habendum et tenendum 
predicto Galfrido et heredibus de corpore suo legittime procreatis omnes 
terras et tenementa predicta, ut in mesuagijs terris tenementis pratis, I 
redditibus, pascuis, pasturis, homagijs, fidelitatibus, heriectis, escaetis, 
reuersionibus, et seruicijs tarn liberorum quam villanorum et cum om- 
nibus alijs consuetudinibus predictis terris et tenementis quoquo modo 
spectantibus de capitalibus dominis feodi illius per seruicia eisdem debita 
et de iure consueta libere quiete integre bene et in pace iure hereditario i 
in perpetuum. Beddendo inde michi predicto Johanni Godhyne per totam 
vitam meam tantum annuatim in festo Natiuitatis Sancti Johannis 
baptiste, quinque marcas sterlingorum, et in festo Sancti Michaelisl 
quinque marcas sterlingorum. Et si contingat predictum Galfridum I 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 97 

absque aliquo herede de corpore suo legittime procreato superste (sic) 
descedere quod absit, Extunc post mortem suam omnes terre et 
tenementa predicta cum omnibus et singulis pertinenciis suis ut 
supradictum est integre remaneant Johanni le Busshe de Clatford 
clerico nepotimeo. Habendum et tenendum eidem Johanni et heredibus 
de corpore suo legittime procreatis de capitalibus dominis feodi illius 
per serviciainde debita et de iure consueta libere quiete integre bene etin 
pace iure hereditario in perpetuum. Et si predictus Johannes le Busshe 
absque herede de corpore suo procreato superste obierit (sic) quod absit, 
Extunc statim post mortem eius sine impedimento seu contradictione 
•cuiuscumque persone, omnes terre et tenementa predicta cum omnibus et 
singulis pertinenciis suis quibuscumque reuertantur et integre remaneant 
michi dicto Johanni Godhyne et assignatis meis in perpetuum. Et ego 
vero predictus Johannes Godhyne et heredes mei omnes terras et tene- 
menta predicta cum omnibus et singulis pertinenciis suis quibuscumque 
prenominato Galfrido et Johanni Busshe et heredibus eorundem in forma 
predicta contra omnes mortales warentizabimus et in perpetuum de- 
fendemus. Et preterea si predictus Galfridus Godhyne in solucione 
supradicti annui redditus in parte vel in toto ad terminos prefixos seu 
quando per me antedictum Johannem Godhyne seu per alterrum quem- 
cumque nomine meo post terminos solucionis elapsos idem Galfridus uel 
easdem terras et tenementa tenens fuerit requisitus inde aliquo modo 
defecerit, quod absit, tunc sine contradictione cuiuscumque persone statim 
liceat michi pacifice ingredi omnes terras et tenementa predicta cum 
omnibus pertinenciis suis in quibuscumque manibus pro tunc fuerint, et 
eadem optinere ad meos usus proprios et de eisdem libere disponere pro 
voluntate mea donee de toto redditu prediclo et de dampnis misis 
et expensis si que fecero ob causam perquirendi redditum predictum 
fuerit michi plenarie satisfactum. In cuius rei testimonium presentem 
cartam sigilli mei impressione roboraui. Hijs testibus Willelmo de 
Rameshulle tunc constabulario castri Marlebergh'. Waltero Menaunt 
tunc maiore libertatis burgi Marlebergh'. Johanne Trippe. Galfrido 
Aldwyne. Johanne Torney. Johanne de Chyltone. Boberto de Colcote. 
Rogero "VVaz. Ada Barlast. Petro Portebreif. Waltero le Blak. Johanne 
Cosyn. et multiis alijs. Data apud Marlebergh' die Sabbati in festo 
Sancti Johaimis apostoli et Euangeliste. Anno regni regis Edwardi filij 
regis Edwardi vicesimo. Seal, a device, tvith leg/end, S. IOHIS 
GODHINE No. 90. 

Three years later Geoffrey Goudhyne leased all his lands in 
" Quedhampton in the parish of Elindon," to Eobert Eussell the 
younger, of North Lydyerd, for life, at 10/. rent : — 

(9) 

13 Oct. Nouerint vniuersi quod ego Galfridus Goudhyne filius Johannis 
A.D. 1329. Goudhyne de Marlebergh tradidi et dimisi et hac presenti 
scripto meo confirmaui Boberto Russel juniori de North 
VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. H 



98 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

Lydyerd omnes terras et tenementa mea in Quedhampton in parochia de 
Elindon tarn in dominicis quam in seruiciis et curn omnibus aliis perti- 
nenciis suis quibuscuinque. Habendum et tenendum omnes terras et 
tenementa predicta supradieto Koberto ad totam vitam ipsius Eoberti 
vt in mesuagiis terris et tenementis pratis redditibus pascuis pasturis 
homagiis fidelitatibus releuiis eschaetis herietis reuersionibus et seruiciis ] 
tarn liberorum quam villanorum et cum omnibus aliis consuetudinibus 
predictis terris et tenementis quoquo modo spectantibus de me heredibus 
seu assignatis meis quibuscumque faciendo capitalibus dominis feodi illius 
seruicia inde debita et consueta. Et reddendo inde annuatim michi ] 
Galfrido heredibus seu assignatis meis decern libras sterlingorum ad 
duos anni terminos videlicet ad festum Natiuitatis Sancti Johannis 
Baptiste centum solidos et ad festum Sancti Michaelis centum solidos. I 
Et insuper predictus Robertus infra terminum sibi preconcessum ad 
proprios custus omnes terras et tenementa predicta sustentabit etl 
reparabit et eadem videlicet terras et tenementa in adeo bono statu quo j 
ilia recepit uel meliori dimittet michi heredibus uel asignatis meis sine : 
strepitu lite contradiccione seu impedimento aliquali. Et ego vero j 
predictus Galfridus heredes uel asignati mei predicta terras et tenementa 1 
cum omnibus suis pertinenciis predicto Roberto ad terminum vite sue vt j 
predictum est contra omnes mortales warantizabirnus et defendemus. j 
In cuius rei testimonium huic scripto indentato sigilla predictorum j 
Galfridi et Roberti alternatim sunt apposita. Hiis testibus Johanne 
Torney. Johanne Bryan. Johanne Thouky. Edmundo de Mordon. 
Ada Colyns et aliis. Datum apud Lydyard die Veneris proxima post , 
festum sancti Dionisii. Anno regni regis Edwardi tercii post conquestum 
tercio. Seal of arms, a lion rampant, in chief a cross (?) between iwo\ 
mullets of six points, with legend, S. GALFRIDI GODHINE. 

No. 91. 

Five years later, in 1334, on the occasion of a distant journey, 

Geoffrey Goudhyne appointed his father his attorney to receive the 

rent of 9/, {not 10/.) from Kobert Eussell for his "manor in. 

Quedhamptone " : — 

(10) 

9 July Omnibus et singulis ad quorum noticiam presentes peruenerint j 
A.D. 1334. Galfridus Godhyne filius Johannis Godhyne de Marleberg 
salutem in domino Quia quedam ardua negocia in quibusdani , 
partibus remotis aggredi propono. quare uniuersitati vestre innotesco me | 
fecisse loco meo ordinasse et constituisse per presentes. Johannem j 
Godhyne patrem meum predictum attornatum meum ad recipiendum et 
pro uoluntate sua optinendum post diem confeccionis presencium ilium 
anuum redditum nouem librarum sterlyngorum quern scilicet redditum | 
Robertus Russel junior de North Lydierd soluere michi consueuit ad duo 
festa anni et conferre tenetur videlicet ad festum Nativitatis Sancti 
Johannis Baptiste et ad festum Sancti Michaelis per equalesporcionespro 
manerio meo in Quedhamptone simul et pro terris et tenementis atque aliis 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 99 

ad idem spectantibus. que quidern eidem dimisi per quoddam scriptum 
indentatum inter nos confectum. Dans vero eidem Johanni Godhyne 
patri meo predicto omnem potestatem meam in omnibus predictum an- 
nuum redditum tangentibus agendi prosequendi versus eundem Robertum 
Russel quocienscumque in solucione predictarum nouem librarum 
sterlyngorum siue in parte uel intoto ilium contigerit deficere. vltra 
predicta festa distinete assignata donee de predicto redditu. dictarum. 
nouem. librarum sibi fuerit totaliter satisfactum. Insuper remitto eidem 
Johanni Godhyne patri meo et attornato penitus omne jus meum et 
clameum. quodcumque habeo vel habui seu quouis modo habere potero 
in illo anuo redditu prenominato nichil inde michi uel aliquibus nomine 
meo reseruando infuturum In quorum omnium testimonium supra- 
dictorum presentibus sigillum meum est appensum Hiis testibus Willell- 
mo de Bameshulle. Johanne de Poltone. Roberto de Colcote. Johanne 
de Chilton. Johanne Bryan et multis aliis. Date apud Quedhamptone 
die Sabbati proxima post festum translacionis Saneti Thome Archi- 
episcopi et Martiris. Anno regni Regis Edwardi tercij. a conquestu 
octauo. Seal of arms, as above. 

No. 92. 

Two months later in the same year, by the description of 
Geoffrey Godhyne, son of John Godhyne of Merleberge, mer- 
ihant," he re-enfeoffed his father of " all that my manor in Qued- 
jiamptone within the parish of Elyndone " : — 

(H) 
7 Sept. Seiant presentes et futuri quod ego Galfridus Godhyne nlius 
A.D. 1334. Johannis Godhyne de Merleberge mercatoris dedi concessi et 
hac presenti carta mea confirmaui dicto Johanni Godhyne 
patri meo totum illud mannerium meum in Quedhamptone infra 
paroehiam de Elyndone cum omnibus terris et tenementis gardinis pratis 
pascuis et pasturis redditibus et seruiciis tarn liberorum quam villanorum 
et eorum liberis consuetudinibus columbariis viuariis una et cum aliis 
quibuscumque pertinenciis suis quod quidem manerium predictum terras 
et tenementa et singula alia prenominata cum pertinenciis eorundem 
habui ex dono et concessions predicti Johannis Godhyne patris mei 
Habendum et tenendum supradictum manerium et omnes terras et 
tenementa gardina et prata cum pascuis et pasturis redditibus et seruiciis 
tarn liberorum quam villanorum et eorum consuetudinibus columbariis 
viuariis wardis releuiis escaetis maritagiis homagiis reuersionibus et cum 
omnibus quibuscumque aliis ubique pertinenciis suis predicto Johanni 
Godhyne et heredibus uel assignatis suis de capitalibus dominis feodi 
illius per seruicia annuatim inde sibi debita et consueta libere quiete et 
integre bene et in pace iure hereditario imperpetuum. Et ego vero 
predictus Gafridus (sic) Godhyne et heredes mei totum predictum 
manerium in Quedhamptone et omnes terras et tenementa gardina et 
prata cum pascuis et pasturis redditibus et serviciis tarn villanorum quam 

H 2 



100 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 



lis 



liberorum et eorum consuetudinibus columbariis viuariis wardis releuiii 
escaetis maritagiis homagiis reuersionibus et cum omnibus et singul 
aliis quibuscumque vbique pertinenciis suis sicus (sic) predictum est pre. 
dicto Johanni Godhyne patri meo et heredibus seu assignatis eius contra 
omnes gentes mortales warantizabimus defendemus inperpetuum In 
cuius rei testimonium presentam (sic) cartam impressione sigilli mei 
roboraui. Hiis testibus. Eoberto de Colcote Bogero Aas de Hentone 
Johanne de Chiltone Johanne Bryan. Bogero de Walecote. Willelmo; 
de Bameshull. Henrico Fraunkelayn. Johanne Cardeville. Bicardo' 
de Wynterborne mercatore et multis aliis. Data apud Quedhamptone- 
die Mercurij proxima post festum Sancti Egidij Abbatis anno regni reg j 
Edwardi tercij a conquestu octauo. Seal of arms as above. 

No. 93. 

Being thus again in possession John Godhyne three years later J 
enfeoffed Robert Eussel of all his lands, &c., in " Quedhampton 1 
next Benknolle," which he had " by the gift and feoffment of i 
Eichard de Hyweye " : — 

(12) 
13 May Sciant presentes et futuri quod ego Johannes Goudhyne de 
A.D. 1337. Marlebergh dedi concessi et hac presenti carta mea confirrnaui 

Boberto Bussel juniori de Northlidierd omnes terras et tene- | :; 
menta redditus et seruicia mea cum suis pertinenciis in Quedhampton i 
iuxta Benknolle que habui ex dono et feoffamento Bicardi de Hyweye 
Habendum et tenendum omnia predicta terras et tenementa redditus i 
et seruicia cum omnibus suis pertinenciis prefato Boberto heredibus et 
assignatis suis imperpetuum de capitalibus dominis feodi illius per 
seruicia inde debita et consueta Et ego vero predictus Johannes et 
heredes mei omnia predicta terras et tenementa redditus et seruicia cum 
suis pertinenciis prefato Boberto heredibus et assignatis suis m 
predictum est contra omnes homines warantizabimus acquietabimus. 
et imperpetuum defendemus In cuius rei testimonium huic carte sigillurn I 
meum apposui. Hiis testibus Johanne Pedewardyn. Johanne Brian. 
Johanne de Chilton. Johanne Bernard. Johanne Touki. Willelmo 
atte Welde. et Nicholao de Ufcote. Data apud Quedhampton pre- 
dictam die Martis proxima post festum Sancti Johannis ante portani I 
Latinam. Anno regni regis Edwardi tercij post conquestum vndecirno.'l 
Seal perished. No. 94. 

The original of the document which comes next in the "j 
stract " is missing. The " abstract " describes it as follows : — 

(13) 
12 March, 31 Edw. 3, 1357 [1356-7] Letter of Attorney fron 






The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 101 

Kobert Russell to Bob' de Mordone to deliver to Rob' de Wyke his 
kinsman possession of 

All his lands and tenemente in Quedhampton in the parish of 
Elinden 
To hold to him & the heirs of his body lawfully begotten according to 
the form of a certain deed made to him. 

Whatever the nature of this transaction it did not terminate 
he possession here of the family of Eussel, as appears by the fol- 
ding counterpart of an indenture of demise : — 

(14) 

11 June Hec indentura testatur quod Eobertus Eussel miles tradidit 
A.D. 1379 concessit et dimisit Elianore Sauage manerium suum de 
Quydhampton cum omnibus terris pratis pascuis pasturis 
et redditibus et cum omnibus aliis suis pertinenciis Habendum et 
tenendum totum predictum manerium cum omnibus terris pratis 
pascuis pasturis et redditibus et cum omnibus aliis suis pertinenciis ad 
terminum vite sue de predicto Roberto heredibus vel assignatis suis 
libere et in pace Reddendo inde annuatim michi predicto Roberto ad 
terminum vite mee viginti libras sterlingorum ad quatuor anni terminos 
principales per equates porciones Et faciendo capitalibus dominis feodi 
illius omnia servicia inde debita et de jure consueta ac eciam omnia et 
singula alia onera redditus et servicia predicto manerio cum omnibus 
suis pertinenciis interim quouismodo tangencia sustentando eciam 
interim reparando et manutenendo totum predictum manerium cum 
omnibus suis pertinenciis competenter in omnibus suis necessariis 
sumptibus predicte Elianore durante vita sua in adeo bono statu sicut ea 
in principio termini recepit Ita quod predictus redditus viginti librarum 
non depereat absque vasto seu destruccione interim quovismodo faciendo 
Et si predicta Elianora in solucione predictarum viginti librarum per 
quindecim dies in parte vel in toto defecerit extunc bene liceat predicto 
Roberto vel assignatis suis in predicto manerio cum pertinenciis suis 
ingredi et in eadem vndique distringere et districciones sic captas fugare 
et retinere quousque de predicto redditu sic aretro existente predicto 
Roberto seu assignatis suis ad terminum vite sue plenarie fuerit 
satisfactum Et si contingat predictus redditus viginti librarum per 
unum mensem post aliquem terminum supradictum aretro existere aut 
si predicta Elianora predictum manerium cum suis pertinenciis 
competenter ut predictum est non sustentaverit reparaverit manu- 
tenuerit aut vastum seu destruccionem inde fecerit aut de eodem 
manerio cum omnibus suis pertinencijs seu de aliqua parcella ejusdem 
rnanerij alienacionem quouismodo fecerit quod tunc bene liceat predicto 
Roberto seu assignatis suis totum manerium predictum cum omnibus 
suis pertinencijs ut predictum est reingredi et in pristino statu suo 
retinere dimissione predicta non obstante Et predictus Robertus vult 
et concedit quod predictum manerium cum omnibus suis pertinencijs 



102 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

post deeessum predicte Elianore remaneat Isabelle filie prediete Elianore 
ad terminum vite sue tenendum et faciendo in omnibus in forma predicta 
Et predictus Robertus vult et coneedit quod predictum manerium cum 
omnibus suis pertinency's post deeessum prediete Isabelle integre re- 
maneat Cristine sorori predicte Isabelle ad terminum vite sue tenendum 
et faciendo in omnibus in forma predicta Et predictus Eobertus vult et 
coneedit quod predictum manerium cum omnibus suis pertinenciis post 
deeessum predicte Cristine integre remaneat Agnete sorori dicte Cristine 
ad terminum vite sue tenendum et faciendo in omnibus in forma predicta 

+ . b. Et ego vero predictus Robertus heredes et assignati mei totum 
predictum manerium cum omnibus suis pertinencijs in forma predicta 
contra omnes gentes warantizabimus acquietabimus et defendemus la 
cuius rei testimonium partes predicte hijs indenturis sigilla sua alternatim 
apposuerunt Hijs testibus Rogero de Bello campo milite Willelmo 
Worston Roberto Crekkelade Roberto Deuenyssh Ricardo Priour Johanne 
Schour Johanne Mascal et alijs Data apud Lydyerd Mulcent in festo 
Sancti Barnabe Apostoli Anno regni Regis Ricardi Secundi post con- 
questum seeundo 

+ . a. Et post deeessum predicte Agnete totum predictum manerium 
cum omnibus suis pertinencijs integre remaneat Thome filio predicti 
Roberti et heredibus suis masculis de corpore suo legitime procreatis 
tenendum de capitalibus dominis feodi illius per seruicia inde debita et 
de iure consueta imperpetuum Et si predictus Thomas sine herede 
masculo de corpore suo legitime procreato obierit quod absit tunc pre- 
dictum manerium cum omnibus suis pertinencijs integre remaneat rectis 
heredibus predicti Roberti Tenendum de capitalibus dominis feodi illius 
per seruicia inde debita et de iure consueta imperpetuum. Seal of arms, 
a lion passant, with legend, S. HVGONIS. DE. MAVNDEVILE. 

No. 95. 

It seems improbable tbat all the " lives " in the foregoing lease 
should have dropped within nine years, but in 1388 we find Sir 
Robert demising his lands in " Quedhamton," the buildings, &c. t 
excepted, to John Groundi, for a year : — 

(15) 

26 March Hec indentura facta apud Lydeard Mylcent in crastino An- 
A.D. 1388 nunciacionis beate Marie virginis Anno regni Regis Ricardi 
secundi post conquestum vndecimo inter Robertum Russel 
chivaler ex una parte et Johannem Groundi ex altera parte testatur quod i 
predictus Robertus concessit et ad firmam dimisit predicto Johanni; 
totam terram suam in Quedhamton cum pratis pascuis pasturis et red- 
ditibus exceptis domibus manerij columbario et clauso de nouo fossatoj 
circa predictum manerium iacente, aceciam quadam pecia terre iacente, 
in parte occidentali manerij predicti infra quandam viam que duciti 
uersus Benknoll et le Doune et eciam omnibus perquisitis curiarum 
finis (sic) releuiis et heriettis predicto manerio spectantibus Habendum 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 103 

et 'tenendum a die confeccionis presenciurn vsque ad eundem festurn 
tunc proxirnurn sequens per unum annum integrum reddendo inde 
predicto Boberto heredibus et assignatis suis ad festum Sancti Johannis 
Baptiste tunc proximurn sequens viginti sex solidos et octo denarios ad 
festum Sancti Miehaelis Archangeli tunc proximurn sequens viginti 
sex solidos et octo denarios et duo quartaria frumenti puri et boni 
bladi ad festum Omnium Sanctorum tunc proximurn sequens quatuor 
quarteria frumenti puri et boni bladi ad festum Natalis Domini 
tunc proximurn sequens viginti sex solidos et octo denarios ad 
festum Annunciacionis beate Marie virginis tunc proximurn sequens 
viginti sex solidos et octo denarios ad festum Natiuitatis Sancti 
Johannis Baptiste tunc proximurn sequens viginti sex solidos et octo 
denarios et ad festum Sancti Miehaelis Archangeli tunc proximurn 
sequens viginti sex solidos et octo denarios et faciendo pro predicto 
Boberto omnia onera predicto manerio quouismodo tangencia durante 
termino predicto vsque ad festum Sancti Miehaelis tunc proximurn 
sequens Et predictus Bobertus vult et concedit pro se et heredibus suis 
quod predictus Johannes poterit seminare in anno proximo futuro ad 
semen yemale et quadragesimale semen suum in terra predicta in 
campo ut iacet et proficuum vesture bladorum predictorum ad volun- 
tatem suam capere et cariare infra dominium predictum sine contra- 
diccione alicuius durante termino predicto et a termino predicto vsque 
festum Sancti Miehaelis tunc proximurn sequens Et si contingat quod 
predicta firma a retro sit in parte vel in toto ad aliquem terminum per 
octo dies bene liceat predicto Boberto heredibus et assignatis suis in 
predictis terris pratis pascuis pasturis et redditibus ingredi et distringere 
et districciones retinere donee de predicta firma plenarie fuerit sibi 
satisfactum Et si contingat quod predicta firma aretro sit in parte vel 
in toto ad aliquem terminum predictum per unum mensem bene liceat 
predicto Roberto heredibus et assignatis suis in predictis terris pratis 
pascuis pasturis et redditibus reingredi et in pristino statu retinere cum 
omnibus bonis et catallis in eisdem inuentis sine contradiccione alicuius 
In cuius rei testimonium partes predicte hiis indenturis sigilla sua 
alternatim apposuerunt Hiis testibus Boberto Duenyssh Johanne Schour 
Johanne Mascal Willelmo Bryght Johanne Stolas et aliis Data die et 
anno supradictis. Fragment of seal. No. 96. 

The "title" at this point, upon examination in the seventeenth 
century, was apparently considered defective, and recourse had to 
the national records. The result is described in the " abstract " 
as follows: — 

2 May, 12 Edw d . 4, 1472. Copy of an Inquisicion whereby it appears 
that John Bussell was seized in his demesne as of fee (amongst other 
lands) of One messuage and 100 acres of land cum jpertinenciis in 
Quidhampton And that the said messuage and land in Quidhampton 
were worth 100 s . per annum and were held of the Priory of Bradstock. 



104 The Society's MSS. Qiiidhampton. 

The copy itself is merely an extract : — 

(16) 

Ex Bundello Escaet' de Anna 

duodecimo regni Regis Edwardi 

quarti (inter alia) 

Inquisitio capta apud Novam Sarum in comitatu Wiltes' secundo die 

Maii Anno regni Eegis Edwardi Quarti post conquestum duodecimo 

coram Radulpho Banestre Escaetore Domini Regis in comitatu predicto 

virtute brevis dicti Domini Regis eidem Escaetori directi et huic Inqui- 

sitioni consuti per sacramentum Henrici Swayn Armigeri RicardiFreman 

Armigeri, &c. 

Qui dicunt super sacramentum quod Johannes Russell Armiger in 
dicto brevi nominatus fuit seisitus in dominico suo ut defeodo de quinque 
messuagiis quingintis acris terre centum acris prati trescent' acris pasture 
et centum acris bosci cum pertinenciis in Luydeyard Mylcent Et de 
uno messuagio et centum acris terre cum pertinenciis in Shawe Et 
uno messuagio et sexaginta acris terre cum pertinenciis in Pyryton Et- 
de duobus messuagiis et centum acris terre cum pertinenciis in 
Wotton Basset et vocat' Russell et Bukk. Et de uno messuagio et D. 
acris terre cum pertinenciis in Quedhamton. Et de uno messuagio &c. 
Et dicta messuagium et terra in Quedhampton valent per Annum in 
omnibus exitibus ultra reprisas centum solidos et tenentur de Priore de 
Bradstoke set per que servicia juratores predicti penitus ignorant. Et &c. 

Examinaf 7 Feb. 1600 [1600-1601] 
Concordat hactenus cum Originali 
suo Recordo. W. Lambard. 
No. 97. 

There is no doubt that the inquisition states in spite of the 
" abstract," that the Paissell holding in Qiiidhampton consisted of 
five hundred acres — a difficult statement to accept! 

The original inquisition further alleges that the heir of the 
Kussells was a Collingbourne — though all this and much more is 
omitted in the extract furnished by Mr. Lambard — and it is in 
the possession of a Collingbourne that we find the property ac- 
cording to the document next in order in the " abstract," the 
original of which is also forthcoming :■. — 

(17) 

8 July This endentur made by twene Wyllyam Colyngborne Esquyer 

A.D. 1474 of the on parte And Wyllyam Ferre of the other parte Wittenes- 

eth that the seid Wylliam Colyngborne hath sett grauntedand 

to ferme dimised vnto the forseid "William Ferre and to Joone his 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 105 

wyf hys maner of Quedhampton with all theerable landes rnedez 
lesowes and pastures vnto the same maner belongynge wardez mariagez 
releves and other eschetes only except and vnto the seid William 
Colyngborne and hys heirez resserued To haue and to hold all the seid 
maner with thapurtenauncez except afore except vnto the seid Wyllyam 
Ferre and Joone his wyf fro the fest of seynt Michell the archangell last 
past afore the date of thes presentz vnto the ende and terme of their 
lyves or which of them lengyst lyveth yeldyng ther fore yerly vnto the 
forseid Willy am Collyngbourne his heirez or his assignez vj.li. xiij.s. iiij.d. 
to be payd at the festes of Ester and Michelmasse by evyn porcions 
And if the seid rent of vj.li. xiij.s. iiij.d. or any parte ther of be vnpayd 
aftur eny of the seid festes paiable by. xv. dayes than hit shal be lawfull 
vnto the seid Wyllyam Colyngborne hys heirez or his assignez to entre 
in all the seid maner with thapurtenauncez and distreyne and that 
distresse so take to reteyne and eneioy vnto the tyme the seid rent with 
the arrerages be fully satisfied and content And if the seid rent be 
vnpaid aftur eny of the seid festes paiable by . iij monethes and no 
sufficient distresse may be founde vppon the seid maner with thappur- 
tenauncez or if the seid Wyllyam Ferre or Joone or ey ther of them graunfc 
the estate to any other person or persones with oute licence of the seid 
William Colyngborne then hit shalbe lawfull unto the seid William 
Colyngborne his heirez or his assignez in all the seid maner with 
the appurtenaunce to reentre the same to eneioy and the seid Wyllyam 
Ferre and Joone and eyther of them to put oute this graunte not 
withstandyng And if the seid William Ferre and Joone or eyther 
of them do eny waste vppon the seid maner or vppon eny parcell of 
hyt durynge the seid termes than hit shal be lawfull vnto the forseid 
Wyllyam Collyngborne his heirez or his assignes to commaunde his 
Steward or any other of his seruantes in that behalf at all season to se the 
wastes be don and to call vnto hym iij or iiij of indiferent persones in- 
habited next adioynyng vnto the same maner and by ther discretions yf 
any waiste be founde to cesse hit accordyng And than the seid Willyam 
Ferre and Joone and eche of them shall pay or do to be paide vnto 
Wyllyam Collyngborne his heirez or his assignez with in iij monethes 
next after the the seid . waiste so demed double the valure and that hit 
shall be as lawful vnto the seid Willyam Colyngborne or his assignes to 
entre and distreyne vppon the seid maner with thappurtenaunces in 
maner and forme a forespecified alsowell for the seid waiste and for the 
yerely rent And the seid Willyam Ferre and Joone and eyther of them 
during the seid terme shall at ther propre costes and expens repaire and 
maynteyne all the housez and hegges vppon the seid maner onely except 
that the seid Wyllyam Colyngborne his heirez or his assignez shall at 
ther propre costes and expens repaire the grose tymbre of the seid howsez 
duryng the seid termes provided allwey that yf eny of the seid grose 
tymbre be hurt by the seid Willyam Ferre and Joone or eyther of them 
or by ther meanes than the seid Willyam Ferre and Joone and euerych 
of them shall at ther propre cost and expens reemend the same grose 
tymbre and repayre hit All so the seid Wyllyam Ferre and Joone shall 



106 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

haue and euerych of them shall haue sufficient housbote heybote plowbote 
and cartebote difryng the terme abofeseid with oute eny waste ther of to 
be don lyke as o]?er fermers haue had a fore tyme and vppon the seid 
maner to be expendid And allso the seid William Ferre durynghys seid 
terme shall haue of the seid AVyllyam Colyngborne and his heirez a 
gowne cloth of ther lyuerey or elles vj.s. viij.d. for hit at the eleccion of 
the seid Wyllyam Colyngborne and his heirez In to the whiche wittnesse 
of thes endentures eyther parte to other they haue putto ther seales y 
zeuen the viij th day of Jule the yere of the regne of Kyng Edward the 
iiij th aftur his (sic) conqueste the xiiij th . Tioo seals. No. 98. 

William Collingbourne was attainted ; his lands, however, came 

eventually to the hands of his two daughters and co-heirs and 

were divided between them. The next document — the original is 

lost — shows Quidhampton in the possession of the elder of these 

ladies and her husband : — 

(18) 

12 Oct. 4 Hen. 7, 1489 [1488] By Indenture Between George 
Chadertone gent' & Margaret his wife of the one part and Richard Fare 
yeoman of the other part the s d . George & Margarett did sett grant & to 
farme demise unto the s d Richard 

their mannor of Quidhampton with all 
the arable land and appurtenances thereto 
belonging 
To hold to the s d Richard and his assignes from Michaelmas then 
last for 21 years at 8 U . per annum payable at Lady day & Michelmas 

Chaderton and his wife continued in possession for about thirteen- 
and-a-half years, when, as appears by the following indenture of 
bargain and sale, they sold the manor to Reed : — 

(19) 

19 April This Endenture made the xix" 1 day of Aprell the xvijth 
1502 yere of the Reigne of Kyng Henry the vij th Bitwene Barth'u 

Reed Aldreman Citezein and Goldsmyth of London on that 
one part And George Chaterton of Bredfeld in the Countie of Wilteshire 
Gentilman and Margaret his wyf one of the doughters & heires of William 
Colyngbourne Esquyer deceassed on that other part Witnessith that 
the said George and Margaret for the summe of cxxxiij.li. vjs. viij.d. 
sterling to be payed as herevnder is specyfied haue bargayned & sold 
vnto the said Barth'u the manior of Quedhampton w l thappurtenaunces 
in Quedhampton in the parisshe of Elyndon in the said Countie of 
Wilteshire And all the londes Tenementes medes lesees pastures rentes 
reuersions & seruices of the said George or of the said Margaret his 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 107 

wif or of any other to thuse of the same George and Margaret or of 
either of theym in Quedharnpton and Elyndon aforsaid And all maner 
of Courtes waystes streyes reliefes eschetes wardes customes fynes for- 
feytis aruerciamentes and all other commodities liberties ffraunchises 
priuileges and profites to the said manoir londes & tenementes or to 
any part or parcell of theym perteynyng or belonging or to or w' the 
same had vsed or occupyed w' all other thappurtenaunces And the said 
George & Margaret couenaunte permytte & graunte by thise presentes 
that they been now seased as in the Right of the said Margaret of the 
said manoir londes & Tenementes and that they theyr heires feoffes & 
grauntees and all other hauyng any thyng in the premysses to thuse of 
of the said George and Margaret or of either of theym or of their heires 
whansoeuer they before the feast of Mighelmasse next commyng after 
the date abouesaid or afterward therto be requyred shall do cause & 
suffre to be doon atte costes and charges of the said Barth'u or of his 
heires all that which the lerned Counsell of the same Barth'u or of his 
heires shall devise and ordre to be doon for to make sure all the said 
manoir londes Tenementes and other the premysses to the said Barth'u 
and to his heires or to other at his denominacion by dedes releasees 
w' clauses of generall warrantie ffynes recoueres or otherwise as the said 
lerned Counsell shall ordre And that the said George and Margaret 
before the said feast shall clere & discharge all the premysses of all 
former bargaynes grauntes & sales of the same or of any parcell therof 
And of all Dowers Joyntours recognisaunces statutes of the Staple 
Statutes merchauntes rentes Annuytees leases & all other charges what- 
soueer they be Except of the old rentes & charges of theym to the Chyef 
lordes of the ffee from hensforth due to be payed And that before the 
said feast the same George and Margaret or either of theym shall delyuer 
to the said Barth'u or to his heires all the dedes Evydences escriptes & 
minnymentes which the said George & Margaret or eyther of theym or 
any other to thuse of theym or of either of theym hath or haue concernyng 
the premysses And moreouer the said George covenaunteth pro- 
mytteth and warranteth by thise presentes that the forsaid manoir londes 
and tenementes & other the premysses be clerely worth to be letten by 
yere from yere to yere w'out fraude aboue all charges reprises & 
necessary reparacion .viij.li. sterling And ^furthermore the said 
George couenaunteth & graunteth by these presentes that yf it happen 
hereafter the said Bartilmew & his Cofeoffes of the said manoir londes 
and tenementes aforsaid their heires or Assignees by eny persone or 
persones to be vexed sued or impleted for any Right or title by such 
persone or persones to be claymed in or to the said manoir londes & 
Tenementes w' their Appurtenaunces or in or to any parcell of theym 
that than the said George his heires & executours beyng notyfied of such 
vexacion sute or Impledyng shall at their owne costes & charges defend 
all such vexacion sute or plee and so from tyme to tyme as oft as such 
case shall hap And yf any thing by such vexacion sute or emplee ayenst 
the said Barth'u & his Cofeoffes their heires or Assignees be recouered that 
than the same George his heires & Assignees shall w'out delay satysfy 



108 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

& recompense to the said Barth'u his heires & executours of and for all 
]>e recouere so hadde of asmoch other lond clere in lawe & to such value 
yerely as the said manoir londes & Tenementes so recouered woll or 
shall amounte vnto ffor the which, manoir londes & tenementes & 
all the premysses and for all & singuler the forsaid Bargayne grauntes 
couenauntes & promyses to he had holden kept & obserued in maner & 
fourme afore expressed the said Bartilmew hath payed in hand atte 
sealyng of these endentures vnto the forsaid George & Margaret cxx" lu 
of laufull money of Englond parcell of the said cxxxiij li. vj.s. viij.d. And 
the xiij.li. vj.s. viij.d. Residue of the forsaid summe of cxxxiij.li. vj.s. viijd. 
the said George & Margaret wolle couenaunte & graunte by thise presentes 
that the said Barth'u shall haue & reteyne to his owne vse towardes his 
costes and charges by hym to be had & susteyned for the makyng sure of 
the premysses so that of the said hole summe of cxxxiij.li. vj.s. viij.d. 
the said George & Margaret holde theym fully satisfyed & content & 
therof discharge the said Bartilmew & his executours by these presentes 
And where the said George by his obligacion of Statute of the Staple 
berying date the day & yere abouesaid stondeth bounde to pe forsaid 
Barth'u in cc.li. sterlinges paiable in the feast of Seynt Mighell next 
commyng as in the said obligacion of Statute more playnly appereth 
Neuerthelesse the said Bartilmew wolleth & graunteth by these 
presentes that yf the forsaid George wele & truely hold kepe & perfourme 
all and singuler the Couenauntes grauntes & promyses on his partie 
abouereherced in maner & fourme aforsaid that than the said obligacion 
of statute shalbe voide & of noon effect And elles wolleth & graunteth 
the said George by these presentes that the same Statute shall stonde in 
full strengthe & effect this endenture notwithstondyng In witnesse 
whereof the parties abouesaid to this Endentures sunderly haue set their 
seales Writen the day and yere abouesaid. 

George Chad'ton. 

Two seals, utterly destroyed. No. 99. 



On the following day George Chaterton released his right in the 

manor to Sir Eeginald Bray and others, to whom he and his wife 

had already suffered a recovery thereof, described in the " abstract " 

as follows : — 

(20) 

Easter Term, 17 H. 7, 1502. An Exemplification of a Eecovery 
whereby S r Reginald Bray, lent. S r . John Shaa knt. Hugh Oldom clerk, 
Henry Woodcock and John Rede Recover against George Chatterton & 
Margarett his wife. 

The Mannor of Quidhampton cum pertinenciis & 200 
acres of land 40 acres of meadow 200 acres of pasture & 
10 acres of wood cum pertinenciis in Quidhampton & 
Ellndon in com' Wilts. 






The Society's MSS. Quidhanvpton. 109 

The abovementioned release, of which the original is preserved, 
is as follows : — 

29 April Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit 
1502 Georgius Chaterton de Bredfeld in Comitatu Wiltes' Gentilnian 
salutem in domino sempiternam. Noueritis me prefatum 
Georgium remisisse relaxasse et omnino de et pro me et heredibus meis 
imperpetuum quietum clamasse Regiualdo Bray militi Johanni Shaa 
militi Hugoni Oldom clerico Henrico Wodecok et Johanni Rede in 
eorum plena et pacifica possessione existente heredibus et assignatis suis 
imperpetuum totum ius meum statum titulum clameum interesse et 
demandam que unquam habui habeo seu quouismodo habere potero 
infuturum De et in manerio de Quedhampton cum pertinenciis Ducentis 
acris terre quadraginta acris prati Ducentis acris pasture et decern acris 
bosci cum pertinenciis in Quedhampton et Elyndon in Comitatu Wiltes' 
Que quidem manerium terras et cetera premissa predicti Beginaldus 
Johannes Shaa Hugo Oldom Henricus et Johannes Ilede per breue 
Domini Regis de Ingressu super disseisinam in le post in Curia dicti 
Domini Regis coram Thoma Wode et Soeiis suis Justiciariis eiusdem 
Domini Regis de Banco Termino Pasche Anno regni dicti Domini Regis 
nunc Henrici septimi decimo septimo versus me prefatum Georgium et 
Margaretam vxorem meam nuper recuperauerunt / Ita videlicet quod 
nee ego predictus Georgius nee heredes mei nee aliquis alius per nos pro 
nobis seu nomine nostro aliquod ius statum titulum clameum interesse 
seu demandam de vel in predictis manerio et terris ac ceteris premissis 
cum suis pertinenciis seu de vel in aliqua eorundem parcella decetero 
exigere clamare vendicare seu demandare poterimus aut debemus quouis- 
modo infuturum Sed ab omni accione iuris status tituli clamei interesse 
et demande inde petenda sumus exclusi imperpetuum per presentes Et 
ego vero predictus Georgius et heredes mei predictum manerium et 
terras ac cetera premissa cum suis pertinenciis prefatis Reginaldo 
Johanni Shaa Hugoni Oldom Henrico Wodecok et Johanni Rede 
heredibus et assignatis suis contra omnes gentes warantizabimus 
imperpetuum per presentes. In cuius rei testimonium huic presenti 
scripto meo sigillum meum apposui Datum vicesimo die mensis 
Aprilis Anno regni predicti Regis Henrici Septimi Decimo septimo 
supradicto 

Geokge Chaderton. 

Seal, three picks, the hafts placed crosswise. 

Endorsed. — Irrotulatur in dorso claus'Cancellarie Domini Regis infrascripti 
mense et anno infrascriptis. No. 100. 

What immediately follows is transcribed from the " abstract," 
the originals not being forthcoming : — 

(22) 
1 April, 1506. By Deed Poll Hugh then Bishop of Exeter and 
John Reede Did remise release and for ever quittclaime unto Henry 



110 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

Woodcock, in performance of the last will of S r Bartholomew Eeede kn l . 

then late Mayor & Alderman of London deceased All their right title 

interest and demand of in and to 

The Mannor of Quidhampton cum pertinenciis and 
in 200 acres of land 40 acres of meadow 200 acres of 
pasture and 10 acres of wood cum pertinenciis- in Quid- 
hampton and Elindon in Com' Wilts' which the said 
Hugh by the name of Hugh Oldom Clerk and John Eede 
together with the said Henry Woodcock & S r Eeginald 
Bray & Sr John Shaa then deceased Recovered against 
George Chatterton and Margarett his wife in Easter term 
then before. 

(23) 

Last of Sepf. 22 Henry 7, 1507 [1506]. Copy of an Inquisicion taken 
before the Escheator by virtue of a writt of Diem Clausit Extremum 
upon the death of Bartholomew Rede Whereby it appeared that before 
the death of the s d . Bartholomew one W m . Mountford W m . Curteys gent' 
Chistopher Eliott & Thomas Pygott citizens and gold smiths of London 
were seized of the manor of Newton Tony cum pertinenciis and of the 
advowson of the church of Newton Tony in com" Wilts' in their demesne 
as of fee of the gift and graunt and confirmacion of Edward Graye 

Viscount Lisle S r . James Tyrell Kn'. Richard Crofts Esq r . and 

Hungerford Esq r . who with other deceased first had the s d . mannor & 
advowson of the gift grant & confirmacion of S r . Tho. West kn 1 Lord 
Laware son and heir of Richard West Lord Laware And they being so 
seized in the term of Easter 4° Henrici Septimi the s d . Bartholomew & 
one Henry Woodcock & John Shaa recovered the s d . mannor & advowson 
against the s d . W m . Mountford W m Curteys Christopher Eliott and Tho: 
Pygott By virtue of which recovery the s d Bartholomew Henry and 
Thomas ('tis " Thomas " in ye Inquisicion) became seized in fee And 
being so seized the s d Bartholomew & John Shaa dyed before the takeing 
of this Inquisition and the s d Henry survived them and was then soly 
seized in fee to the use aforesaid. 

And by the s d . Inquisicion it further appeared that long before the 
death of s d Bartholomew Rede one Hugh Oldom Bishop of Exeter Henry 
Woodcock & John Rede were seized in their demesne as of fee to the 
use of the said Bartholomew & his heirs and to his last will of 

The mannor of Quidhampton and of two [hundred] 
acres of land forty acres of meadow 200 acres of pasture 
and ten acres of wood cum pertinenciis in Quidhampton 
& Elindon in com' predicto 

And that the said Bartholomew Rede made his will whereby he ap- 
pointed that his wife Eliz: should have the premisses for her life and 
after her death that the same should remaine in the Guardianshipp of 
the Goldsmiths Company of London for 10 years after the decease of 
[the said] Elizabeth And that the Guardians should receive the profits 
of the premisses and thereout pay severall debts & summes of money 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. Ill 

appointed by s d . will And that after y' end of y e s <l . ten years W"' Kede 
son of John Eede brother of the s d Bartholomew and the heirs males of 
the body of the s d William lawfully begotten by the permission of his 
feoffees should receive the profits of the s d mannor & premisses And in 
default of heirs males of the body of the s d W m Eede divers other persons 
in the s d will named one after the other & the heirs males of the body 
of every of them lawfully begotten by permission of y e feoffees should 
receive the rents and profits of y e premisses for their own use And 
further willed that in default of heirs males the s d manner & premisses 
cum pertinenciis should remaine to the right heires of the s d Bartholomew 
Eede for ever 

And further willed that if the s d William Eede then liveing or being 
dead the next heir male of his body or any other heir male that the s d 
Bartholomew should appoint to have & receive to his own use the rents 
& profits of his mannor lands & tenements in the Countys of Middlesex 
and Surrey immediately after the decease of the s d Elizabeth without any 

within the s d ten years next after the decease of the s d Elizabeth 

who would take upon him the government of the s d mannors messuages 
lands & tenements last appointed to be in the government of the s d 
Goldsmiths Company and in the rest of the rents and profits to the end 
of the s d . ten years & would give good security to the value of the lands 
for the s d ten years to levy & receive the rents and profits dureing the s d 
terme, and render just account thereof to the Goldsmiths Company & 
their successors and make true payment to them and their successors 
according to the s d will, that then as well the feoffees as the s d Company 
& their successors should suffer the s d W m Eede or him that should give 
such security quietly to have the management of the premisses with the 
rents & profits thereof in the same manner as the Company could do & 
performe the same if such security was not given. And so in like 
manner for every heir male for the time being giveing such security as 
aforesaid And referrs to the will : and setts forth the date of the will 
(but not legible being tome) And that soon after viz' 21 Hen: 7 the s d . 
Bartholomew Eede dyed after whose death the s d Henry Woodcock be- 
came seized of the s d mannor of Newton Tony & of the s d church to 
the use of the last will of the s d . Bartholomew And that the s d Hugh 
Oldham & Henry Woodcock became seized of the mannor of 
Quidhampton cum pertinenciis and were then seized thereof to the use 
of the last will of the s d Bartholomew. And the jury upon the 
s d Inquisition further say that Eoger Eede elder brother of the s d . W m . 
Eede & cousin and next heir of the s d . Bartholomew viz 1 , son of John 
brother of the s d . Bartholomew, is of the age of 28 years & upwards And 
that the s d Bartholomew held no other mannors lands or tenements in 
the s d county of Wilts of the s d King or of any other person in demesne 
or in service the day that he dyed And also say that the s d . mannor of 
Newton Tony cum pertinenciis and the advowson of the said church 
is held of S r John Scrope as of his mannor of Castlecombe And is of 
the value of 20" per annum beyond all reprizes And that the s d mannor 
& other the premisses in Quidhampton & Elinden are held of the Abess 



112 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

of Wilton in soccage and are of the value of 100 shillings per annum In 
testimony whereof aswell the said Eseheator as the Jury aforesaid have 
sett their hands & seals. Dated the day year & place aforesaid. 

Concordat' cum recordo et examinat' 
per me Eicardum Cartwright. 

(24) 

3 d Feb'y 34 Ul Hen. 8, 1543 [1542-3] A Deed indented whereby 
John Rede for 40" paid him by John Spencer in the name of a fine or 
income Did give grant and to farm lett to the said John Spencer and 
Robert and Richard sons of the s d John Spencer 

Themannor of Quidhampton cum pertinenciis in com' 

"Wilts' Except all great trees woods underwoodes wards 

marriages, releifs escheats and amercements profits and 

perquisits of courts 

To hold to the said John Spencer Robert and Richard his sons from 

Michaelmas then last for the lives of the said John Robert and Richard 

and the survivors at the rent of 8" payable halfe yearly with powers of 

attorney to enter & give seizin and possession And livery of seizin 

endorsed. 

(25) 

9 Feb r y 7 Eliz a . 1565 [1564-5] By Indenture Between John Reede 
of the one part and John Spencer Richard Spencer & Christofer Spencer 
sons of [the] s d John Spencer of the other part The s d John Rede in con- 
sideration of 100 1 ' paid him by John Spencer the father Did demise grant 
& to farme lett unto the said John Spencer Richard Spencer & Christofer 
Spencer 

All that the capitall messuage or tenement and farm 

of Quedhampton cum pertinenciis in com' Wilts' and all 

houses outhouses &c. and all other the lands in Wroughton 

alias Elindon in com' pre&icto then late in the possession 

of the said John Spencer Except all great timber trees 

woods, underwoods &c. profits and perquisits of courts 

To hold unto the s d John Richard and Christofer Spencer and to their 

assignes from thence for the lives of the said John the father Richard & 

Cristofer the sons & the survivor Att 8 U rent payable halfe yearly with 

usuall covenants And a letter of attorney to give seizin and livery 

endorsed 

(26) 

25 Nov r . 24 Eliz a . 1582 [1581]" By a copy of an Indenture 

between John Reed Esq r . of the one part and Tho: Crane of the other 
part The said John Reede in consideration of 1000 1 ' paid to him by 
Tho: Crane and other considerations Did grant bargayne & sell to the 
said Tho: Crane his heirs and assignes for ever 

The mannor then of the said John Reede or of some 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 113 

of his ancestors in Newton Tony in Com' Wilts' with the 

advowson of the Church of Newton Tony 

And all that the mannor or lordship of Quidhampton 

cum pertinenciis in Wroughton alias Elindon in com' 

Wilts' 
To hold to the s d . Tho: Crane his heirs & assignes for ever w th a 
covenant with a covenant against incumbrances Except a lease there- 
tofore made to John Thistlethwayte for a certaine terme of years of the 
mannor &c. of Newton Tony cum pertinenciis wherof there was then 
about three years to come on which there was the rent of 14" reserved 
which was agreed should be paid to the said Thomas Crane and his 
assignes. And except such estates & interests as Eich d Spencer and 
Christopher Spencer then had in the mannor of Quidhampton & the de- 
mesnes thereof & other the premisses for the lives only of the s d Richard 
& Christopher and for the life of the survivor succesively at the rent of 
8" per annum which was agreed should be paid to the s d Tho: Crane his 
heirs & assignes Subject to a Proviso that if the said Tho: Crane his 
heirs &c. should not pay to the said John Reede his heirs executors or 
assignes the summe of 1300 u on the first March then next at the Mansion 
house of the s d Thomas in St. Bartholemews near West Smithfield 
London And thereupon if the s a John Reede his heirs executors or 
assignes should on first May then next pay to Thomas Crane his heirs 
&c.the summe of 1000 1 ' by him received of Thomas or should there tender 
to the said Tho: Crane his heirs or assignes And the said Thomas Crane 
his heirs or assignes should then refuse to receive the same And also 
if the said John Reede should then also at the time of the tender made 
of the said 1000 1 '. pay the s d . Thomas his heirs &c. one other 1C00 11, 
more to make use of untill the 12"' October then next Or if [the said] 
John Reede his heirs &c. should at the time of such payment or tender 
made of the first mencioned 1000". be ready to pay to [the said] Thomas 
Crane his heirs &c. the s d . other 1000 u . till 12 lh October and [the] s d Tho: 
his heires &c refuse to accept the same in loan uppon the offer thereof 
Then the s d . Thomas should not only at the time of repayment or tender 
made of the first 1000 u . and offer to lend the other 1000 1 '. become bound 
to [the] s d . John his heirs &c. in a recognizance of 2000" for repayment 
of the last mencioned 1000' 1 . on 12"' October then next But also that 
after the repayment of the last mencioned 1000 1 '. and lending of the other 
1000 u to the s d Thomas or lawfull tender and refusall made by the s d . 
Thomas That then the bargain & sale hereby made and all other convey- 
ances estates & assureances to be made of the premisses by the said John or 
his heirs to the s d . Thomas or his heirs should remaine to the only use of 
the s d . John Reede his heirs and assignes for ever And that then the said 
John Reede his heirs and assignes should receive to his own use all the 
rents in the meane time between the date & the first of May then next 
without interruption of the s d . Thomas Crane his heirs Executors or 
assignes With a covenant from John Rede that if Thomas should pay 
to John Reede his heirs or assignes the summe of 1300 1 '. on the first March 
then next Or if the s d . John Reede should not repay or tender to Thomas 

'0L. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. I 



114 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

Crane the 1000 1 ' by him recived as aforesaid or shall not tender or offer 
to the s d . Thomas the s d . other 1000 u to use till the 12 October That 
this indenture & all other conveyances should remaine absolute to the 
s a . Thomas Crane & his heirs & to no other use And that then [the] s d . 
John Eeede his heirs &c. should redeliver to the s a . Thomas Crane his I 
heirs &c. all such writings as John Eeede or any other to his use had or 
could come by And that then also the s d . Thomas Crane might hold & 
enjoy the premisses & the rents & profits in the meane time With a 
Covenant from John Eeede and his wife for further assurance against 
all persons other then the persons before excepted and such as claime 
any copyhold estates And a covenant that Thomas Crane should pay 
to the wife of John Eeede 100 marks within seaven days after [the] s a . 
John & Elizabeth should levy a fine of the premisses 

(27) 

Last July 34°. Eliz. 1592. By Indenture betweene Tho: Crane of 
the one part and Edward Penruddock & John Penruddock, Esq/ W ra .l 
Lockey and Thomas Catches (sic) of the other part the said Tho: Crane J 
in consideracion of his naturall love & affeccion to Elizabeth his eldest 
daughter and for the preferment of her & the heirs of her body after the I 
death of the said Tho: Crane & other consideracions Did give grant alien 
enfeoffe & confirme to the said Edward & John Penruddock Lockey &. 
Catcher and to their heirs for ever. 

All that his mannor lordshipp or farm of Quidhampton 
cum pertinenciis in "Wroughton alias Elinden in com' 
Wilts' in the tenure of Eichard Spencer 

To hold to the said Edward & Jn° Penruddock W m Lockey & Tho: 
Catcher & their heirs for ever To the uses following (viz 1 .) To the use of 
the s d Tho: Crane for life sans wast Eemainder to the use of the said 
Elizabeth Crane daughter of the said Tho: Crane & the heirs of her body 
and for default of such issue To the use of Sarah Crane second daughter 
of the said Thomas Crane and the heirs of her body And for default of 
such issue to Frances Crane third daughter in like manner Eemainder 
to Eliuza fourth daughter of the said Tho:Crane in like manner Eemainder 
to the right heirs of the said Tho: Crane for ever Subject to a 
Proviso for makeing void the same upon payment by the said Tho: Crane 
to the Penruddocks Lockey & Catcher or any of them or the heirs 
executors or assignes of any of them the summe of 5 3 . that in such case 
the Trustees should stand seized of the premisses to use of the s d . Tho: 
Crane & of his heirs for ever & for no other use. 

Livery of seizin endorsed. 

(28) 
13th October 1596. The will of Tho: Crane whereby he bequeaths 
to his daughter Sarah Crane his mannor and farm of Quidhampton and 
to the heirs of her body And for default of such issue to his daughter 
Waterhouse and the heirs of her body And in default of such issue to 
his own right heirs for ever. And gave to his daughter Eliuza Crane 
and to the heirs of her body after the decease of Dorothy his wife All 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 115 

those his niessuages lands tenements and hereditaments and demeasnes 
of the manor of Newton Tony aforesaid but his will was that his said 
wife should hold and enjoy all the messuages lands tenements heredita- 
ments and demeasnes of Newton Tony aforesaid with the appurtenances 
dureing her whole naturall life And if his son Bowcher should by force 
of a certain indenture of marriage claime 1000" in leue of the mannor 
of Newton Tony to him thereby assured and the money accordingly paid 
then his wife to have the mannor & seigniory to dispose of at her pleasure 
for the payment thereof And gave severall other small legacys And 
made his wife Dorothy executrix and residuary legatee 
prout the will. 

(29) 
17 th . Jan'?. 39 Eliz: 1597 [1596-7] Copy of an Inquisicion by virtue 
of a commicion in nature of a Diem clausit extremum whereby it 
appears that Thomas Crane was long before his death seized in his de- 
mesne as of fee of the mannor of Newton Tony cum pertinenciis and 
of the advowson of the church of Newton Tony and of the revercion of 
the mannor of Quidhampton and dyed seized And that the revercion 
of the mannor or farm of Quidhampton was held of the Queen by a 
knights fee in capite And is of the value of 5" yearly And that the 
said Thomas Crane dyed the 24th day of October then last And that 
Eliz: Waterhouse the wife of David Waterhouse Esq r . Sarah Crane 
Frances Bowcher the wife of James Bowcher, Esq r , and Eliz: (sic) Crane 
were his daughters and next heirs And that Eliza: Waterhouse at the 
death of the s a Tho: Crane was of the age of 19 years and Sarah Crane 
18 and Frances Bowcher 17 years of age at the death of the said Tho: 
Crane And Eliuzai Crane was 9 years 11 months and 20 days And 
Jhat the said Thomas Crane dyed seized of no other lands in fee held of 
the Queen in Com' "Wilts ' or anywhere else to their knowledge. 

(30) 
19 Nov. This Indenture made the ninteenth day of Nouember in 
A.D. 1599. the yere of the raigne of our soueraine Ladie Elizabeth by 
the grace of god of Ingland ffraunce and Ireland Queene de- 
fendor of the fayth the twoe & fortith Betwene Davyde Waterhouse 
of the Inner Temple London Esqr. and James Bourchier of the Inner 
Temple London Esqr. one the firste parte And William Brockett of 
Wyldhill in the Countie of Herteford gentlman and Sara his wief one 
the second parte And Leonarde Bawtree of Lincolnes Inne in the 
Countie of Middlesex Esqr. one the thirde parte Wittnesseth that 
whereas Thomas Crane late of Newton Tonye in the Countie of Wiltes 
Esqr. haueinge yssue foure daughters (viz.) Elizabeth now the wyefe of 
the said Davide ffraunces nowe the wief of the said James Bourchier, 
Sara nowe the wief of the said William Brockett And Eleuza yett vn- 
maried did in his lief tyme advaunce and bestowe in mariadge the said 
Elizabeth and ffrauncis with porcions assigned vnto them of his landes 
And did therefore after by his laste will and testament in writinge give 

I 2 



116 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

and devise vnto the said Sara all that his Mano r or farme of Quidhampton 
with thappurtenaunces and to the heires of her bodye lawfullie begotten 
And for defalte of such yssue to the said Elizabeth his daughter and the 
heires of her bodie lawfullie begotten And for defalte of such 
yssue to the righte heires of Thomas Crane for ever : And did 
likewise devise vnto the said Eleuza and to the heires of her 
bodye lawefullie begotten after the decease of Dorothye his wief 
All those his messuages landes tenementes hereditamentes & demeanes 
of the Mano r of Newton Tonye aforesaid: And whereas the said 
Mano r of Newton Tonye is nowe by the said Davide bargayned & 
sold vnto one Wylliam Jones of Myldenhall in the Countie of Wiltea 
gentlman (for the benefitt of the said Eleuza) in the conveyance and 
assurance whereof the said William Brockett and Sara his wief are to 
ioyne for the better assurance therof That therefore and for divers 
other good consideracions ytt is covenaunted graunted concluded and 
and agreed by and between the parties to these presentes in manner and 
forme followeinge And the said Davyd Waterhouse & James 
Bourchier have covenaunted graunted concluded & agreed And by these 
presentes for themselves & for etheir of theire heires executors and ad- 
ministrators doe covenaunte & graunte by these presentes to & with 
the said William Brockett & Sara his wyef theire heires exeeutors ad- 
ministrators & assignes in manner & forme followinge : That is to saye 
that the saide Davide Waterhouse & Elizabeth his wyef, James Bourchier 
& ffrauncis his wyfe, together with the saide William Brockett & Sara 
his wyef at all & everie convenient tyme & tymes before the end of the 
terme of S ,e Mychaell which shalbe in the yere of our Lorde & saviour: 
Jesus Christe after his incarnacion one thowsand six hundred upon the] 
reasonable requeste or requestes and att the coasts & charges in the lawe, 
of the said William Brockett and Sara his wief & theire heires andl 
assignes by fyne or fynes in due forme of lawe to be levyed whereupoi: 
proclamacions shall & maye be made accordinge to the forme of th 
statute in that behalf made and provyded And by all other reasonable 4' 
lawefull assurances & conveyaunces in the lawe whatsoever And by such 
name or names as by the said William Brockett & Sara theire heires o! 
assignes or by theire learned councell shalbe within the tyme aforesaic 
devised Shall convey & assure or cause to be conveyed & assured unt 
the said Leonarde Bawtrey & his heires all that the mannor or farme oj 
Quidhampton with thappurtenaunces by the said Thomas Crane by hi 
laste will & testament devised with all his rights members & appurtt 
naunces whatsoever & alsoe all other messuages tofts croftes mills dove!; 
houses gardens orchardes arrable landes meadowes pastures leasurc 
feedinges comons & comon of pasture ponds waters ryvers fyshinge' 
wayfes strayes goodes of ffellones & fugitives, liberties fraunchises jurif 
dictions warrens proffytts couiodities advantages emoluments and hen 
ditamentes whatsoever to the said mannor or farm or anie parte thereii 
belonginge or in anie wise appertaineinge or enjoyed occupyed reputed i 
taken or knowne as parte parcell or member of the same with severa 
warranties of them the said Davyde Waterhouse and his wief & Jam 1 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 117 

Bourchier and his wyef and theire heires And that the said ffynes 
coveyances & assurances whatsoever hereafter to be had as aforesaid 
shalbe to the onelye use & behoofe of the said William Brockett & Sara 
and theire heires & assigns, And to noe other use intent or purpose 
And the saide David Waterhouse for hime selfe his heires executors 
& administrators & every of them doth further covenaunt promise and 
graunte to & with the said William Brockett his executors administrators 
& assignes and to & with everie of them by these presentes That he the 
said David Waterhouse and Elizabeth his wief shall and will at all tyme 
& tymes hereafter & frome tyme to tyme duringe the space of three yeres 
next ensuinge the date hereof upon reasonable request to be made by the 
said William Brockett his heires & assignes doe make acknowledge & 
suffer or cause to be done made acknowledged & suffered all & everie 
suche further acte & acfces devise or devises assurance or assurances in 
the lawe whatsoever for the better more perfitt & further assuringe suer 
makeing & conveyeing of all & singuler the premisses with the appurte- 
naunces & everie parte & parcell thereof to the said William Brockett his 
heires & assignes as by the said William Brockett his heires or assignes or 
by his or theire learned councell in the lawe at theire coasts & charges in 
the lawe shallbe reasonablie advised devised & required, be ytt by fine 
feffment recoverie with voucher or vouchers or deed or deedes enrolled 
release conformacions with warrantie onelie againste the said David & 
Elizabeth & theire heires or otherwise without warrantie att the eleccion 
of the said William Brockett & Sara theire heires & assignes or by all 
anie or as manie of these wayes or meanesas shalbe required as aforesaid 
soe alwayes as the said David Waterhouse & Elizabeth his wiefe for the 
makeing of anie such assurance be nott hereby compelled to travell further 
then the cy ties of London or Westminster or the subburbs of the same or 
above ten miles frome the place where they shalbe att the tyme of such 
request to be made in thai behalf & that he the said William Brockett his 
heires & assignes & every of them shall & maye forever hereafter lawefullie 
& peaceablie & quietlie have hold occupie & enjoye all & singuler the 
. said premisses before mencioned to be conveyed as aforesaid & everie 
parte & parcell thereof without the lawfull lett disturbance or interrupcion 
of the said David Waterhouse & Elizabeth his wief their heires or assignes 
or anie other persone or persons whatsoever lawfullie claimeinge in by 
from or under them or by or throughe his theire or anie of theire 
tytles assents meanes or procurements And likewise the said James 
Bourchier for hime self his heires executors & administrators doth 
covenaunte promise & graunte to & with the said William Brockett & Sara 
his wief theire heires executors administrators & assignes that he the 
said James nor ffrauncis his wief nor anie other for them or in theire 
names or the name of either of th-em shall nott nor will nott sue out or 
persue nor prosecute anie writt of error for the reversinge or avoydinge 
of anie fyne or fiynes as is aforesaid to be levyed or anie other 
conveiance to be had or made by the said James & ffrauncis of the 
said manor or farme of Quidhampton & other the premisses aforesaid 
accordinge to the true intent & meaning of these presents In witness 



118 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

whereof the parties to these presentes have interchangeablie sett their 
handes & seales the day and yeare abovewritten./ 

Da: Watekhouse Ja: Bowchee Leo: Bawtbee 

Sealed and delivered by the hands of the within named Davide 
Waterhouse in the presence of William Lockey & John Millner cum aliis 

Sealed & delivered by the handes of the above named Leonards 
Bawtree in the presence of Robt: Clerk Samuell Latham. 

Endorsed 36. No. 105. 

(31) 
Michaelmas terme 42 Eliz a . 1600. Indentures of a fine Between 
Leonard Bawtree plaintiff & W m . Brockett & Sarah his wife David 
"Waterhouse and Eliz. his wife and James Bowcher deforciants of 

The Manor of Quidhampton cum pertinenciis & of 
one messuage one dovehouse one garden 120 acres of 
land 20 acres of meadow & 120 acres of pasture cum 
pertinenciis in Wroughton alias Elindon. 

(32) 
18 June. This Indenture made the Eighteenth daye of June in the 
A.D. 1601. Three and ffortyth yeare of the raigne of o r Soueraigne Ladye J 
Elizabeth by the grace of god of England ffrawnce and 
Ireland Queene defendo 1 ' of the ffaythe &c. Betwene William Brockett 
of YVildhill in the Countye of Hertford gent', and Sara his wief, of thone 
parte and Leonard Bawtree, of Lincolnes Inn in the Countye of Middle- 
sex esquire, on the other parte Wyttnesseth That aswell for and in 
performance of Certaine Couenauntes conteyned, and specyfied, in one 
paire of Indentures, bearinge date the Seaventh daye of Maye last, I 
made betweene the saide William Brockett and Sara his wief of the l| 
one parte. And John Spencer sonne and heire apparant of Richard I 
Spencer of Quidhampton in the paryshe of Elindon alias Wroughton in j 
the Countye of Wiltes yeoman, one the other parte, as for diuers other | 
Cawses and Consideracions the saide William and Sara specyallie t 
movinge, yt is concluded Condiscended and fullie agreed, by and,i 
betweene the partyes to these presentes in manner and forme, 
followinge And the saide William Brockett, and Sara his wief, by, 
these presentes for them selues and for ether of their heires, Executo", ! 
and administrator, doe Couenaunte and grawnt, to and with the saide 
Leonard Bawtree, his heires, Executo", and Administrato rs , That he the 
saide William Brockett, and Sara his wief, shall and will before the end' 
of the Terme of S' Michaiell next comminge, leavye, and acknowledge' 
one ffine whereuppon proclamacions shall and may be made, aecordinge,. 
to the forme of the statute, in that behalf made, and provyded, of and in 
the Manno' or ffarme of Quidhampton in Elindon, and (sic) Wraughton, 
in the Countye of Wilts in the Tenure or occupacion, of the saide, 
Richard Spencer, w"' Thapp r tenaunces, and of all howses Edifyces, and, 
buildinges rentes reuercions and services, meadowes, feedinges, Closes! 
pastures arrable land Commons, and Commons of pasture, with all 1 



The Society's MSS. Quiclhampton. 119 

proffittes Cornodyties, and emollumentes.with Thapp r tenaunces therevnto 
belonginge, or therewithall vsed or occupyed, in Elindon and Wraughton 
aforesaide, by such name or names, and in such manner, and number of 
acres, as by the saide William Brockett, and Sara theire heires, or 
assignes, or by theire learned Councell shalbe within the tyme aforesaide 
devysed, unto the saide Leonarde Bawtree, and his heires, And yt is 
further Couenaunted, graunted, Concluded, and agreed, by and betweene 
the partyes to these presentes And the saide Leonarde Bawtree for 
him his heires Executo ra , administrator' 5 , and assignes doth Couenaunte 
promyse and graunt by these presentes, to and with the saide William 
Brockett and Sara his wief theire heires Executo 18 , Administrator, and 
Assignes, That the saide ffyne soe leavyed and acknowledged shalbe 
adiudged demed estemed and taken to be and the saide Leonard 
Bawtree and his heires shall stand and be seased of the saide Manno r 
and other the premysses w th Thapp'tenaunces to the sole and onely vses, 
intentes, and purposes hereafter in these presentes expressed That ys to 
saye to the vse of the saide William and Sara, and the heires of the 
saide William for ever, and to noe other vse intente or purpose. In 
"Wyttnes whereof the partyes above saide to these presente Indentures 
enterchaungeablelye have put to theire handes and Seales the daye and 
yeare ffirst above written 

Will'm Brokett 
Sealed & deliuered by the handes of William Brockett in the 
presence of 

Will'm Hardinge Scr' 

Edward Amcottes 

Sara Brokett. 
Sealed & deliuered by the handes of Sara Brockett in the 
presence of 

Will'm Hardinge Scr' 

Edward Amcottes 

Olliver Haward. 
Seals. On a wreath a stag couchant, chained. 
(Endorsed) 

Midd. ss. Rychard Spencer tenaunte of the lands within mencioned 
xxiij th of June the yere within written did deliver vnto the within named 
Leonard Bawtree six pence in the name of attornement & seisin of the 
rent in the presence of 

Edmond Fryers. , No. 109. 

(33) 
Counterpart of the above, executed by " Leo. Bawtree." Sealed and 
delivered in the presence of Will'm Hardinge, Edward Amcotts, Oliver 
Haward. Seal, A chevron between three iVb. 110. 

(34) 
SO May This Indenture made the thirtieth day of Maye in the 
1603. yeare of our Lorde God one thowsand six hundred and three 
and in the raigne of our most gracious soveraigne lord James 



120 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

by the grace of God of England Scotlande Fraunce and Ireland Kinge 
defender of the faith &c. in the firste yeare of his raigne of England 
Fraunce and Ireland and in the six and thirtieth yeare of his raigne 
of Scotland Betweene William Brokett of Wildhill in the countie of 
Hertford gent' and Sara his wief on thone parte and Eichard Spenser 
of Quidhampton in the countie of Wiltes yeoman on thother parte 
Witnesseth that the said William Brokett and Sara his wief in 
consideracion of the somme of one thowsand poundes of currant 
Englishe money unto them the saide William Brokett and Sara by the 
saide Richard Spenser at and before thensealinge and delyveringe 
heereof well and trulie satisfied and payed whereof and wherewith they 
the said William Brokett and Sara doe acknowledge themselves to be 
satisfied and thereof and of everie parte and parcell thereof doe fullie 
cleerelie and absolutelie acquite and discharge the saide Richard 
Spenser his heires executors and admynistrators by theise presentes 
have graunted bargayned sould alyened enfeoffed conveyed remysed 
released and confirmed and by theise presentes doe graunte bargayne 
sell alyen enfeoff convey remyse release & confirme unto the saide 
Richard Spenser his heires and assignes all that the mannor lordshippe 
and farrne of Quidhampton with the appurtenaunees scituat and beinge 
in or neare the parishe of Wroughton alias Elingdon in the said countie 
of Wiltes And all and singuler the mesuages cottages howses buyldinges 
gardens orchardes courtes yeardes curtiladges landes tenementes 
meadowes leasowes pastures feedinges woodes underwoodes and trees of 
in and upon the premisses or any parte thereof growinge and beinge 
and all the grownde and soyle of the said woodes and underwoodes 
commons fishinges wastes waste growndes rentes reversions services 
profits commodities emolumentes and hereditamentes whatsoever nowe 
or heeretofore held used occupied or enjoyed by the said Richard 
Spenser or to him demised or letten as parte parcell or member of or asi; 
belonginge or appertayninge to the said mannor lordshippe or farme and 
the reversion and reversions remaynder and remaynders of all and 
singuler the said mannor lordshippe farme and premisses and of everie 
parte and parcell thereof And all rentes and yearlie profites that are 
reserved out of or for the same or any parte thereof together with all 
deedes Charters evidences writinges terrars escriptes and mynimentes 
concerninge onlie the said mannor lordshippe farme and other the 
premisses or onlie any parte thereof To have and to holde the said 
mannor lordship farme and all other the premisses with thappurtenaunces 
together with the said deedes Charters evidences mynimentes escriptes 
and writinges unto the saide Richard Spenser his heires and assignes to 
thonlie sole and proper use & behoofe of the said Richard Spenser his 
heires and assignes for ever And the said William Brokett and Sara 
for them and theire heires doe covenaunte promyse graunte and agree 
to & with the said Richard Spenser his heires and assignes that all fynes 
recoveries and all other conveyances and assurances heretofore made 
or hereafter to be had and made of the said mannor farme and premisses 
or of any parte thereof by the said William Brokett & Sara or either of 



The Society's 3£SS. Quidhampton. 121 

them theire or either of theire heires or whereunto they or either of 
them shalbe partie shalbe and shalbe deemed taken construed and 
adjudged to be to the use of the said Eichard Spenser and of his heires 
and assignes for ever and to none other use intent or purpose And 
the saide William Brokett and Sara his wief and theire heyres and the 
heyres of either of them all and singuler the saide mannor lordshippe 
farme and premysses with thappurtenaunces to the said Eichard Spenser 
his heires and assignes against the said William Brokett and Sara & 
theire heires and assignes and against the heires and assignes of the 
said Sara shall and will warrant and defende for ever by theise presentes 
In witnes whereof the parties first above named to theise presentes 
interchangeablie have put to theire handes and seales the day and yeare 
first above written 

Will'm Brokett Sara Brokett 

Two seals originally, that to the name of Sara cut off'; the other, a 
seal of arms, a cross fori/. Crest, a buck trippant. 

Endorsed Sealed and delivered in the presence of Thomas Hutchyns 
Will'm Brende John Spenser William Vincent Signum Joh'is (I. K.) 
Kington 

Irrotulator in dorso Claus' Cancellar' infrascripti domini regis primo 
die Junii anno infrascripto per Jacobum Husbandes. 

At foot, on face Capt' et recognit' per utrumque coram me Thoma 
Legge Cancellarie magistro die et anno suprascriptis. Willielmus Breme 
de Staple Inne London generosus testatur noticiam partium. 

No. 111. 

(35) 
30 May, This indenture made the thirtieth day of Maye in the yeare 
1603. of our Lord one thowsand sixe hundred and three And in the 

raigne of our moste gracious soveraigne lorde James by the grace 
of God of England Scotland France and Ireland kinge defender of the 
faith &c. in the first yeare of his raigne of England France and Ireland 
and in the sixe and thirtieth yeare of his raigne of Scotland Betweene 
William Brokett of Wildhill in the countie of Hertford gentleman and 
Sara his wief on thone part and Eichard Spenser of Quidhampton in the 
countie of Wiltes' yeoman on thother parte Whereas the said William 
Brokett and Sara his wief by theire deede indented bearinge date the 
day of the date of theise presentes for & in consideracion of the somme 
of one thowsand powndes to them in hand by the said Eichard Spenser 
well and trulie payed have graunted bargayned sould aliened conveyed 
released and confirmed or mencioned to graunt bargayne sell alyen 
convey rernyse release & confirme unto the said Eichard Spenser his 
heires & assignes for ever All that the mannor lordship & farme of 
Quidhampton with thappurtenaunces in or neare the parishe of 
Wroughton alias Elingdon in the countie of Wiltes to have and to 
holde to the said Eichard Spenser his heires & assignes to thonlie use 
& behoof of the said Eichard Spenser his heires & assignes for ever as in 
& by the said deede indented (whereunto for more certentie relacion 



122 The Society's MSB. Quidhampton. 

being had) more at large yfc doth and may appears Nowe this 
Indenture witnesseth that the saide William Brokett and Sara his 
wief & either of them doe and doeth for them theire heires executors & 
admynistrators & everie of them covenaunte promyse & graunte to & 
. with the said Eiehard Spencer his heires & assignes by theise presentes 
That they the said William Brokett and Sara his wief or one of them 
are or weare at this tyme of thensealinge and delyveringe of the said 
deede indented heerein recited lawfully seazed of & in all and singuler 
the said mannor lordship farme and premisses with thappurtenaunces & 
everie parte and parcell thereof of a good pure & lawfull estate in fee 
symple or fee tayle generall in reversion ymediatlie expectant upon 
thestate for lief of the said Richard Spenser And that they the said 
William and Sara or one of them have or hath good right full power & 
lawfull authoritie to graunt bargayne & sell the said mannor lordship 
farme & premisses & everie part thereof with thappurtenaunces unto the 
said Richard Spenser his heires and assignes for ever unto the use of 
him the said Richard Spenser his heires and assignes for ever in manner 
and forme aforesaid And the said William Brokett and Sara his wief 
& either of them doe and doth for themselves theire heires executors & 
admynistrators & everie of them covenaunte promyse & graunt to & 
with the said Richard Spenser his heires and assignes by theise presentes 
that he the said Richard Spenser his heires and assignes shall or may 
peaceablie & quietlie have holde occupie possesse & enjoy all & singuler 
the said mannor lordship farme & premisses & everie part and parcell 
thereof with thappurtenaunces discharged or otherwise uppon reasonable 
request well & sufficientlie saved harmeles of & from all & all manner 
of former bargaynes sales guyftes grauntes leases estates joyntures 
dowers uses wills entayles statutes marchant & of the staple recogni- 
zaunces execucions judgementes rentes charges rente secke arrerages of 
rentes intrusions forfeitures fynes for alienacion & of & from all & all 
manner of other charges tytles trowbels & incombrances whatsoever 
hail made committed acknowledged suffered or donne or heereafter to be 
had made committed acknowledged suffered or donne by the said 
William and Sara or by Thomas Crane esquior deceased father of the 
said Sara or by their or either of theire heires or assignes or by any 
other person or persons lawfullie clayminge or dery vinge any estate right 
title interest or demaunde of in or to the said mannor lordship farme & 
premisses or of in or to any parte or parcell thereof in by from or under 
him them or any of them theire heires or assignes And the said 
William Brokett and Sara his wief doe & either of them doth for them- 
selves theire heires executors & administrators & for everie of them by 
theise presentes covenaunte promyse & graunte to & with the said 
Richard Spenser his heires and assignes That they the said William & 
Sara & theire & either of theire heires shall and will at and upon 
reasonable request to them or any of them to be made within the space 
of fyve yeares next ensueinge the date hereof and at the costes and 
charges of the said Richard Spenser his heires and assignes doe make 
acknowledge suffer & execute or cause to be donne made acknowledged 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 123 

suffered & executed all & everie such other & further acte & actes 
thinge & thinges devise & devises assurance assurances & conveyances in 
the law whatsoever for the more further better & perfecte assurance 
suretie & sure makinge and conveyinge of all & singuler the said 
mannor lordship farme & premisses & everie parte and parcell thereof 
with thappurtenaunces unto the said Eichard Spenser his heires & 
assignes to the use of the said Eichard his heires & assignes for ever 
as shalbe reasonablie devised or advised by the said Richard Spenser his 
heires & assignes or by his or their councell learned in the law Be it 
"by fyne or fynes deede or deedes inrolled or not inrolled or inrollment 
of theise presentes or other assurances heereupon made feoffment 
recoverie or recoveries with voucher or vouchers or by all theise wayes 
& meanes or by any other way or meanes whatsoever So as the said 
"William and Sara or theire heires be not compelled to travayle for the 
doinge makinge or executinge of any such assurances further then to 
the citties of London or Westmynster And yt is fullie concluded 
condiscended & agreed upon by & betweene the said parties to theise 
presentes That all and singuler assurances & conveyances as well heere- 
tofore had or made as heereafter to be had & made of the said mannor 
lordship farme and premisses with thappurtenaunces or of any parte 
thereof by the said William Brokett & Sara & theire heires or any of 
them or whereunto they or any of them shalbe partie shalbe & shall 
inure & shalbe deemed accepted reputed construed adjudged taken & 
expounded to be to the use of the said Eichard Spenser his heires & 
assignes & to none other use intent or purpose accordinge as in the 
recited indenture is mencioned and declared And the said William & 
Sara & either of them doe & doth for them theire heires executors & 
admynistrators & for everie of them covenaunte promyse graunte & 
agree to & with the said Eichard Spenser his heires & assignes by theise 
presentes that they the said AVilliam & Sara shall and will delyver or 
cause to be delyvered unto the said Eichard Spenser his heires & 
assignes before the feast of Christmas next ensueinge the date heereof 
whole safe uncancelled & undefaced or in as good case as the same 
nowe be all & singuler such deedes charters evidences writinges terrars 
esscriptes letters patentes & mynnmentes towchinge or concerninge 
onlie the premisses or onlie any parte thereof which they the said 
William & Sara or either of them nowe hath or have in his her or theire 
custodie or possession or may be in the custodie or possession of any 
other by his her or theire delyverie or that they or either of them 
knowinge where they are may lawfullie gett or come by without suyte 
in the lawe And also the true coppies of all other deedes charters 
escriptes & writinges which doe touch or concerne the premisses joyntlie 
with any other landes tenementes and hereditamentes the same coppies 
to be written out at the eostes & charges of the said Eichard Spenser his 
heires & assignes And the said William Brokett & Sara & either of 
them doe & doth hereby further covenaunte promyse & graunte for 
them & theire heires executors & admynistrators & everie of them to & 
with the said Eichard Spenser his heires & assignes That they the said 



124 The Society's MSS. Qtoidhampton. 

William & Sara theire 'heires executors & admynistrators shall & will 
upon request to be made to the said William & Sara & at the costes & 
charges of the said Richard his heires & assignes delyver shewe 
foorth & gyve in evidence all & singuler such deedes evidences & 
writinges which doe concerne the said bargayned premisses joyritlie 
with any other landes which they or either of them have or they shall 
have in theire possession or may gett or come by without suyte in lawe 
for the defendinge preservinge upholdinge & maynetayninge of the 
state right title & interest of the said Eichard Spencer his heires & 
assignes of & into the premisses when & as often as the said Richard 
Spenser his heires or assignes shalbe sued or ympleaded for the same or 
any parte thereof or when as any other just neede or occasions shall 
soe require In Witnes Whereof the parties first above named to 
theise presentes interchangeablie have put to their handes & seales the 
day & yeare first above written 

William Beokett Saea Beokett 

Seals, as next above. Witnesses, as above. Endorsed The Deede 
of covenauntes from Mr. Broker of Quidhampton. No. 113. 

(36) 
Easter term 1603. Indentures of a fine between Richard Spencer 
plaintiff and William Brockett and Sarah his wife deforciants of the 
mannor of Quidhampton cum pertinenciis and one messuage 140 acres 
of land 60 acres of meadow 100 acres of pasture 4 acres of wood & 10 
acres of furze and heath cum pertinenciis in Elingdon Wroughton 
Salthrop & Quidhampton. 

[To be continued]. 



Tube made from leg bone of a Bird, \. 




Plate I.— Objects from Midden, near Oare, \. 

„ T-i i t? Trnn Fibula C. — Bronze Tweezers. 

A. Bronze Fibula ti- — i ron riuuia. <-,. 

D. — Iron Nail-cleaner. 




Bone Objects from Midden, near Oare. 
C. — Scoop or Spoon. D. — Handle of Comb. 




Plate III. — Objects of Pottery from Midden, near Oare. £. 

A, B, C, D, G — Pieces of Pot perforated for Spindle Whorls. E.— Half of 
roughly cubical Whorl ? F. — Sling Bullet. H. — Portion of Strainer. 






Plate IV. 
Late Celtic Pottery from rubbish heap at Oare. 




Plate V. 
Late Celtic Pottery from rubbish heap at Oare. 




Plate VI. 
Late Celtic Pottery from rubbish heap at Oare. 




Plate VII. 
Late Celtic Pottery from rubbish heap at Oare. 



121 



NOTES ON A LATE CELTIC KUBBISH HEAP, 
NEAE OAEE. 

By Maud E. Cunnington. 

[Head at the Salisbury Meeting of the Society, 1908.] 

In Withy Copse on the Eainscombe estate and about a mile 
north-east from the village of Oare, 1 an ancient rubbish heap 
presenting the appearance of a low irregularly-shaped mound, is 
now the only visible sign that the place was ever the site of human 
habitation. 

To-day the spot is a secluded and lonely one, and its chief in- 
habitants are the rabbits, who find the mound easy to burrow in, 
and to whose unaided efforts the discovery of the interesting nature 
■of their home was in the first place due. 

Mr. F. N. Eogers, M.P., of Eainscombe, to whom the land 
belongs, noticed that the rabbits constantly worked out fragments 
of pottery from the mound. Some of this pottery he sent to Mr. 
B. H. Cunnington, Hon. Curator of the Museum at Devizes, and 
at his suggestion Mr. Eogers cut a trench into the mound, and 
subsequently with great kindness gave Mr. Cunnington permission 
to excavate the mound thoroughly. The work was carried out 
in the autumn of 1907 and the spring of 1908. 

Withy Copse lies on sloping ground just to the north of Martin- 
sell Camp ; on its upper side the copse is bounded by the ditch 
and rampart of the Camp, and the mound itself is only a hundred 
yards from the rampart. The mound is 63ft. long from south- 
west to north-east, 43ft. across at the widest part, and is nowhere 
higher than 2|ft. above the level of the ground. It is entirely 
composed of a fine black mould of the same character throughout, 
and with no old surface or bedding of any kind visible in section. 

1 This rubbish heap has in the last volume of the Magazine being variously 
referred to as situated at Martinsell, Eainscombe, and Oare. 



126 Notes on a Late Celtic Rubbish Heap near Oare. 

Under the fringe of the mound on the side farthest away from 
the Camp the undisturbed ground was not reached, as there was 
found to be a drop below the natural level into a filled-in ditch or 
excavation of some kind. This ditch, if such it be, may be con- 
nected with a dwelling which the presence of the rubbish heap 
shows must once have stood near this spot. It was a temptation 
to follow out this excavation on the chance of locating the site of 
the dwelling, but it was thought wiser not to embark on an under- 
taking that would probably prove too extensive to be carried to 
anything like a satisfactory finish. At present the copse is a thick 
tangle of hazel bushes and undergrowth, which makes digging 
difficult, and also renders it impossible to detect surface inequali- 
ties that might otherwise show where the foundations, if any, are 
likely to be. 

Bones of animals and a great quantity of potsherds were found 
scattered all through the heap, but they were noticeably more 
numerous near the surface and just under the turf. This accumu- 
lation near the surface is no doubt due to a simple and natural 
process of denudation. As the mass of decaying matter settled 
down the fine mould would be washed through the comparatively 
large and indestructible pieces of bone and pottery, and thus these 
would in time get accumulated in a layer or seam of no great 
thickness, and not very much above the level of the original floor 
of the heap. The same kind of action may be noticed on ploughed 
land. It is nearly useless to walk over a quite newly tilled field 
in search of surface relics, but after the ground has been left open 
for a few weeks or months it will be found that the loose soil has 
been washed down leaving the stones and other hard objects bare 
on the surface. 

On account of the large quantity of potsherds it has been 
suggested that the mound was the accumulated debris of a pottery ; 
but there is really no evidence of this being so. None of the 
pottery shows any signs of distortion in the baking such as wasters 
from a kiln would show ; nor were any objects found that are 
particularly likely to have been used by a potter. The large 
number of fragmentary bones of animals, of which sheep, pig, and ox 



By 3Iaud E. Cunningion. 127 

are by far the most common ; all the pottery being without a single 
exception in fragments ; and the occasional occurrence of other 
relics, odds and ends, all of which, with scarcely an exception, had 
been broken or rendered useless before they were thrown away, 
makes it as clear as any such evidence can, that the heap is simply 
an accumulation of rubbish from some dwelling that doubtless 
stood at no great distance from the spot. 

Although so near to Martinsell Camp, it does not of course 
necessarily follow that the dwelling that must once have stood 
here had any real association with the camp. It is unfortunate, 
that, as is the case with most of the early and pre-historic camps 
of Wiltshire, the date of Martinsell is unknown. 

Fortunately it has been found possible from the evidence of the 
relics, more particularly from that of the pottery and of the fibula?, 
to give within reasonable limits a date for the accumulation of the 
rubbish. Speaking generally of the pottery sent to him Mr. 
Eeginald Smith, of the British Museum, remarks : — " So far as I 
can judge, it all dates from the early years of our era. The purely 
British type of pottery is well represented." The probable date 
of the fibulae also agrees well with that given by the pottery. 
There need, then, be little hesitation in assigning as the date of 
the formation of the rubbish heap the early years of the first 
century A.D., and perhaps the declining years of the last century 
B.C. — that is to say the period between the invasion of Julius 
Cresar and the final conquest of Britain in the reign of the Emperor 
Claudius. The evidence on which this date is partly based is en- 
tered into in more detail in the description of the pottery which 
follows. 

It must surely have been a household of wealth and importance 
that could indulge, at this early date, at a spot as remote as Oare, 
their taste for refined and delicate table ware imported from distant 
centres of manufacture on the Continent. The near neighbour- 
hood of the dwelling to the big camp of Martinsell makes one 
wonder if there was any connection between these two events, the 
abandonment of the dwelling and the occupation of the country 
by the Bomans. It would indeed be interesting to know to what 
period the camp belongs. 



128 Notes on a Late Celtic Rubbish Heap, near Oare. 

Pottery. 

The mound contained such a large quantity of pottery that it 
was found impracticable to carry it all away; therefore only rim 
pieces, bases, and ornamented or otherwise characteristic pieces 
were kept, even these filling four large baskets, each as much as 
a man could carry. 

By thus taking the rims only into account it was thought that 
as good an idea of the numbers, shapes, and descriptions of the 
pottery generally could be gained as by dealing with a greatly 
increased number of small and uncharacteristic sherds. 

Taken as a whole the pottery may be roughly divided into two 
classes : that which is probably of native manufacture, and that of 
foreign importation. 1 The quantity of the latter is small in pro- 
portion to that of the former, there being only seventy-eight foreign 
fragments (and these not all rims) against eight hundred and 
sixty-three native. Of these eight hundred and sixty-three pieces 
five hundred and sixty-four all belonged to one type of vessel, 
namely, bowls with a perfectly simple or slightly beaded rim (PL 
IV., A. and C. ; PI. VII. H. and ¥.). It seems, therefore, that bowls 
were more commonly used than any other form of earthenware 
vessel by the people who accumulated this rubbish heap. 2 

These bowls are of not inelegant outline, with slightly contracted 
mouth, beaded rim, and with a shoulder more or less rounded from 
which they taper to a base often small in proportion to the size of 

1 Some years ago pottery kilns were discovered at Broomsgrove Farm, in 
Milton Lilbourne parish, near Pewsey. This would not be much more than a 
mile from Withy Copse. Some of the pottery from the kilns is not unlike 
that from the mound, and it seems not unlikely that it may have been made 
in these or neighbouring kilns. General Pitt-Rivers identified the pottery 
from the kilns as Romano-British, but there may have been kilns on the 
same site for a long period. Wilts Arch. Mag., xxvii., 294. 

2 General Pitt-Rivers found it a common type at the Romano-British 
villages of Woodcuts and Rotherly, but scarce at Woodyates. Excavations, 
vol. III., pp. 17, 53. Evidence led him to the inference that bead rims may 
have been in earlier use than other kinds of vessels (at the villages) and that 
they were apparently in commoner use among the poorer than among the 
richer inhabitants. Excavations, vol. II., 144-5. This is what might be 
expected with a vessel of native type. 



By Maud E. Cmmington. 129 

the vessel, and sometimes rounded. They are of all sizes, from 
little things a few inches in diameter holding perhaps a gill, to 
large heavy vessels,the capacity of which might have been measured 
in gallons. There are, however, comparatively few very small or 
very large ; the majority of them being apparently from about 
6in. to 8in. in diameter at the shoulder, and from 5in. to 7in. high. 
Perhaps the smaller and medium sizes were used for eating out of 
and for cooking purposes, while the larger ones would have served 
well as receptacles for storing all kinds of food. Indeed many of 
the pieces seem to show where they have been in contact with 
fire ; and in many instances it is noticeable that the surface from 
the rim to the shoulder is in a better state of preservation than 
that of the lower part. In some cases there is quite a sharp line at the 
shoulder where the colour and appearance of the ware differs dis- 
tinctly. If these pots were used for cooking by placing them in, or 
on,hot charcoal,some such difference might have resulted from a con- 
stant repetition of a fiercer heat below. Much of the Italian cookery 
is done even now in earthenware vessels which are placed in 
charcoal, and pots of the shape so common at Oare seems peculiarly 
well suited to the purpose. The quality of the paste of the bowls 
varies considerably. Generally speaking the larger vessels are of 
' coarse, and the smaller and medium sizes of finer material. Some 
i of the paste is mixed with a micaceous sand, and some with 
pounded flint or quartz. The paste of some of the largest bowls 
is very coarse, and is freely mixed with large grains of flint, pounded 
' brick, charcoal, and occasionally even with iron pyrites. 

Grey is the preponderating colour, in every shade from very 
■ pale to black ; other fragments are brown in shades varying from 
, pale buff to chocolate, breaking out occasionally to a bright red. 
A single fragment may show bright red, brown, and grey in its 
different parts, and the greys and browns shade off into one another 
in such a way that it is often difficult to know under which heading 
they should be placed. It seems, therefore, that the colouring 
is merely a matter of firing or of artificial colouring, and does not 
necessarily show any difference in the material or place of origin 
of the pottery. 

VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. K 



130 'Notes on a Late Celtic Rubbish Heap, near Oare. 

The surfaces are often very smooth, finely tooled and polished. 
The bowls are all quite free of ornament, but a few have a band 
of incised lines, or "cordons" round their shoulders (PL V.,C,E.)' 

The pottery of the other vessels of probably native make shows 
the same characteristics as that of the bowls. There are one 
hundred and fifty fragments of pots and jars, generally with 
curving rims, 1 and sometimes showing trellis and zigzag line- 
decorations (PI. V., A ; PL VII., G, D. ; PL VI., B, C, D). 

Pound covers with circular basin-shaped handle knobs seem to 
have been in fairly common use (PL VII., E) ; of these there are 
seventy-nine fragments, including eleven handles. 

Of plates or saucers there are only twenty-five fragments 
(PL IV., F), a curiously small number according to our modern 
usages in proportion to that of the bowls, the explanation 
probably being that dishes and platters of wood were used in- 
stead of those of earthenware. All the pottery, including the 
bowls, appears to be wheel-turned, and is well made, and well baked. 

Mr. A. G. Wright, of the Corporation Museum, Colchester, very 
kindly examined and reported upon specimens of the pottery, and 
later, at his suggestion, specimens were sent to Mr. Peginald Smith, 
at the British Museum, who also very kindly made notes upon 
them. The bowl with the bead rim so common at Oare, is it 
appears, of a purely British type and characteristic of Late-Celtic 
pottery. This type appears in the local ware from Weymouth,. 
in the British Museum, and among the Late-Celtic pottery in the 
Colchester Museum. 

Figures C and E on Plate IV are described by Mr. Smith as 
" very characteristic Late-Celtic pieces." 2 Fig. C is suggestive of 
a metal prototype, and it is interesting to find that it bears a close 
resemblance to a small bronze cup found with a Late-Celtic burial 
group at Colchester, which is said to date from about 150 B.C. 

1 Basin-shaped rims with upright flanges are conspicuous by their 
absence. It is apparently a later type. See General Pitt-Eivers' Excavations^ 
vol. II., 168. 

2 Fig. E PL IV. is shown as conjecturally restored on the analogy of similar 
vessels from Rotherley, Pitt-Eivers, II. PL CIX., Fig. 1, and an example in 
the Spitty Coll. at Colchester, No. 1616. 



By Maud E. Cannington. 131 

Fragments of larger vessels of very coarse buff-coloured ware from 
Oare are identical with some in the Colchester Museum from 
Shoebury ; they " might have been made in the same workshop." 
Some of the fine black ware from Oare is said to be a local imitation 
of the Belgic black ware, of which at least one genuine example 
was found at Oare (PI. VI. E). 

The following is a description of some of the more interesting 
and important pieces of pottery of foreign manufacture : — 

A fragment of Belgic black ware of the first century A.D. 
characterised by its low foot rim (PI. VI. E). 

A similar piece of fine grey ware with low foot rim (PL V. B). 
A small fragment of green glazed Eoman ware, rare in this 
country, and no doubt imported from G-aul early in the first 
century AD. 1 

Several pieces of very thin white and cream-coloured pottery, 
perfectly baked, hard and smooth, like unglazed china ; possibly 
imported from Eheims in the first century A.D. 

Fragments of similar ware, some of which are not quite so fine 
or white, with " roulette " or " engine-turned " ornament (PL 
VII., B). Others have a feathered zizgag ornament (PL VII,, 
A and C). 

Fine micaceous buff-coloured ware, painted grey on the outside, 
red on the inside. There are examples of a similar ware at 
Colchester (PI. IV, D). 

Fragments of painted red pottery, some of which are of ex- 
ceptionally fine quality. 

The pottery shows examples of painting in black, white, red, 
brown, and grey ; also a clear glaze or varnish of some kind ; 
and in one instance a vitrified green glaze. 

Part of the base of a small dish or shallow bowl of Arretine 
ware, with part of stamp of maker's name (PL V D). Mr. 
Eeginald Smith says that this stamp is unfortunately unknown, 
but that it seems to end in PLEV. Another fragment of 
Arretine ware, part of a flat dish with a low foot rim, also bears 

1 A quantity of green glazed ware believed to be Eoman, has lately occurred 
(at Lansdown, near Bath, and at Colbren, S. Wales. 

K 2 



132 Notes on a Late Celtic Hitbbish Heap, near Oare. 

part of the maker's stamp ; the first two letters AT are quite 
clear, and it is perhaps that of ATIIIVS (ATEIVS), of whose 
stamp there is an example in the British Museum (PI. VI. A). 1 
Eight other small fragments of Arretine ware. 
A single base of a characteristic Late-Celtic pedestal vase 
(PI. V. F) was found, and it is possible that the cordoned frag- 
ments (PI. V., C and E) may belong to a similar vessel. 
The fragments of Arretine ware are of special interest, for not 
only is it rare in Britain, 2 but they help to date the find with a 
considerable degree of accuracy. This red painted ware takes its 
name from the Italian town of Arezzo (Arretium), which was the 
centre of its production in the first and second centuries B.C., and 
the first years of the first century AD. At about this latter date 
the art of making this ware was introduced into Gaul, and potteries 
were established there. The earliest Gaulish factories were 
probably started by potters from Italy, who at first made pottery 
in imitation of, or similar to, that of Arezzo. 

If the name of the potter on the fragment of Arretine ware from 
Oare is indeed that of Ateius, as Mr. Smith thinks probable, it is 
particularly interesting. The name is well known, and seems to 
have been that of a large and important manufacturer. His stamp 

1 This pottery was shortly described aod illustrated by three drawings in 
a paper " On some Fragments of Arretine ware and other pottery, from a 
Late-Celtic Rubbish Heap at Oare, Wilts," by M. E. Cunnington, in The 
Reliquary, January, 1909, Vol. xv., pp. 57 — 61; also in a paper in Man, 
February, 1909, " Notes on a Late-Celtic Rubbish Heap near Oare, Wiltshire," 
pp. 18 — 21, six illustrations. 

2 Mr. H. B. Walters, of the British Museum, writing in the Proc. Cambridge 
Antiq. Soe., No. XLVIIL, 1908, on "An Arretine Vase in the Cambridge 
Archaeological Museum," says " The Cambridge Vase stands almost by itself 
as an example of an Arretine ornamented Vase exported to Britain. But 
fragmentary specimens are not unknown. There are some half-dozen in the 
British Museum, all found in London. And another was recently found at 
Bicester, in Oxfordshire, and exhibited by Professor Haverfield at the Society 
of Antiquaries (1907). Proc. Soc. Ant., xxi., 462, jig. Plain Vases with j 
Arretine stamps are also sometimes found. But all or nearly all of these 
must belong to the period before the conquest by Claudius, and are only ' 
accidental exportations." There is a vase in the Beading Museum by ATEIVS 
from Silchester. The fragment from Alchester near Bicester, mentioned I 
above is in the Ashmolean Museum. 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 133 

occurs frequently on pottery found at Eome, and in the Italian 
Provinces, and at Arezzo itself ; it occurs also frequently in the 
Gaulish Provinces, and even as far afield as Egypt. He may have 
been one of the pioneers who carried this Italian industry into 
Gaul, for the actual site of his workshops is still uncertain ; it may 
have been either in Northern Italy or Southern Gaul ; one authority 
thinking it not improbable that he had works in both these 
localities. 1 

The date of this potter is, however, less uncertain, various dis- 
coveries going to prove that he was in full activity during the reign 
of Augustus. To give one instance only, the stamp of Ateivs has 
been found at Haltern, in Westphalia, a site that is known to have 
been abandoned by the Eomans in the year 16 A.D. 

The later Gaulish potters eventually struck out on new lines of 
their own, and seem by successful competition to have practically 
shut up the potteries of Arezzo, and to have traded their wares to 
all parts of the Empire, even into Italy and to Eome itself. It is 
this late red glazed Gaulish ware that is usually known in this 
country as " Samian " ware. Discoveries at Pompeii show that 
this later Gaulish red ware* was being made and exported before 
79 A.D., and other discoveries show the manufacture to have been 
in full activity by the year 100 A.D. 2 The absence, therefore, of 
this ware from the rubbish heap at Oare affords interesting negative 
evidence, confirming the early date of the site. It is only reasonable 
to suppose that people who were in a position to use imported 
foreign wares, such as the red Arretine and black and white Belgic 
and Gaulish wares, would also have had some of the red Gaulish 
" Samian " so comparatively common at a little later date, had 
it been already in the market in their time. The fact of its com- 
mon occurrence on Eomano-British sites of a little later date 
emphasizes its absence from Oare. 

1 For particulars of the potter ATEIVS see " Les Vases Ceramiques 
Ornes de la Gaule Romaine" by J. Dechelette, 1904, p. 16 ; and Mr. H. B. 
"Walter's paper on an Arretine Vase in ths Proc. Cambridge Antiquarian 
Society, No. XL VIII., 1908. 

* " Les Vases Ceramiques Ornes de la Gaule Romaine" Dechelette. 



134 Notes on a Late Celtic Rubbish Heap, near Oare. 

Descriptive List of Objects Found. 

Bronze Tweezers. Length 2in., (PI. I. C) . 

Bronze Bow Fibula (PI. LA). T -shaped head with long spring 
secured over a hook at the back of the bow. The catch plate has 
probably been pierced with holes, now broken, pin missing. Length 
3in. Cf. Very similar examples from Eotherly and Woodcuts 
Eomano-British Villages; Pitt Pavers' Excavations, I., 49, Fig. 10 ; 
Examples of both this and the following fibula occurred in 
association with Late Celtic remains at Hod Hill, Dorset, and 
are now in the British Museum. It probably dates from between 
50 B.C. and 50 A.D. 

Iron Fibula of the safety-pin pattern (PI. L, B). Made of one 
piece of stout iron wire ; point of pin and catch missing. Of La 
Tene TIL type. An identical fibula was found at the Eomano- 
British village of Eotherley by General Pitt Eivers (Excavations, 
vol. II. 126, Fig. 6), it is also very like a bronze specimen from 
Aylesford in the British Museum. The date assigned to this type 
of fibula by Mr. Eeginald Smith is from B.C. 50 to A.D. 50. Cf. 
W.A.M., xxxv., 402. 

Small Iron Bow Fibula ; much rusted, pin and spring missing. 
Length, \\ in. 

Iron Arrow-head, socketed, with flat blade and long broad barbs, 
one barb missing. Length, 4J in. (PI. II., C). 

Similar arrow-heads were found at Eotherley and Wpodcuts,but 
on or near the surface, and General Pitt-Bivers remarks that 
those with long barbs are usually supposed to be mediaeval and 
that more information would be desirable as to the positions in 
which they are found (Excavations, III., 40). The finding there- 
fore of this one with remains of such an early date as those of 
Oare is interesting. There is, however, a specimen in the Ashmolean I 
Museum from the Late-Celtic and Eomano-British site of Wood 
Eaton, Oxon ; and another in Bath Museum, found with Eoman| 
remains at Lansdown, 1905. 

An iron object suggestive in appearance of a small hammerl 
head, but possibly the guard of a sword or dagger. Length, 2>\ in. 



By Maud E, Cunnington. 135 

{PL II., E). A similar object from the Glastonbury Lake Village 
is figured in Proc. Somerset Arch. Society, LI. I. 90. Examples are 
also figured from the early site of Stradonic on the Continent. 

Large sickle-shaped Iron Door Key, point missing, loop at end of 
handle. Length in straight line from tip to end of handle, 11 in. 
<P1. II. B). 

Small piece of curved iron, possibly the point of the key. 
Length, 2\ in. (PL II., B). 

Precisely similar keys are in the British Museum from the Late 
•Celtic sites of Spettisbury and Hod Hill, Dorset. Gen. Pitt- 
Eivers figures others from theEomano-British villages of Botherley, 
Woodcuts, and Woodyates, and from a dwelling pit outside Martin 
Down^Camp. Excavations, I., 75 ; II, 136 ; III., 138 ; IV., 207 ; 
one from Bushall Down and one from Westbury are in the Devizes 
I Museum, another from the Boman Villa at Coombe Down, found 
! 1860, is in the Museum at Bath. 

Sickle-shaped Key, similar to, but smaller than the last, in very 
.good condition and unbroken. Length, 7f in. (PL II., A). 

Small iron object with loop at one end (PL I., D). It resembles 
a watch key, and is perhaps a nail cleaner with the point broken 
j off. Length, If in. 

Plat strip of iron with two holes for rivets. 2 in. x 1 in. 

Seven iron nails with large flat heads, and three pieces of iron 
!bent over at one end, possibly staples (PL II., E). 

Part of an iron tool, square in section, but flattened at the end. 
A small chisel. Length, 4 in. 

Iron object, perhaps a bridle bit (PI. II., D). It is made of a 

strip of iron, curved round and welded so as to form a loop at 

either end with a solid bar between ; an iron ring is still linked 

I into one of the loops. Length from end to end of the loops 5^in. ; 

, diameter of ring, about 2 in. Ancient bridle-bits do not seem 

; always to have had a link or swivel in the centre of the mouthpiece, 

see iron bit from Stanwick, bronze hit from Bise, Holderness, 

Arclmologia, LX., p. 251 ; also Munro's Lake Dwellings of Europe, 

p. 287, Fig. 15, 16; p. 524, Fig. 8. The size is about what it 

should be for a bit. 



136 Notes on a Late Celtic RuVbish Heap, near Oare. 

Sling bullet of baked clay, length l|in. (PI. III., F.). It is a 
little curious that no slingstone, or sling bullet, should have been 
found in any of the excavations that were made by General Pitt- 
Eivers in the Komano-British villages, &c, in S. Wilts. He only 
mentions having found two, one in the Wansdyke and one at Mt. 
Caburn, near Lewes. Yet they do not seem to be generally very 
rare in Wilts ; they have been found at Beckhampton, Cold Kitchen 
Hill, Highfield near Salisbury, and Oare, and one was picked up 
on the surface in a field near Devizes, where there are plentiful 
Boman remains (Mother Antony's Well). Similar sling stones 
have also been found at the Glastonbury Lake village, and seem to 
be more especially associated with objects of late Celtic date. 

Large Spindlewhorl, roughly made out of the base of a pot of 
brownish ware. Diameter, 2fin. (PI. III., D.). 

Large Spindlewhorl, similarly made out of the base of a pot of 
coarse red ware. Diameter, 3^in., imperfect. (PI. III., G.). 

Small Spindlewhorl of grey pottery, chipped and ground into 
shape, hole not central. Diameter, lin. (PI. III., C). 

Spindlewhorl of grey pottery, chipped into shape, hole not 
central. Diameter, 2in. (PL III., A.). 

Spindlewhorl made from a rough fragment of grey pottery. No 
attempt appears to have been made to chip it into a round form. 
Diameter, about lfin. (PI. III., B.). 

Part of a small Spindlewhorl of blackish pottery, carefully turned j 
or ground and with edges neatly rounded off'. 

Spindlewhorl of grey pottery, chipped into shape. This is a 
particularly interesting whorl, as the process of boring the hole 
was begun but never finished ; it is countersunk on both sides and 
is almost but not quite through. Diameter, 2in. 

Six Disks of pottery resembling spindlewhorls, but without holes j 
Diameter of largest, 3fin., of smallest, about fin. General Pitt- ' 
Bivers thought that similar disks might have been used in some 
kind of game. Might they not possibly be unfinished whorls ? 

Part of a base of a pot of brownish ware ; there is a hole through 
the centre, but the edges are not chipped off; it is perhaps, there- ' 
fore only a fragment of a vessel with a hole in the bottom and not| 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 137 

a whorl. General Pitt-Rivers found a large number of pots with 
holes bored through the bottoms in the Romano-British villages. 
He suggests that they may have been used for straining honey. 
(Excavations, II., p. 59.) It seems not improbable that the bases 
of these perforated pots were sometimes chosen for use as whorls 
as having holes already in them. 

Fragment of a strainer of grey pottery, pierced with many small 
irregular holes. (PL III., H.). 

Half of a cube-shaped object of fine red pottery ; it had a central 
hole through it and is well moulded. About l^in. square. Of 
unknown use (?) a weight or whorl. (PL III., E.). 

Long thin hollow bone pipe, trimmed and squared, from the leg 
bone of a large bird. Length, 6|in. (PL I.). (A similarly shaped 
bone, but with holes cut in it, is in the British Museum and is 
described as a flute. Is this an unfinished one ? ). 

The tip of a Stag's Horn Tine which has been made into a rough 
spoon or scoop with hatched lines round the edge of the bowl, now 
broken off. Length, 2Jin. (PL III., C). 

Leg bone of sheep with hole bored through it not quite in the 
middle of its length, there is no longitudinal hole (PL III., B). 
General Pitt-Rivers suggested that these bones with holes in them 
may have been used for winding string on, or as bobbins (Excava- 
tions, I., 175, and II., 172) It seems not impossible that they 
were used as handles for instruments made on the same lines as 
the bolas or bola. I have seen boys whose childhood was spent in 
South America bore similar holes in the leg bones of sheep and 
use them for handles of their bolas. The cord is put through the 
hole and knotted to form a stop. The edges of the holes are worn 
in the specimen from Oare. A precisely similar object is in the 
British Museum from the Glastonbury ;Lake Village found in 
association with combs with "T -shaped handles and other Late 
Celtic objects. 

Pointed Scoop, made out of the leg bone of a sheep, sliced off 
(PL III., A.) 

Piece of bone, one end cut to a "["-shape, the other broken. The 
handle of a weaving comb. Length, 3 in. (PL III., D). Combs 



138 Notes on a Late Celtic Rubbish Heap, near Oare. 

of this type are characteristic of Late Celtic sites. Examples from 
Glastonbury Lake Village are in the British Museum. 

Part of an antler of red deer, sawn off at both ends, scraped and 
polished. It has three deepish double saw cuts, two at one end, 
one at the other, cut transversely across the horn. There are 
scratches or slight cuts on the surface, especially on either side of 
the sawcuts. Length, 4| in. (PL III., E). 

Several apparently similar instruments have been found at 
Glastonbury Lake Village, but these seem to be generally per- 
forated as well as notched. It is suggested that some of these 
served as cheek pieces of bridles, while others may have been used 
in weaving in some unexplained way. Two examples are made 
of the upper portions of the tibias of horses. Proc. Somerset Arch. 
Society, LI., Pig. H 299, B 381-2. This example, however, may 
be merely an unfinished handle for a knife or similar instrument. 

Pive water-worn pebbles that have been used for rubbing or 
polishing. 

A piece of stalactite. 

A flat piece of red grained sandstone, much worn down on one 
side where it has perhaps been used as a whetstone. 

Piece of fine-grained water-worn stone used as a whetstone. 

Several fragments of much worn quern stones, from at least 
three querns. 

Pragments of bricks or tiles, some of which have rounded edges. 

Fragments of a very hard coarse cement or concrete, smoothed 
on one side and about \\m. thick. These may be fragments of 
flooring. 

Fragments of iron slag. An analysis of one piece gave the 
following result:— Silica=60-0 %, oxide of iron— 34'80 %, 
(=iron 24-36 %) Calcium oxide=T60 7o, Manganese oxide= 
traces ; Magnesia=0-108 °/ . 

No coins of any kind were found. 

There were a great number of bones of animals, nearly all in 
a very fragmentary condition. There were roughly, 75 % 
sheep, 20 7° pig, and 5 % ox. Those of the horse were exceptional. 

Professor Edward Fawcett, of University College, Bristol, very 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 139 

kindly identified bones of the following animals : — Horse, Ox {Bos 
longifrons), Sheep, Pig, and those (only two) of a small carnivore, 
perhaps a terrier. The bones of Horse, Ox, and Sheep are small 
in comparison with modern breeds. 



By kind permission of Mr. Eogers, of Eainscombe, the pottery 
and other relics have been placed in the Museum at Devizes. A 
small collection of typical pieces of the pottery has also been placed 
in the schoolroom at Oare. 



[Though much nearer to Oare, both Martinsell Camp and Withy 
Copse are actually in the parish of Pewsey.] 



140 



NOTES. 

Blue Headed Wagtail. " A pair of this species was discovered 
in the Manton water meadows, where they nested and successfully 
reared their young, the observer (G. Dent, of Marlborough College) 
watching them daily throughout the process. The distinguishing 
characters of this probably overlooked species were carefully noted and 
compared with those of the yellow wagtail, of which a pair subsequently 
nested in the same meadow. Full particulars of this interesting ob- 
servation were published in ' Bird Life.' " 

Marlborough Coll. Nat. Hist. Soc. Report for 1907, p. 76. 

White-Tailed Eagle shot at Mar den On the evening of 

February 24th, just before sunset, J. Alexander, keeper to Mr. J. W. 
Kingston, of Marden Manor, saw a large bird fly out of some firs on Mr. 
Cooper's farm on Marden Down, shot it, and found it was an Eagle 
measuring 7ft. 2in. from tip to tip of the extended wings and weighing 
131bs. The bird was accused of having killed two lambs. It was re- 
ported in all the local papers, Marlborough Times, March 6th, Devizes 
Gazette, March 15th, as a Golden Eagle, as these wandering Eagles 
almost invariably are — whereas in this case, as in probably almost every 
case of the occurrence of Eagles in the southern counties, the bird is not 
the Golden Eagle, but theWhite-Tailed or Sea Eagle,iZa^'«?etes albicilla. 
The bird killed at Littlecote in 1847, the magnificent specimen preserved 
at Charlton Park, killed in 1841, another shot in Savernake Forest in 1859, 
and the example recently killed at Groveley were all of this species. 
The Rev. A. C. Smith {Birds of Wilts, p. 60) was unable to record any 
example or occurrence of the Golden Eagle in the county of Wilts, and 
was strongly of opinion that it had not been correctly recorded from 
neighbouring counties where it is said to have been shot. The Golden 
Eagle in fact seldom leaves its home in the Highlands, where it is now 
happily fairly abundant, whereas the White-Tailed Eagle is a great 
wanderer. I am indebted to Messrs. Eowland Ward, who are preserving 
the bird, for an authoritative statement as to its species. 

Ed. H. Goddaed. 

Red- Throated Diver at Wy ly e . At the beginning of February, 
1909, a railway ganger at Wylye found a bird lying injured on the 
line, probably from flying against the telegraph wires. He killed it, and 
it was taken to the Rev. G. R. Hadow, who sent it for preservation to 
Mr. White, of Salisbury, by whom it was pronounced to be a Red-Throated 
Diver. It is now in Mr. Hadow's possession. Three specimens only of 
this bird are recorded for Wiltshire by the Rev. A. C. Smith, from 
Lyneham, Erlestoke, and Knoyle Down. 



Notes. 141 

Wylye Church Candelabra, in Mr. Pon ting's notes on this 

Church, W. A. M., xxxv., 380, it is stated that "There are three 
fine brass candelabra of twelve lights each without inscription." The 
Eector, the Kev. G. R. Hadow, writes that this is not accurate. Two of 
the candelabra only are old, and on one there is this inscription "The 
Gift of Tho. Mease, A.D. 1814." They were originally in old Wilton 
Church and came here when the pulpit did. The third is not old, but 
was given by Mr. Sidney Meade when Rector. 

" Prolusiones Historic^, The Hall of John Halle." 

As is well known only the first volume of this work by the Rev. Edward 
Duke was ever published. Amongst the books from Lake House, how- 
ever, which were sold at Salisbury on March 5th, 1908, were several 
sets of plates destined for the second volume. A set of these plates has 
been given to the Society's Library by Mr. J.J. Hammond, who, however, 
ascertained from the late Canon Rashleigh Duke on the occasion of the 
sale that this second volume was never written, and that no part of any 
MS. of it exists. 

Iron Object Of Unknown USe. With reference to the Iron 
Object with four spikes found at Oliver's Camp and illustrated W.A.M., 
xxxv., 431, Mr. A. D. Passmore writes (Feb. 23, 1909) that he has • 
obtained a precisely similar object in good condition from a pit on the 
downs. Mrs. B. H. Cunnington also writes (Feb. 25th, 1909) : " Several 
of them were found in a well with other Roman things in the Roman 
fort on the Bar Hill, Dumbartonshire. Similar objects have also been 
found at Pompeii, Epinay in France, and on one of the forts on the 
German Limes. There is one in the Guildhall Museum. They are strips 
of iron rivetted or joined in the centre in the form of the letter X , but 
the Oliver's Camp example is rather bent. It seems they are thought to 
have been attached to window frames to keep the panes of glass in place, 
but one German authority thinks they were door fittings. See Proe. 
Soc. Ant. Scot., XL., 513, fig. 39 No. 9. 

Against this idea of their use is to be set the fact that Mr. Passmore's 
example has the points regularly curved into a cup shape, as though they 
were intended to hold or contain something, and this was more or less 
the case also with the Oliver's Camp example, though that was bent out 
of shape. Ed. H. Goddaed. 

Intaglio at Teffont Magna. It may be worth noting that a 
small intaglio on cornelian picked up in the allotment at Teffont Magna 
in the spring of 1909, and believed to be Roman, was pronounced by the 
British Museum authorities to be an eighteenth century head of 
Shakspeare. C. V. Goddaed. 

Bronze Knife Dagger. A small bronze knife dagger found casually 
among road flints at Rockley, doubtless from the downs near, is illus- 
trated in Man, March, 1909, pp. 39, 40, in a note by the Rev. H. G. O. 
Kendall on " Remarkable Arrowheads and Diminutive Bronze 



142 Notes. 

Implement." The arrowheads which are illustrated are Dorset specimens 
in the possession of Mr.H. J. G. Hole, who also owns the knife dagger. This 
is an unusually small blade, flat, with two large rivet holes, the sides 
worn concave with use, the point very narrow and broken off. It weighs 
just over Joz. and measures lg in. X lin. 

Papal Bulla found at Swindon, A well-preserved leaden bulla 
of Pope Innocent VI., who reigned from 1352 to 1362, found recently at 
Swindon, is in the collection of Mr. A. D. Passmore. On the obverse it 
bears the heads of SS. Paul and Peter with the inscription SPASPE = 
S{anctus) T?a.(ulus) S(anctus) Pe(trus). On the reverse it bears the in- 
scription INNOCETIUS PP VI. For similar bulla of Boniface VIII. 
found at Warminster see Wilts Arch. Mag., xvii., 44. 

Teffoilt EviaS In making trenches for a water pipe at the farm and 
cottages west of Teffont quarry last winter (1908) the contractor says that 
two or three distinct coffins were cut through. The boards were rotten, 
but showed the shape plainly when the soil fell away from them : he was 
not sure if bones were found, as the interments were near the surface, 
with rock beneath : but he noticed some worked flints. I visited the 
place but failed to see anything. Burials have been found near by before, 
as noted in the last Magazine. C. V. Goddaed. 

Lord Clarendon and his Trowbridge Ancestry, a 

paper under this title is published in Wilts Arch. Mag., ix., 282—290. 
The family of Langford was connected with Trowbridge from the earliest 
times. In 1544 Alexander Langford senior, and Alexander Langford, 
junior, purchase two water mills, no doubt for clothmaking purposes. 
In his will, dated 1552, Edward Langford, clothier, speaks of his cousins, 
William Horton, of Iford, and Harrie Long of Trowbridge, both well 
known clothiers. In 1565 Alexander Langford is rated at £22. Now 
Leland, in 1540, in his Itinerary, Wilts Arch. Mag., vol. i., p. 151, 
writing about Trowbridge, says : — " One Alexandre is now a great clothier 
in the town." My suggestion is that Leland has given the Christian 
name and omitted the surname. We hear of no clothiers named 
Alexander, but we do know that Alexander Langford was a wealthy 
clothier, and that the Christian name was as common in the family as 
Anthony in that of the family of Bogers. F. Harrison. 

Marlborough Tokens. Mr. J. W. Brooke notes two unpublished 
seventeenth century Marlborough Tokens now in his collection : — 
WILL : CRABB . GROCER=Grocers' arms. 
IN MALBOROVGH 1664 = C.W.M. 

SIMON PIRE OF = Grocers' Arms. 
MARLEBOROUGH 1667. P.S.A. 
Found in Marlborough, July, 1908. 

Cross Base from Winterbourne Stoke Down, Many 

years ago, I think in the thirties or early forties, when a piece of down 



Notes. 143 

at the eastern, or to be more accurate, north-eastern, end of Winterbourne 
Stoke, between the Devizes Eoad and Fargo Plantation was broken up 
into arable land there was removed from about the middle of the field 
to the side of the highway, where it now is, the base of a cross. Whether 
before or after its removal I know not, but evidently, at some time the 
shaft or what then remained of it, was taken away a mile or so further 
northwards up the road and used to mark a grave at the cross road, where 
the track from Shrewton and Kollestone (for the boundaries of these 
parishes runs down its centre) to Netheravon crosses the Devizes Road. 
The stone being " rather in the way," was removed to a point some 
40 yards eastwards on to the down, which now belongs to the Army 
Council. I do not know and have never been able to ascertain, whose 
grave this was, but it is traditionally the grave of the incumbent or curate 
of Kollestone, who hanged himself. I have for some time been trying 
to get the base of this cross removed to Winterbourne Stoke Churchyard 
for safe custody. 
Fargo Plantation was planted by the grandfather of a friend of mine. It 
is at the western boundary of Avebury, and was called " Fargo " because 
the carters said it was far to go. This may seem a doubtful derivation 
but I have every reason to believe it to be the true one. 

J. J. Hammond. 

Little Owl. An example was shot by a keeper near Avebury in 
November, 1907, and is now preserved in the Marlborough College 
Museum. 

Marlborough Coll. Nat. Hist. Soc. Report for 1907, p. 76. 

Little Bustard at Avebury. A male Little Bustard (Otistetrax) 
in summer dress was shot at Avebury April 26th, 1909, and was sent 
by Mr. F. Deakin, The Lodge, Avebury, to be set up by Mr. Lucas, 
of Devizes. The range of the Little Bustard is Southern Europe, 
Algeria, Tunis, Messopotamia and India. It is only an occasional visitant 
to Central or Northern Europe. Harting says that about forty occur- 
rences are on record in the British Isles. 

The chief point of interest in the capture of this bird is that it was shot 
in mid-April, whereas all the English records have occurred in the 
autumn or winter, unless we except — a specimen in summer plumage, 
in the British Museum, said to have been killed in Norfolk — as set forth 
in Gray's list (part iii.), and alluded to in The Zoologist, p. 2242. 

Mr. F. Deakin writes: — "The bird was shot on Weedon. There is a 
dew pond on the top of the hill, and the bird pitched within 200 yards 
of it. I was going round the sheep and heard a very peculiar noise over 
my head. On looking up I could see it was a rare bird. I turned my 
horse round and fetched my gun and I happened to meet the keeper, 
J. Buckingham, who looks after the game on this farm. The bird being 
very wild I asked him to take the gun and I rode round the brow of the 
hill and attracted its attention while the keeper crept up the hill and shot 
it at 62 yards off. " 

E. P. Knubley. 



144 Wilts Obituary. 

Neolithic Burial at DintOU. During the progress of the water- 
works at Dinton early in 1909, an interment of a crouched skeleton, 
apparently of Neolithic age, accompanied only by a few flint flakes and 
two small pieces of worked bone, was discovered just to the north of 
the ridge, north of the village of Dinton. It was excavated under the 
superintendence of the Rev. G. H. Engleheart, F.S.A. The skull was 
too much broken to be examined. There was no sign of any barrow 
covering the interment. E. H. Goddabd. 



WILTS OBITUAKY. 



Major Audiey Walter Washbourne Money- Kyrle, 

died Oct. 28th, 1908, aged 62. Buried at Much Marcle, Herefordshire. 
Second surviving son of Lt.-Col. J. E. Money-Kyrle, of Homme House, 
Much Marcle. Born at Homme House, Sept. 12th, 1846. Educated at 
Sandhurst, served in 55th and 19th Foot, Major, 2nd Batt., Yorkshire 
Eegt., 1886 — 89. He represented Calne on the County Council and was 
a J. P. for Wilts, Herefordshire, and Herts, and D.L. for Wilts and Here- 
fordshire. Married 1887, Florence C, eldest daughter of Horace Smith- 
Bosanquet, of Broxbornebury, Herts, who with one son and two daughters 
survives him. He was the owner of the Homme House Estate in 
Herefordshire, as well as that at Whetham, near Calne. He died 
suddenly whilst out shooting, when staying with his brother, the Vicar 
of Much Marcle. He had resided at Whetham only during the last seven 
years, having carried out considerable alterations and additions to the 
house and gardens. A strong Conservative, an Evangelical Churchman 
whose religion was the rule of his life, he had become known in spite of 
the singular modesty and unobstrusiveness of his character, as one who 
could be depended on to give not merely money but personal service in 
any good cause. He was greatly esteemed by all who knew him. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Times, Oct. 31st ; Devizes Gazette, Oct. 29th, 
1908. 

Thomas Harris, died November 30th, 1908, aged 89. Born 15th 
November, 1819. Son of John and Mary Harris. On the death of John 
Harris (who carried on a butcher's business in Calne which had been 
started by his father John), the business was carried on at first in the 
name of Mary Harris, and afterwards in that of the two sons, Charles 
and Thomas, now butchers and bacon factors. " Harris's Bacon," pro- 
duced by this firm and by that of their uncle Henry, began to be widely 
known. In 1856 Thomas Harris, now sole partner of his own business, 



Wilts Obituary. 145 

first began the use of ice in the curing of bacon, patented the process in 
1864, and the business increased enormously, and was carried on by him 
until in 1885 he took his three sons, J. M., Tom, and Herbert G., Harris 
into partnership and from that time gave up the management of the 
vast business to them. In 1886 the firm of his brother, " Messrs. Charles 
Harris & Co.," which had hitherto been carried on separately, was 
amalgamated, and the united Harris bacon curing business became that 
of " Charles and Thomas Harris & Co., Ltd." Long before this the staple 
product of Calne had become known all over the world. 

He married, first, 1852, Susan, d. of Mr. Eeynolds, of Somerford, who 
died in 1853 ; secondly, in 1855, Sophia, d. of John Mitchell of Sheldon, 
by whom he had three sons and a daughter ; she died in 1864, and he 
married for his third wife Elizabeth, d. of William Colebrooke, of Gt. 
Tangley Manor Farm, Guildford, by whom he had three sons and four 
daughters. His widow, five sons — J. M. Harris and H. G. Harris, of 
Calne, Dr. Harris of Shaftesbury, A. C. Harris, of Leicester, and Joseph 
Harris, of British Columbia, survive him, together with two daughters — 
Sophia, and Dr. Bessie Gillison, now working for the London Missionary 
Society in China. A third daughter, Mary, also a missionary in China, 
died in 1895. 

He was Mayor of Calne in 1859, 67, 78, 85, and 89, and was a member 
of the Town Council from 1854 to 1895, a member of the County Council 
1888 — 1898, and J.P. for Wilts,1890. He took a very prominent place in 
the life of Calne, and the town owes a great deal to his wise generosity. 
The railway to Calne was largely due to the Harris family. He gave 
£1000 to found a charity for gifts of coal to the poor and £1756 and the 
site towards the New Town Hall. He presented the new roadway of 
" Ivy Walk " to the town, and in 1891 he made a free gift of the new 
Recreation Ground with pavilion, caretaker's lodge, and cycling track 
complete. He was also a generous supporter of the Free Library, and 
of many other local institutions. He was a strong Liberal and a' 
staunch teetotaller, being President of the N. Wilts Liberal Association 
and of the Western Temperance League. 

A sincerely religious man, the " Free Church " of Calne, founded largely 
by the Harris family, when with others, they seceded from the Parish 
Church in 1866 on the appointment of the late Canon Duncan as Vicar, 
and the' Nonconformist cause in the neighbourhood will lose in him one 
of their most generous supporters, and the town of Calne its best 
known and perhaps most respected citizen. 

Long obit, notice, with sketch of the history of the firm and its business 
and an " Appreciation," containing some account of his brothers as well 
as himself, Devizes Gazette, Dec. 3rd and 10th ; another with portrait 
Wiltshire Times, Dec. 5th and 12th, 1908. 

His funeral, at the Nonconformist Cemetery, which he had helped to 
provide, was marked by the closing of all places of business in the town, 
and by the very large numbers who were present at the service and the 
cemetery. 

'i. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. L 



146 Wilts Obituary. 

Capt. Cyril Minshull Thornton, J P., died of Dysentery^ 

Northern Rhodesia, Sept. 9th, 1908, aged 38. He resided at Greenhill, 
Sutton Veney, and commanded the D, Swindon, Squadron of the Wilts 
Yeomanry. His popularity was shown by the large attendance at the 
Memorial Service held at Sutton Veney Church on Oct. 7th, reported 
with a portrait in Wiltshire Times, Oct. 10th, 1908. 

Rev. Matthew ShackletOn, died November 14th, 1908, aged 
71. Buried at Beechingstoke. S. of John Shackleton, Solicitor, of Leeds. 
Educated at Sedbergh Grammar School, and Clare Coll., Camb., B.A. 
1860; M.A. 1864. Deacon 1860; priest 1861 (Ely). Curate of Barton 
Mills, Cambs. 1861—63 ; Rector of St. Peter's, Thetford, Norf., 1863—68; 
Vicar of Branksea, Dorset, 1868 — 72; Wincanton, (Som.), 1872—84; 
Rector of Beechingstoke, 1884—1908, when he resigned. He leaves one 
son and three daughters. 

Obit notice, Devises Gazette, Nov. 19th, 1908. 

Solomon Andrews, died Nov. 9th, 1908, aged 73. Born at Trowbridge, 
of poor parents April 5th, 1835, he received little or no education. We at to 
Cardiff and beginning by selling " Brandysnaps " in the market, rose to 
be the " Whiteley of Wales," with streets of shops, and huge businesses 
in Cardiff and London, and valuable properties at Pwlheli, Glyn-y-Weddw 
and elsewhere in Wales. He married first Mary Asher, of Trowbridge, 
and secondly Miss Uddell, of Knighton, Radnor. 

Obit, notice, with portrait, Wiltshire Times, Nov. 14th, 1908. 

George Trimmer Smith, died October 22nd, 1908, aged 44. 
Buried at Devizes Cemetery. Son of George Smith, of Devizes, served 
his articles with Messrs. Marsh & Dawes, auctioneers. Started in business 
with a partner as Smith & Swayne, continued the business on his own 
account on death of his partner, and afterwards bought the goodwill of 

1 the business of Mr. F. Sloper in 1894. Well known as a Freemason, a 
member of the Town Council, and as an auctioneer and valuer at Devizes. 
Obit, notices, Wiltshire Advertiser, with portrait, Oct. 29th ; Devizes 
Gazette, Oct. 29th ; Wiltshire Times, Oct. 31st, 1908. 

The Hon. Duncombe Pleydell Bouverie, died Jan. 25th. 

1909, aged 66. Second son of the 4th Earl of Radnor. Born 1842. 
married 1883, Maria Eleanor, second d. of Sir Edward Hulse, 5th Bart., I 
who survives hirn. Served in the 55th Foot. D.L. and J. P. for Berks. 
He lived at Coleshill House, Berks. He leaves one son, Jacob Edward 1 
Pleydell Bouverie, and two daughters. 

Albert James Beaven, died Dec. 8th, aged 66, at The Elms. Holt. 
Buried at Holt. Born 1842 at Holt, son of Thomas Beaven, educated at, 
Taunton, served at sea in the Merchant Service, in Green's Transport,' 
Service, and in the East India Company's Service. On retiring he became! 
a partner in the firm of Messrs. Beaven, Woolstaplers and FellmongeiSi 
He had been for many years an Alderman of the County Council, ancj 
was Chairman of the Bradford District Council and Board of Guardian i 



Wilts Obituary. 147 

for a considerable period. J.P. for Wilts, 1907. He married first, Mary- 
Isabel, d. of Dr. Leeson, and secondly, Miss H. G. Birch, d. of Capt. Birch. 
A Liberal and Nonconformist, much respected. 

Obit, notices, Devizes Gazette, Dec. 10th ; Wiltshire Times, Dec. 12th. 

2reorge Edward Dartliell Died Dec. 17th, 1908, aged 56. 
Buried at Stratford-sub-Castle. Eldest son of Bev. B. W. Dartnell, late 
Bector of Huish, and Arabella Thring, d. of Bev. Ed. Goddard of Clyffe 
Pypard Manor. Educated at Marlborough Grammar School, 1864 ; 
Marlborough College, Feb. 1866. Entered the service of the Wilts and 
Dorset Bank at the. Weymouth branch, 1873. In the service of this 
bank, for the last fifteen years at Salisbury, he passed his life. Of late 
years he had suffered much from weak health, and had been obliged to a 
great extent to curtail his literary work. In former years the Editor of 
the Magazine owed much to his help in the preparation of the notices of 
" Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, and Articles," and he made two notable 
contributions to the pages of the Magazine himself in his articles on 
" Richard Jefferies," and, in conjunction with the Editor, the " Contri- 
butions towards- a Wiltshire G-J.ossary," which were afterwards published 
separately by the English Dialect Society as " A Glossary of Words 
used in the County of Wilts." He also did a great deal of work for the 
monumental "English Dialect Dictionary." Dialect was indeed one 
of his strong points. Living a very retired life he had an extraordinary 
knowledge of certain branches of English literature, more especially 
of modern poetry and fiction. Within these limits he read everything 
and he forgot nothing. He was himself a prolific writer of short poems, 
with a peculiar knack of felicitous translation from French and German 
originals. From 1881 — 1903, thirty-six of his poems and Translations 
were printed in the Journal of Education, and he won twenty-three 
prizes for them. From its beginning in 1906 he had been one of the 
Editors of the Wilts Sf Dorset Bank Annual. His memory^vas stored 
with information on all kinds of Wiltshire matters. 



Bibliographical List of his writings. 

1869 RUTH. College Rhymes contributed by Members of the Uni- 
versities of Oxford and Cambridge. Oxford, 1869. 
A poem, pp. 52 — 56, signed " Wadham College." This was 
reprinted from The Marlburian without the author's sanction. 

1871. A SONG OF CyEDMON AND OTHER POEMS, BY G. E. D. 
Oxford, Wheeler & Day : London, Hamilton & Co. Cloth. 
7in. x 4§in. pp. vi., including title + 72 ; 300 copies printed. 

1873. A CHILD'S SONG. Peoples' Magazine, March, 1873. Poem of 
eight stanzas, pp. 184, 185. 

LITTLE CHRISTINE, AN OLD MAN'S STORY. Peoples Magazine, 

November, 1873. A prose story. 

L 



148 Wilts Obituary. 

1875. ELLA'S LOCKET AND WHAT IT BROUGHT HER. London : 

Marcus "Ward & Co. Cloth., 6in. X 4|in., pp. 189, including 
title. Five coloured illustrations. A children's story in prose. 

THOUGHT AND AFTER-THOUGHT. The Churchman's Shilling 

Magazine, January, 1875, p. 536. Poem, three stanzas. 

MARJORIE's DAY. The Churchman' 1 s Shilling Magazine, pp. 

628, 629, February, 1875. A poem. 

1876. THE SNOWBALL, WORDS BY G. E. DARTNELL, MUSIC BY T. 

M. MORGAN, pp. 7, 8, of Neio Songs for Elementary Schools, 
edited by T. M. Morgan. Book II. London : Moffatt, Paige 
&Co. 

THE MILL. By the same. Ibid, pp. 11 — 13. Two soDgs. 

Pamphlet, 7in. X 4fin. 
1881. From 1881 to 1903 thirty-six Poems and Translations appeared 

in the Journal of Education. 
1885. FOR A CENOTAPH, Epitaph on p. 12 of In Memoriam Epitaph 

on G. G. Gordon. London : William Kice, 86, Fleet Street. 

1892. THE DREAM OF MAXEN. Journal of Education, April 1st, 

1892. This, perhaps the most important of his poems, was 
reprinted pp. 353 — 365 of Essays, Mock Essays, and Char- 
acter Sketches, reprinted from the Journal of Education. 
London : W. Bice. 1898. 
1891—1899. CONTRIBUTIONS TOWARDS A WILTSHIRE GLOSSARY 
BY G. E. DARTNELL AND THE REV. E. H. GODDARD. 
Wiltshire Archceological and Natural History Magazine, 
xxvi., 84—171 ; 293—314 ; xxvii., 124—159 ; xxx., 233-270. 

1893. RICHARD JEFFERIES. Wiltshire Archceological and Natural 

History Magazine, xxvii., 69 — 99, with a bibliographical list 
of his works. 
1893. WILTSHIRE WORDS. A GLOSSARY OF WORDS USED IN THE 
COUNTY OF WILTSHIRE, BY GEORGE EDWARD DARTNELL 
AND THE REV. EDWARD HUNGERFORD GODDARD, M.A. 
LONDON : PUBLISHED FOR THE ENGLISH DIALECT 
SOCIETY BY HENRY FROWDE, OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 
WAREHOUSE, AMEN CORNER, LONDON, E.C., 1893. PRICE 
FIFTEEN SHILLINGS NET. [ENGLISH DIALECT SOCIETY, 
SERIES C. ORIGINAL GLOSSARIES, NO. 69.] 
Paper covers, 8vo., pp. xix + 235. The greater part of the 
actual Glossary is composed of the material printed in Wilts 
Arch. Mag., xxvi, 84—169, 293—314 ; xxvii, 124—159, 
" Contributions towards a "Wiltshire Glossary," but the list is 
revised and much enlarged in this book. The preface 
mentions the authorities made use of ; the introduction 
contains a series of notes on pronunciation, etc. ; pp. 205 



Wilts Obituary. 149 

—216 contain Dialect Stories in prose and verse, pp, 217 — 

223 a Bibliography, and pp. 224 — 235 word lists from the 

Cunnington MS. and Monthly Magazine. 
1893 THE FIRST NOEL, A CAROL IN THE OLD STYLE. WORDS BY 

G. E. DARTNELL, SET TO MUSIC BY C. V. S. STANFORD, 

REPRINTED FROM THE JOURNAL OF EDUCATION, DEC. 1, 

1893. 
1897. DUNSTABLE SCHOOL SONG. WORDS BY G. E. DARTNELL, 

MUSIC BY F. GOSTELOW, A.R.A.M., F.C.O. 4to., pp. 4. Six 

stanzas. 

1905. RICHARD JEFFERIES. Wilts and Dorset Bank Annual. 
Salisbury, Christmas, 1905. This is largely a shortened 
reprint of the article printed in Wilts Arch. Mag in 
1893. See above. 

1906. WILTSHIRE MEMORIES. Wilts and Dorset Bank Annual 
Christmas, 1906, pp. 8 — 17, Eeminiscences of N. Wilts. 

RORKES DRIFT, A BALLAD. Ibid, pp. 23-28. 

AMONG THE MOONRAKERS. Ibid, pp. 62—71. 

NOTES ON LONGFELLOW'S POEMS. Ibid, pp. 74—89. 

1907. ONCE UPON A TIME. Wilts and Dorset Bank Annual, 
Christmas, 1907, pp. 59—68, Stories of N. Wilts. 

MANZELLE FIFINE. Ibid, pp. 32, 33, a poem. 

1909. A BATTLE HYMN. Wilts and Dorset Bank Annual, 1908, 
pp. 10—12. 

GUYFAWKESASAHERO. Ibid, pp. 92— 116. A prose story. 

eorge Blake, of the Bed House, Amesbury. Died March 6th, 1909, 
aged 59. Buried at Amesbury. Third s. of Alfred Blake of Codford. 
Born at Steeple Ashton, educated at Trowbridge Grammar School. 
Occupied a large farm at Chitterne and superintended two others, 4000 
acres in all at Chitterne, for many years. From Chitterne he removed 
to Amesbury, where he was known as a breeder of Hampshire Down 
Sheep. He was also agent of the Amesbury Estate, and for many years 
acted extensively as a land valuer and estate agent. He represented 
Amesbury on the County Council from the time of the formation of the 
Council until his death and took a prominent part in the business and 
debates. He was chairman of the Amesbury District Council. His 
widow, two sons, and a daughter survive him. He was well known 
as a man of wide knowledge and experience on all matters affecting land 
and agricultural life in S. Wiltshire, and his knowledge was always 
at the service of the county in the various public offices he filled so 
efficiently. 

He had been chairman of the S. Wilts Chamber of Commerce, and 
was on the Council of The Boyal Agricultural Society. 

Obit, notices, Salisbury Journal, March 13th; Wiltshire Times, March 
13th, 1909. 



150 Wilts Obituary. 

John Ambrose, M.D., Lt.-Col., B.A.M.C., retired. Died suddenly, 
February 27th, 1909, aged 67. Buried at Devizes Cemetery. Son of 
Dr. Ambrose, born at Newcastle "West, Co. Limerick, June 3rd, 1841. 
Educated Queen's Coll., Cork. B. A. Dublin, 1861. Diploma as Surgeon, 
Boyal Coll. of Surgeons, Edinburgh, 1862. M.D., Dublin, 1863. Surgeon 
to 58th Begiment 1864 — 1884, when he came to Devizes as Surgeon to 
the troops at the Barracks. Married 1871, Katherine Emily, d. of Gen. 
Sir W. M. S. Mc Murdo, G.C.B., who survives him. He leaves two 
sons, one of whom, Charles, is well known as an artist on the Pictorial 
Press, and one daughter, Theresa, married to Mr. J. T. Jackson, Town 
Clerk of Devizes. He was well known as a doctor in Devizes and the 
neighbourhood. 

Obit, notices, Devizes Gazette, March 4th; Wiltshire Advertiser, 
March 4th, 1909. 

]Rev. Storer Marshall Lakin. Died April, 1909, aged 83. 

Buried in the Cloisters, Salisbury Cathedral. S.S. Coll., Camb., B.A., 
1859; M.A., 1862. Deacon 1851, Priest 1852, London. Tutor of St. 
Mark's Coll., Chelsea, 1850 — 54; Priest Vicar of Salisbury Cathedral, 
1856—97 ; Vicar of the Close, 1879—1889 ; Suceentor, 1879 until his 
death. As Librarian of the Cathedral Library he published an excellent 
Catalogue of Printed Books in the Library of Salisbury Cathedral in 
1880. 

Obit notice, Guardian, April 14th, Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, May, 
1909. 

Capt. Peter Audley David Arthur Lovell, of Cole Park, j 

near Malmesbury. Died April 24th, 1909, aged 50. Only son of Peter 
Audley Lovell, J.P., and D.L., for Wilts, who died 1869. Born 1857 
married, 1890, Bosalind third d. of Francis Lovell, of Hinchelsea, Hants. 
J. P. Wilts and Montgomeryshire. Captain in Coldstream Guards,' 
1889 — 95, when he retired. He leaves no issue and is the last of his 
family. 

Rev Thomas James Heard, died April 29th, 1909, Wore. Coll., 
Oxon, B.A., 1853; M.A., 1856. Deacon 1854, Priest 1855, Bath and| 
Wells. Curate of St. James', Taunton, 1854—56; Beedon, 1856-73; 
Bector of Sherrington 1873 until his death. 

Obit, notice, Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, June, 1909. 

Charles Henry LOWe. Died April llth, 1909, aged 81. Buried ai 
Bowde. S. of Balph Lowe, of Liverpool. Born at Gibraltar April IStliJ 
1828. Began his mercantile career in the firm of Phipps, Bros., & Co. 
Brazilian merchants, Bio de Janeiro. He afterwards became resideiv' 
partner of the firm at Bio. He retired comparatively early in life am 
about 1886 settled down at Bowde Hall, living a quiet retired life then, 
in the summer and wintering at Bordighera, Italy. He filled no publij 
posts and took no part in public life in the county. He was nevel 
married. A devoted churchman, he gave lavishly to Church and philar 



Wilts Obituary. 151 

thropic objects. He was for twenty years churchwarden of All Saints' 
Church, Bordighera, and was in some sense the father of the English 
colony of that place, having given some £'5000 towards the building of 
the Church, the Parsonage and other institutions in connection with it. 
In the Devizes neighbourhood, too, he was known as a most generous 
supporter of all Church work. St. John's Church, Devizes, and the 
Church at Kowde show many proofs of his generosity. The Devizes 
Literary and Scientific Institution owes its present position to large gifts 
from him. 

Long obit, notice, Devizes Gazette, Ap. loth; Salisbury Diocesan 
Gazette, May, 1909. 

feev. William de Quetteville. Died April 30th, 1909. Of 

Noirmont Manor, St. Aubyn's, Jersey. B.A. Oxon, 1852, M.A. 1854, 
Deacon 1853, Oxon ; Priest 1854, Winchester. Fellow of Pemb. Coll., 
Oxon. Bector of Brinkworth, 1861 — 95. 

Captain Ambrose John Awdry. Died of enteric fever at 

Barrakpore, India, May 10th, 1909, aged 30. Second son of Charles 
Awdry, of Lavington Manor. Born 22nd March, 1879. Educated at 
Winchester, 1892—97. B.M.A. Woolwich; 2nd Lieut., B.A., 1898; 
Lieut., R.H.A., 1901 ; Capt., R.F.A., 1905. Served in the South African 
War, 1900 — 1902, and afterwards in India. 

Obit, notice, Devizes Gazette, May 13th, 1909. 

Edward ChattOCk Lowndes, died May 13th, 1909, aged 75. 
Buried at Castle Combe. Born Dec. 6th 1833, eldest son of Ed. Chattock 
Lowndes (formerly Gorst). M.A. Cambridge. J. P. and D.L. for Wilts. 
High Sheriff 1874. Assumed the name of Lowndes 1853. He purchased 
the Castle Combe Estate on the death of Mr. George Poulett Scrope in 
1866. He never married and is succeeded in the property by his brother, 
the Eight Hon. Sir John Gorst. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Advertiser, May 20th ; Wiltshire Times, May 
22nd, 1909. 



152 



RECENT WILTSHIRE BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, 
ARTICLES, &c. 



[N.B. — This list does not claim to be in any way exhaustive. The Editor 
appeals to all authors and publishers of pamphlets, books, or views in any 
way connected with the county to send him copies of their works, and to 
editors of papers and members of the Society generally to send him copies 
of articles, views, or portraits, appearing in the newspapers.] 



Sir Christopher Wren. By Lena Milman. London: 

Duckworth and Co. New York : Charles Scribners Sons. 1908. 

Cloth, 8in. X 5|in., pp. xvi. + 367. 70 illustrations. Price 7/6 net. 

" The precise date of Christopher Wren's birth is a matter of dispute 
(says the authoress), but most authorities agree in setting aside his 
baptismal entry (dated 1631) as inaccurate, and accepting October 20th, 
1632, as the day on which a second son was born to Christopher Wren, 
Hector of East Knoyle. Two years earlier in the Register another son's 
birth is recorded, but since to both alike there was given their father's 
name in baptism, it would seem certain that the elder died in infancy." 
On the translation of his uncle, Matthew Wren, from the See of 
Norwich to that of Ely, and his resignation of the Deanery of Windsor 
and the Registrarship of the Garter, both these offices were conferred 
upon his father, who continued to hold the Rectory of East Knoyle 
together with that of Great Haseley in Oxfordshire. The career of 
" that miracle of a youth," as John Evelyn calls him, at Westminster 
School, at Wadham College, Oxford, as Fellow of All Souls, and 
Professor of Astronomy at Gresham College, London, at the age of 24, 
and Savillian Professor of Astronomy at Oxford in 1661, is followed with 
just sufficient detail to show the way in which he was regarded by his 
contemporaries as a kind of universal genius in almost every branch of 
knowledge, except architecture. This he seems never to have touched 
until in 1662 the King, apparently on the recommendation of Evelyn, 
appointed him " Assistant to the Surveyor-General," expressly in order 
that he might carry out the two important works of repairing St. Paul's 
and Windsor Castle. All this is told in the first sixty-eight pages of the 
book, and then the authoress settles down to the main purpose of her work 
— the sympathetic setting forth, with excellent illustrations, and most 
understanding criticism, of all the main architectural works accomplished 
by her hero, from his first work in the doorway in the north transept 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 153 

of Ely Cathedral in 1663, to his last, the Orangery at Kensington, 
finished in 1706. There are a number of appendices containing a 
chronological list of his architectural works, and many interesting 
letters and reports, including his " Report on Salisbury Cathedral, 
1669." "The whole pile," he says, " is large and magnificent, and may 
be justly accounted one of the best patterns of architecture in that age 
wherein it was built." There is also printed here the " Memorial from 
Sir Christopher Wren to the Bishop of Eochester concerning the Abbey 
Church of St. Peter at Westminster, 1713," as well as a genealogy of 
the family of Wren. Altogether a book worthy of its subject. 
Reviewed Times, Sept. 10th; Antiquary, Dec, 1908. 

The Annals of the Yeomanry Cavalry of Wiltshire, 
Vol. II, being a complete history of the Prince 
of Wales' Own Royal Regiment from 1893 to 

1908, by Henry Graham. Devizes, Geo. Simpson, " Gazette" 
Printing Works, 1908. 

Blue Cloth, 8|in. x 5jin., pp. vii. + 192, Price 6s. Portraits of Col. G. 
T. J. Sotheron Estcourt : Col. W. H. Long ; and Col. the 5th Marquis of 
Bath. Illustration of the Memorial Tablet to the officers and men of the 
Wiltshire Corps who died during the war in S. Africa, and sketch maps 
of the three campaigns in which they were engaged. Appendices of 
Lists of the Officers and Regimental Prize Winners, 1885 — 1907 ; and a 
statement of accounts and expenses of raising the three Companies for S. 
Africa. 

The Author published at Liverpool in 1894 a thin " Vol. II." con- 
taining the Annals of the Regiment " from 1884 to 1893," consisting of 
forty-five pages. The present volume, also called "Vol II.," carries 
down to the present time the history of what was officially recognised in 
1885 as the Senior Regiment of Yeomany Cavalry in the Service. It 
follows the fortunes of the Regiment year by year, its Centenary and 
inspection by the Prince of Wales in 1893, down to the outbreak of the war 
in South Africa. The raising of the three Wiltshire Companies of Imperial 
Yeomanry and their experiences in South Africa in the campaigns against 
Prinsloo, Olivier, and De Wet, are naturally dwelt upon at considerable 
length, and the account here given of the different campaigns in which 
they took part and of the work done by them is the most interesting part 
of the book for the general reader. Another important landmark in 
the history of the Regiment was the provision, as premier Regiment of 
Yeomanry, of the representative detachment of that branch of the Service 
under Major F. P. Goddard, to accompany the " Imperial Representative 
Corps " sent to Australia to attend the Proclamation of the Common- 
wealth, on January 1st, 1901. The full Rolls of the officers and men of 
the three Companies serving in the South African war are given. 
Altogether the annals seem very complete without being unduly prolix. 

Noticed, Salisbury Journal, Nov. 28th, 1908. 



154 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

Grafton Chimes, or " When I was a Boy," by w. Mau- 
rice Adams. London : Henry J. Drane, Limited, Danegeld House, 82a, 
Farringdon Street, E.C. [January, 1909]. 
Cloth, 7fin. X 5iin., pp. viii., + 134. 

The author, who has written several other little books on Savernake 
and its neighbourhood, in this volume sings the praises of his native 
place. It is a simple kindly story of early recollections told in detail in 
old-fashioned rhyme, in which East Grafton and the neighbourhood and 
its then inhabitants are freely mentioned. 

A Genealogical Account of the Mayo and Elton 
Families of Wilts and Herefordshire and some 
other adjoining Counties, together with num- 
erous Biographical Sketches. To which are added many 
genealogies, for the most part not hitherto published, of Families allied by 
marriage to the Family of Mayo, and a History of the Manors of Andrews 
and Le Mote, in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire. By Charles Herbert Mayo, 
M.A., Lincoln College, Oxford ; Vicar of Long Burton with Holnest, 
Dorset ; Rural Dean and non-residentiary Canon of Sarurn. Second and 
greatly enlarged edition, with many illustrations. London : privately 
printed at the Chiswick Press, by Charles Whittingham and Company. 
MCMVIII. All Rights Reserved. 

Cloth, ll^in. x 9in., pp. xxi + 628. Forty full-page plates and eight 
illustrations in text. Price to subscribers, £2 2s. net. Two hundred 
and fifty copies printed. [The first edition, privately printed in 1882, 
contained viii. + 177 pp. only, and only the illustrations in the text. 
The forty plates have all been added]. 

This sumptuous volume, printed and illustrated in the best possible 
way, contains an immense amount of information concerning the 
families of which it treats, and apparently no trouble or expense has been 
spared to render the record as far as possible accurate and complete. It 
contains chapters more especially connected with Wiltshire on " Mayo and 
May of "Wiltshire and several adjoining counties": "John Mayo of Devizes, 
and the descendants of his eldest son, John Mayo, Vicar of Avebury, 
1712 — 1746, with notices of three younger sons " ; " James Mayo, Vicar 
of Avebury, 1789 — 1822, and his descendants to the present day " ; 
"William Mayo, Vicar of Wootton Rivers " ; "An account of certain 
families which have intermarried with John Mayo, of Devizes, and his 
descendants." There are portraits of James Mayo, Vicar of Avebury and 
his wife Jane, their daughters, Jane and Barbara, Charles Mayo, Rector 
of Huish and Beechingstoke, 1750 — 1829, and a small illustration of 
Avebury Church before the addition of a vestry. There are forty-nine 
genealogies of families allied by marriage with that of Mayo. Altogether 
a notable family history. 

The Life of Sir Isaac Pitman (Inventor of Phono- 
graphy) . By Alfred Baker. London : Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, 
Ltd., No. 1, Amen Corner, E.C, 1908. 






Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 155 

Green cloth, 8Jin. X 5Jin., pp. xi. + 392 ; 37 plates and 8 illustrations 
in text. The former include a portrait of his father, Samuel Pitman, of 
Trowbridge, and 5 portraits of himself, at 32 (painted by J. B. Keene) ; 
at 46, and 55 (photos); the marble bust by T. Brock ; and the posthumous 
portrait by A. S. Cope, now in the National Portrait Gallery. There 
are also a photographic group of " Isaac Pitman & Sons," and views of 
" St. James' Church, Trowbridge," " School attended by Isaac Pitman at 
Trowbridge," and " Kingston House, Bradford-on-Avon." His various 
residences and Phonetic Institutes at Bath and elsewhere are also 
illustrated. 

" The Life Story of Sir Isaac Pitman has been related in many forms, 
but not hitherto with the completeness which has been attempted in the 
present volume . . . The ' Biography of Isaac Pitman,' written by 
Mr. T. A. Eeed in 1890 . . . has of necessity been freely drawn on." 
So says the author in his preface. This is in short the " official " 
biography of one who "in the directions of stenography and phonetic 
spelling must be reckoned amongst those who have exercised an unusually 
great and happy influence upon their race." "Isaac Pitman's achieve- 
ment is unique, its success has been phenomenal. The majority of the 
systems of English shorthand have passed into oblivion, or are practised 
by a few, while the method of writing for which the world is indebted to 
his genius has come into universal use." 

As Sir Isaac devoted his long life and his amazing industry and 
perseverance, practically to two objects : Phonography in which he 
attained such a remarkable success, and " Spelling Reform," in which 
happily his failure was equally complete, it is only natural that the great 
bulk of the " Life " should be taken up with the technicalities of these 
subjects which curiously enough he seems himself to have regarded as 
of almost equal importance. In fact a great part.of the book is practically 
a history of the evolution of shorthand as at present practised, and of the 
untiring efforts of its inventor to induce an unsympathetic world to embark 
on a phonetic system of spelling which would have made every book 
already printed in the English language unreadable to the next generation. 
The appendices contain a reprint of " Stenographic Sound-hand," 
published in 1837 (pp. 333 — 348) ; a note on " The Evolution of Phono- 
graphy " ; and a very valuable " Bibliography " of his Works, which are 
divided into five classes, Shorthand Works, Books in Shorthand character, 
Periodicals, Spelling Reform Tracts, and Books in Reformed Spelling, 
occupying pp. 355 — 379 of small print, a truly astonishing life's work ! 

Long notice, with cut of the School in the Parish Churchyard, Wiltshire 
Times, Jan. 2nd ; notice and portraits, &c, Illust. Lond. iV 7 ew*,May 8th, 
1909. 

Reviewed, Spectator, Jan. 30th; Guardian, Feb. 24th, 1909. 

Gleanings of the Robins or Robbins Family of 

England, with lithograph of armorial window and other engravings. 
By the Rev. Mills Robbins, Holy Trinity Vicarage, West Chobham, 



156 Eecent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

Surrey. Devizes : C. H. Woodward, Machine Printer, 4, St. John 
Street. 1908. For private circulation only. 

Eed cloth, 8Jin. x 5|in., pp. 114. Four illustrations, including *' The 
Old Manor House, Woodborough " and " Woodborough Church in 1861." 
Four folding pedigrees, including " Bobbins of Wilcote and Wood- 
borough " and " Bobbins of Bulford." 

This is really a second edition, with some additional matter, of the 
" Gleanings of the Bobbins Family," issued by the author in 1880. It con- 
sists of a number of notes of references to persons of the name of Bobin or 
Bobins in Jersey, Matson, Clay Hill, and Charlton Kings in Gloucester- 
shire, and twenty-six other counties, including Wiltshire, where they 
appear at Wootton Bassett, Mere, Salisbury, Ashton Keynes, Broken- 
borough, Malmesbury, Melksham, and more especially at Wilcote, 
Woodborough, Alton Barnes, Alton Priors and Marden. The book is 
dedicated to the memory of "my uncle Samuel Robbins, founder of 
Honeystreet, Woodborough, maker of the road from Kennett to Ames- 
bury, and in other ways a public benefactor to the County of Wilts. 
Died November 27th, 1869, aged 82 years." 

Wiltshire Parish Registers, Marriages Edited by W. 

P. W. Phillimore, M.A., B.C.L., and John Sadler. Vol. VII. London : 
Issued to the subscribers by Phillimore & Co., 124, Chancery Lane. 
1908. 

8vo., cloth, pp. vi. + one page of Contents and one of " Corrigendum," 
+ 147. 

This volume contains the marriage registers, up to 1812, of Salisbury 
Cathedral. Cholderton, Purton, Charlton near Pewsey, and Huish. 

Richard Jefferies, His Life and Work. By Edward 

Thomas, Author of " Horse Solitariae," " The Heart of England," &c, 
with illustrations and a map. London: Hutchinson & Co., Paternoster 
Bow. 1909. 

Cloth, 9in. x 6in., pp. viii. including title, &c, -(- four pages un- 
numbered (Contents and list of illustrations) + 340. 

Thirteen illustrations, including three portraits of R. Jefferies, "As a 
Boy," "As a Young Man," with an excellent frontispiece photograph 
of him in later life. The other illustrations are " Forest and Down," 
from a picture by J. Guthrie ; Old Swindon Church ; Coate Farm ; a 
facsimile of a letter ; a photograph of the " Venus Accroupie " ; two 
portraits each of James Luckett and Elizabeth Jefferies, Bichard's 
father and mother, and one of Fanny Jefferies, his grandmother. There 
is also a folding map of the district of North Wilts around Swindon. A 
valuable Bibliography, (1) of the writings of Bichard Jefferies, (2) of 
books and others writings relating to him, occupies pp. 329-355. This 
is fuller than any Bibliography that has appeared before. There is also 
a fairly full index. 

The author, in his preface, says : " This book is an attempt to give a 
fuller account of the life and writings of Bichard Jefferies than has yet 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 157 

been published. That " The Eulogy of Kichard Jefferies " by the late 
Walter Besant was kindly, but unsympathetic and incomplete, cannot 
be disputed. Mr. Henry S. Salt's "Kichard Jefferies, His Life and His 
Ideals," though a much better book, is a critical essay, and leaves the 
way clear for such a book as I have tried to write. For over twenty 
years I have known Jefferies' part of Wiltshire, and I hope that I have 
got most of what the country people had to tell about him and his 
family." 

The bulk of the book is taken up with a critical analysis of Jefferies' 
works, with very copious extracts. The author has evidently taken 
infinite pains to saturate himself with the atmosphere and to identify 
the localities which are the scenes of the various works, and doubtless 
on all such points the book will remain the standard authority on 
Jefferies' lore. The author's superlatives are reserved for " The Story of 
my Heart," as are also those of some other devout worshippers at the 
Jefferies shrine, and yet the "Plain Man" — who by the way meets 
with much obloquy in this book — continues to doubt whether Jefferies, 
the observer and the recorder, the Jefferies of the country books, will 
not live and be remembered long after Jefferies the mystic, the pagan, and 
the prophet, the morbid Jefferies of the " Story of my Heart" has been 
relegated to the limbo which is already so full of forgotten theologians 
and philosophers. 

Eeviewed at length, Times Literary Supplement, Feb. 4th; Standard, 
March 9th, 1909. 

Richard Jefferies. Article by T. Michael Pope in The Academy, 

March 28th, 1908, pp. 617—18. 
Anonymous article in Journal of Education, Oct. 1908, 

pp. 703—4. 

" More Ways in Wessex, Old World Haunts in the Saxon 
Kingdom," article in The Morning Leader, Oct. 26th, 1908, mentions 
many places in Wiltshire. 

[StOUrtOll.] " In a Wiltshire Village : some Old Songs and Customs." 
By E. E. Balch. The Antiquary, Oct. 1908, vol. IV.,N.S., pp. 379—382. 
This is an interesting article describing the old Mummers' Play on 
Christmas Eve, as well as another Christmas custom which seems to 
have been peculiar to Stourton. 1 

" Quite distinct from the Mummers, though also coming on Christmas 
Eve, was the Christmas Bull. The head of a bull, with great bottle eyes, 
large horns, and lolling tongue, was manipulated by a man stooping 
inside a body composed of a broomstick, a hide of sacking, and a rope 

1 Mrs. Story Maskelyne writes, on the authority of an informant, that about 
1830 — 40 the Wassailers used to go round at Christmas in West Gloucester- 
shire, and a man dressed in a bull's skin with ears and horns, and ends of 
bottles for eyes, used to run at the people. The butler at the great house had 
the hot drink ready in a large bowl and ladled it out at the correct moment. 



158 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

tail. The bull knocked at the door with its horns, and, if allowed to 
enter, chased the young people round the house, with fearsome curvets 
and bellowings. Even in the surrounding parishes the Christmas Bull is 
unknown, and I have never heard of the custom being practised in other 
parts of the country. The man in whose possession the bull was until 
quite recently, knows that it had been in his family for over one hundred 
years. It was used till about ten years ago. On Old Christmas Eve 
came the Wassailers with their traditional song : — 

Wassail, Wassail ! 
All round the town 
Your cup is so white 
And your beer is so brown, 
&c. 

The song of "The Plough Boy " is given at length, and a story of 
witchcraft "in a neighbouring village,'' of an old woman who in 1904 
believing that she was " overlooked," roasted a bullock's heart stuck full 
of pins and sat up all night watching it until the pins one by one fell out. 
This story savours far more of Somerset than of Wiltshire, and would 
probably be impossible anywhere in the centre or north of the connty. 

The Mummers' Play, portions of which only are given in this article, 
seems at Stourton to have differed considerably from either of the versions 
given in Wilts Arch. Mag, i., 79, and xxvii. ,311. The Stourton characters 
are given as seven in number, Father Christmas, the Duke and Duchess 
of Northumberland, Captain Curly from the Isle of Wight, Dr. Finley, 
Johnnie Jack, and " Bighead" or " Girthead." Johnnie Jack carried a 
number of small dolls on his back. The Turkish Knight does not appear 
at Stourton. 



A Guide to Avebury and Neighbourhood, by R. 

Hippisley COX. London, Edward Stanford, 12, 13, arid 14, Long 
Acre, W.C., 1909. 

Stiff paper covers, 8fin. X 6jin., pp. 68, 2s. net, with 16 good plans, (The 
Great Watersheds of England, Avebury Plain, The Temple, Temple and 
Avenues (Stukeley), The Avenue, Silbury Hill, and Temple, Barbury, 
Bincknoll, Earthworks near Clyffe Pypard, Earthworks to west of Clyffe 
Pypard,Bradenstoke, Oldbury Castle, Oliver's Castle, Bybury, Martinsell, 
Hatfield barrow). 

The preface of five pages by Lord Avebury explains the structure as 
the skeleton of a great chambered barrow with its peristalith of surround- 
ing stones and ditch. " Avebury was, it seems, the tomb of some great 
chief. But the very magnitude of the monument precluded its com- 
pletion. It was impossible to raise a mound or to cover over so great a 
space. Thus we can, I think, explain the main features of this mar- 
vellous monument." Lord Avebury makes a curious slip when he states 
that the bank is on the inner side of the ditch and the circle of great 
stones " inside the bank." 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 159 

The body of the work seems to bear evidence of having been consider- 
ably inspired by the imaginative work of the Messrs. Hubbard on 
Neolithic Dewponds and Cattle Ways. It sets out with the assumption 
that Avebury marks the meeting point of the watersheds of the South 
and "West and East of England, and also the meeting point of all the 
most important prehistoric trackways of the South of England, " the 
centre from which the ancient highways radiate." Now to support this 
theory there is the Eidgeway — and what else ? There are, it is true, 
numberless trackways and ditches of more or less importance everywhere 
on the downs but there is nothing to prove their specific age. The Author 
indeed, in the remainder of the book wanders cheerfully over the downs 
noting a barrow here and a "cattle trail'' there, a camp or a set of 
Lynchetts or a group of Sarsen stones further on, his central idea 
apparently being that the barrows were placed where they are, as a rule, 
for landmarks to mark out the course of the ancient ways. Barrows 
were undoubtedly largely used in Saxon times as boundary marks of 
parishes, etc., but to assert that they were placed on a particular spot 
originally as guide posts is quite another thing, though it is true that the 
idea is not a new one and that Hoare in two or three places in Ancient 
Wilts suggests the possibility. Barrows certainly are found frequently 
beside trackways — but it is at least as likely that the barrows were on the 
ground long before the tracks, which in after days followed the line of 
the barrows, as that the latter were intentionally placed where they are 
as sign posts. The writer's facts are not always to be relied on. He 
speaks for instance of Stukeley as mentioning fourteen Long Barrows near 
Avebury, whereas, as a matter of fact, he mentions six or possibly seven. 
The earthworks between Clyffe Pypard and Bupton are dwelt on as 
marking a prehistoric way up the hill, but nobody knows either the age 
or the purpose of these irregular works, or can even guess at them, and 
they may just as well be mediaeval as prehistoric. The Font at Avebury 
too, is Norman of the 12th Century and not Saxon. The book is well 
printed and the various plans are good and there is a great deal of some- 
what discursive information as to the whereabouts of ancient earthworks 
and modern dewponds — for pace the Messrs. Hubbard — no one has yet 
brought forward any sufficient evidence that there ever was such a thing 
as a Neolithic Dewpond on the downs of Wiltshire or elsewhere. 

A long and adverse notice of the book appeared in the Wiltshire 
Advertiser, May 20th, 1909, under the heading " Archaeology Run Wild," 
to which the author replies in a letter on June 3rd, " My purpose was to 
draw attention to certain facts indicating that during the Stone Age there 
existed in this country a national organisation of a highly developed 
character with Avebury as its centre. The Guide points out that the 
great hill ranges radiate from the plains round Avebury, and that lines 
of travel are to be traced above their watersheds as far as Seaton, in 
Devonshire, to the sea coast at Norfolk .... and also that these 
Routes are defended every ten miles or so by similar earthworks to those 
around Avebury, and that Avebury plain may be considered as the 
Clapham Junction of the system." 



160 JRecent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

Mallliesbury Abbey. The 1200th anniversary of the death of St. 
Aldhelm was celebrated at Malmesbury on May 25th, 1909. The Bishop 
of Bristol's address on St. Aldhelm is printed in the Wiltshire Times, 
May 29th, with cuts of the Abbey (S. side), S. Porch, Abbot's Pew or 
Watching Chamber, N. Arch, and Market Cross, and in Devizes Gazette, 
May 27th, 1909. An abstract of a lecture on the architectural history of 
the Abbey delivered on this occasion by Mr. H. Brakspear, F.S.A., is 
also printed in Devizes Gazette. 

Fontllill A good article in Wiltshire Times, May 15th, 1909, No. xxi. 
of " Picturesque Wiltshire." 

Bath StOne Quarrying", An article in The Estate Magazine, 
quoted in Wiltshire Times, October 24th, 1908, gives an interesting 
account of the present method of quarrying. 

" In former times Bath Stone was worked from surface quarries, but 
when the Box tunnel was in course of construction, it was found that the 
bastard freestone and scallet above the Bath Stone beds were quite strong 
enough to support the superincumbent rock and earth, with the result 
that nowadays the whole of the Bath stone quarries are worked as under- 
ground quarries. The quarry (near Corsham) leased by Messrs. Lucas 
& Kinnear covers an area of thirty acres. . . . Here the seam of 
Bath stone is seventy-three feet below the surface. . . . The quarries 
are large, well ventilated caverns, with endless passageways and great 
halls hewn out of the living rock. The Bath Stone seam totals about 
thirty feet in depth, consisting of a top bed of scallet, a soft stone very 
much resembling Caen stone, and capable of taking highly finished 
designs but suitable only for pulpit and similar indoor work, being too 
soft to stand the weather. This accounts for about seven feet of the 
depth, but as the demand for this is not very great, only small quantities 
are hewn. Below this is sixteen feet of good Bath stone obtainable in 
blocks of all shapes and sizes, from one ton to ten tons in weight, and 
from a cube foot to eleven or twelve feet in length and corresponding 
thickness. Below this again lies a bed of seven feet of weather stone. 
. Because of this softness and the liability of the stone to damage 
by frost (.when just quarried), none is brought to the surface between the 
months of October and April, the entire quantity quarried and sawn 
during that period being stacked underground until it may be safely 
brought to the surface to harden and mature. To properly stack it huge 
cranes are used, being fixed in the wider parts of the roadways with pins 
in ceilin CT and roof. . . . The stone is got for the quarry owners by 
parties of men under gangers. These gangers undertake, at a contract 
price, to produce a certain quantity of stone. . . . Wages average 
about 25*. per week. . . . The bulk of the stone is sold at an average 
price of Is. per cubic foot to builders within one hundred and fifty miles 
of the quarries, freight charges rendering it unprofitable to send it greater 
distances except by water." 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 161 

Lifted Owen Williams. Born at South Maston, in 1877, left school 
at 11, to work on a farm, and at 14 entered Swindon G.W.B. Works, in . 
the wagon frame shop. He studied English Literature, taught himself 
Latin and Greek, and in the intervals of his labour, for he is still in the 
"works," has written poems and a play, some of the former having been 
printed. 

An interesting article upon his life in the Daily Telegraph reprinted 
in Salisbury Journal, Jan. 23rd, 1909. 

Halmesbury Abbey and its Founders, article by j. p. 

Meehan in the Beacon, Nov., 1908, pp. 131, 132, with reproduction of 
old print of the Abbey from the river. 

Wiltshire, the COUnty in 1908. Devizes Gazette, January 
7th and 14th, 1909. By far the most carefully compiled and fullest 
account of events of all sorts in the county during the year. 

DevizeS, IiOSt Charities. The Wiltshire Advertiser, Sept. 17th 
and 24th, 1907, gives a curious list of "Vanished Charities," with some 
notes on the donors. These were William Bede, Councillor of Devizes ; 
Henry Morris, clothier, of Devizes ; John Archard, clothier, of Lyneham ; 
Walter Keymeis Clarke, Bector of Compton Bassett ; John Truslowe, 
of Avebury ; Dame Anne, widow of Sir Henry Sharington ; Hugh 
Attwell, Parson of St. Tewe, Cornwall ; William Barrett, of London, 
son of William Barrett, of Devizes ; Cleophas Smythe, of London, 
draper, born at Devizes ; and Thomas Flower, of London, draper, son of 
Stephen Flower, of Devizes. 

Trafalgar HOUSe. On Sept. 30th, 1908, the Hampshire Field Club 
visited Trafalgar House and Downton. At the former they were con- 
ducted over the House and shown the many portraits and Nelson relics 
of all kinds by Earl Nelson, whose notes on the history of the house and 
detailed descriptions of the various objects preserved there are printed 
at length in two columns of the account of the excursion in the Samp- 
shire Chronicle, October 3rd, 1908. Perhaps no such full notice of these 
extremely interesting relics has been printed before. 

Downton, visited on the same occasion, is the subject of a long paper 
in the Hampshire Chronicle, October 10th, 1908, by the Vicar, the Bev. 
R. G. Plumptre, giving long extracts from the Downton Parish 
Magazine, 1885—1888, on the history of the Manor, by Mr.T. F. Kirby, 
and on the history of Standlynch, the Moot, the Parsonage House, and 
the Church, by the Bev. A. D. Hill. The Moot was also described by 
Mr. W. Dale in "a short paper printed in the Hampshire Chronicle of 
October 3rd. 

The Moot, Downton, Wiltshire, the residence of Mr. E. Pitts 

Squarey. Country Life, Jan. 9th, 1909, pp. 54 — 62. An article signed 
" T," illustrated with the splendid photographic illustrations for which 
VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. M 



162 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

the paper is famous. They are, " North Front of the ' Laundry ' Build- 
ing," " The Western Elevation," " The South and West Sides," "The 
Temple," "As seen from the Doorstep," " The Giant's Chair," "The 
Loggia by the Pond," " A Saxon Parliament Place," "From the edge of 
the Earthworks," " Guardians of the Dial," " Detail of the Pedimental 
Centre." The writer by no means agrees with Messrs. Belcher and 
Macartney (Later Renaissance Architecture in England) , who attribute 
the original building of the house to 1650 and its alteration to 1720, and 
tell us that " the work of the two periods has been well combined, and 
the designer has so carefully preserved the character of the older work 
that it is in many cases difficult to see where one ends and the other 
begins. Even the mouldings, usually a sure index of date, give in this 
case but little clue." 

" T " combats this view and believes that the house was built as a 
whole cir 1685. The absence of the usual shield of arms over the pedi- 
mented doorway is accounted for by the fact that the Coles family who 
built the house, were not entitled to bear arms, for in a list of " all such 
as have usurpet the Names and Titles of Gentlemen without Authoritie 
and were Disclaimed at Salisburie in the County of Wiltshire in Sept. 
A° 1623 " we find " Barnabie Coles of Duncton " set down with fifty 
others and bracketed together as " Ignobiles Omnes." 

The Downton and other Moot Hills. The County 

Folk MOOt Of Wiltshire. Article, a column long, in Wilt- 
shire Times, March 13th, 1909, arguing that the grass terraces at " The 
Moot," Downton, are analogous to those of the Tynwald in the Isle of 
Man. The argument is by no means convincing, however, and the 
terraces are quite as likely to have been made in the 16th or 17th century. 

IiOllgleat. An article on the history of the house and the Thynne 
Family in Black and White, October 10th, reprinted in Wiltshire 
Advertiser, October 22nd, 1908, states that the building was commenced 
by Sir John Thynne, January 21st, 1567, and continued by him until 
March 29th, 1578, during which period a sum of over £8000 was spent 
on it. Two years later his son, Sir Johu, succeeded, continued the work, 
and added the oak screen and pannelling of the Hall. In 1808, Jeffery 
Wyatt constructed the present North Front and Grand Staircase. 

IiOllgleat- Article on, with illustrations of front of the house, in Estates 
Gazette, quoted in Devises Gazette, January 28th, 1909. 

Colepark. An estimate for building a wall round the park, temp. James 
I., is printed in Wiltshire Times, February 6th, 1909. 

HOIlOUr Of TrOWbridge. A note on various lands held under the 
Honour of Trowbridge is printed in Wiltshire Times, February 6th, 1909. 

" A True Relation of a number of people frozen to 

death near Salisbury, and in several other parts of the West 



Recent Wiltshire Boohs, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 163 

of England, on Tuesday, the twenty-third of December, 1684, besides 
horses and much other cattle. London : printed by George Larkin, at the 
Lower-end of Broad-Street, next to London Wall, 1685." A number of 
extracts from the above curious pamphlet, from the library of the Rev. 
Ed. Duke, of Lake House, are given in the Wiltshire Times, January 
28th, 1909. 

The Visit of the Geologists' Association to Marl- 
borough, Avebury, and Winterbourne Bassett, 

under the direction of the Rev. H. G. 0. Kendall, is well and fully 
described in the Marlborough Times, July 11th, 1908. Mr. Kendall 
mentioned the occurrence of well-made Palaeolithic implements at great 
heights on the downs. One in the collection of Mr. J. W. Brooke was 
found at a height of 870ft., another from near the same spot on Hackpen 
Hill, was in Mr. Kendall's own collection, whilst another came from a 
height of 940ft. 

Excursion to Avebury and Winterbourne Bassett, 

Saturday, July 4th, 1908. Director, H. G. O. Kendall, Report by the 
Director. 

Pamphlet, 8vo., pp. 536 — 539. Reprinted from the Proceedings of the 
Geologists' Association, vol. xx., part 7, 1908. 

Foreigners in Wilts in 1440. Under the title " Moonraking 
Flemings," an interesting note on the considerable number of foreigners 
resident in Wiltshire in 1440 is given in the Wiltshire Times, Oct. 10th, 
1908. They were chiefly Irishmen, Frenchmen, Normans, Flemings, and 
Dutchmen. They bore for the most part English names, descriptive of 
their occupation : Taillor, Barber, Wever, Frenchman, Chapman, Gold- 
smith, &c. 

Wiltshire Solitudes, a Tour in the Pembroke 

Country. "Cause and cure of unemployment." Article by R. L. 
Outhwayte in Daily Neivs, reprinted in Wiltshire Times, Jan. 30th, 1909. 
A description of a drive by Coombe Bissett, Bishopstone, Broad Chalke, 
and Wilton, through Lord Pembroke's estate. The moral is the evil of 
great estates and large farms, the cure is the taxation of land values. 

Wiltshire Quakers. A short note on some early Wiltshire Quakers 
in America, Wiltshire Timet, January 30th, 1909. 

Totes On Audley HOUSe, Salisbury, by J. J. H(ammond). A 
valuable article in the Salisbury Journal, Feb. 6th, 1909, which it is 
intended to reprint in this Magazine later on. 

trinity Hospital, Salisbury. An account of the re-opening of 

the Chapel of this Hospital after restoration, with an interesting series 
of notes on its history by Mr. T. H. Baker, is printed in Salisbury 
Journal, Feb. 27th, 1909. 

M 



164 Recent Wiltshire Boohs, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

" MautOll Horses." Articles in The Sporting Life, Feb. 10th and 
13th, and " A Visit to Manton," in The Sportsman, Jan. 26th, 1909, 
described the famous training establishment. 

The Will Of Margaret Hud, of Studley, in the parish of Trow- 
bridge, is printed in Wiltshire Times, March 27th, 1909. 

The Ancient Guilds of Salisbury. Twelfth Article 

This valuable series of articles is continued in the Salisbury Journal, 
October 17th and December 26th, 1908. Further extracts from the 
records of the Tailors' Guild are given at length. Among other interesting 
items are the inventory of goods belonging to the Corporation of Tailors 
in 1709, and a bill " amounting to £10 11*. 6d. for knots (rosettes) and 
other decorations for the members, Giant, etc., for use at the midsummer 
feast and procession, 1713." In the thirteenth article (December 26th) 
a further series of extracts, extending to two and a half columns, from 
the ledgers of the same Guild are given. 

Notes on Objects of the Bronze Age Found in Wilt- 
shire, " by the Eev. E. H. Goddard. An article in The Reliquary 
October, 1908, pp. 242—249, with fifteen illustrations from pen drawings 
in the text. These notes deal with objects in the Devizes Museum, in 
Mr. J. W. Brooke's collection, and elsewhere, which have not before 
been properly described or illustrated. 

Lord Fitzmaurice at Leigh House, Bradford-on-Avon, is th& j 

subject of an article in The World, one of a series of " Celebrities at 
Home," which is reprinted at length with a good portrait in the Wilt- 
shire Times, October 31st, and in Wilts Advertiser, November 5th, 1908, 
It contains a fairly full account of the new Chancellor of the Duchy of 
Lancaster's career, with some description of his home and its contents. 

Salisbury, the " Infirmary Walk." a note in The Nursing |j 

Mirror, Oct. 3rd, 1908, describes this annual function which dates back 
to the foundation of the Infirmary in 1776. It consists in the procession 
of the nurses and staff of the Infirmary and of as many patients as are able ■ 
to join in it, through the streets to the Cathedral to take part in the | 
Anniversary Thanksgiving Service, this being now amalgamated with the i 
annual Harvest Festival services at which the collections are for the I 
Infirmary. 

Ed. Gibbon at Devizes. The Wiltshire Advertiser, January 14th, J 
1909, has a note on the connection of the historian with Devizes. He I 
was a Captain in the Hampshire Militia for three years, and during the j 
latter part of the year 1761, when he was twenty-four, his regiment lay 
at " the populous and disorderly town of Devizes," during which time as \ 
the " little civility of the neighbouring gentry gave us no opportunity of < 
dining out," he set himself " to recover his Greek." 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 165 

Saxon Coins minted in Wiltshire. An interesting note on 

the number of Saxon coins from Wiltshire mints included in the Eoyal 
Cabinet of Medals at Stockholm, is printed in the Wiltshire Times, Dec. 
26th, 1908. From the Wilton Mint there are three varieties of Edgar, 
one of Edward II., thirty-five of Ethelred the Unready, eight of Canute, 
one of Harthacnut, and seven of Edward Confessor. From Old Sarum : 
seventeen of Ethelred, fifteen of Harold, ten of Edward Confessor. From 
Cricklade : fourteen of Ethelred, twenty of Canute, three of Harold, one 
of Harthacnut, two of Edward Confessor. From Malmesbury : eleven 
of Ethelred, seven of Canute, four of Harold, two of Harthacnut, one of 
Edward Confessor. 

LOCal EveiltS in 1908, in S. Wilts. Salisbury Journal, 
December 26th, 1908. 

Crafrbe. A critical article, by Oliver Elton, on the poetry and genius 
of Crabbe and his place in English Liturature, Blackwood's Magazine, 
Jan. 1909, vol. clxxxv., pp. 78—90. 

Crabbe, Complete Poetical Works. Edited by the Eev. a. 

J. and Mrs. Carlyle, with portrait. The Oxford Poet's Series. Henry 
Frowde, Oxford University Press, Amen Corner, London, E.C., 1908. 
Cloth, Cr. 8vo. 3*. 6d. ; on Oxford India Paper, from 5s. 

George Crabbe and his Times. By Bene Huchon, reviewed, 
Contemporary Review, Nov. 1908, pp. 14, 15. 

Wilts and Dorset Bank Annual. Salisbury. Christmas, 
1908. 

8vo., pp. 116, with six illustrations, of which " Presentation to Mr 
Tucker " (plate) and a view at " Stratford-sub-Castle " have to do with 
Wiltshire. By G. E. Dartnell (one of the editors, whose death took 
place just before the issue of the " Annual ") is a printed poem entitled 
" A Battle Hymn." Mr. W. A. Bogue gives "Entomological Notes for 
1908," dealing with Wilts and Dorset Lepidoptera taken during the 
year, and there is a very useful history of the Wilts and Dorset Bank ; 
otherwise the contents of this number are not concerned with the county 
of Wilts. 

Wiltshire Notes and Queries. No. 63. September, 1908. 

A good photo of the portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh by Zuccliero, 
formerly in the Parsonage Manor House at Downton, and now in the 
National Gallery, accompanies a note on the history of the picture. 
" Stokes " (Chancery Proceedings, Merryweather contra Stokes) ; " The 
Chrysom Book of St. Thomas, New Sarum"; "Genealogical Notes on 
the Houlton Family " ; " Records of Erchfont with Stert " ; " Peculiars 
of the Dean and Chapter of Sarum " ; and " Quaker Burials " are all 
continued. The will of Thomas Benett, Canon Residentiary of Sarum, 
s. of John Benett, of Norton Bavant, is printed. 



166 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

Palaeolithic Implements, &c ., from Hackpeu Hill, 
Winterbourne Bassett and Kuowle Farm Fit, 

Wiltshire, was the title of a paper by the Eev. H. G. 0. Kendall, 
read before the Geological Society on February 24th, 1909, of which a 
short abstract, with notes of the discussion which followed, is printed, 
pp. 61 — 63, Abstracts of the Proceedings of tlie Geological Society of 
London, No. 874, March 4th, 1909. 

An abstract of the paper and of the discussion following is also printed 
in the Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, May, 1909. Vol. 
lxv., pp. 166—168. 

Bishop Webb, Dean of Salisbury, 1901—1907. In 

jVEemoriam. Dedication of stained glass windows erected in Salis- 
bury Cathedral to the Memory of the Eight Eev. Bishop Allen Becber 
Webb, D.D., [Dean 1901—1907], with sermon by the Eight Rev. E. 
King, D.D., Lord Bishop of Lincoln. Sermons : I. Preached by Bishop 
Webb, in the Cathedral, Sunday, June 30th, 1901, the day following his 
installation. II. Preached by the Lord Bishop of Salisbury (Right Rev. 
J. Wordsworth, D.D.), in the Cathedral, Sunday, June 23rd, 1907." 

Pamphlet, 7^in. X 4§in., pp. 39, with portrait of Bishop Webb ; and 
illusts. of " Memorial Windows in Salisbury Cathedral," and " Salisbury 
Cathedral, North East." Dedication Service, February 2nd, 1909, 
reprinted from Salisbury and Winchester Journal, February 6th, 1909. 

John Halle, Merchant and Mayor of Salisbury. 

By Mrs. Collier. Paper in The Journal of the British Archaological 
Association, December, 1908, N.S., vol. xiv., pp. 221 — 242, with a plate 
of " The Halle of John Halle — Doorway." This paper gives some account 
of the " Halle of John Halle " and the heraldic glass in its windows, and 
then gives a rather discursive account of the events of John Hall's life 
so far as they are discoverable from the Salisbury city archives, with an 
appendix of letters from the King to the citizens of New Sarum, &oJ 
from the same source. 

Keevil No. XX. of articles on " Picturesque Wiltshire," in Wiltshire 
Times, April 10th, 1909, with three cuts, of " Talboys, Keevil," " Cottages 
at Keevil," and "Keevil Manor." 

The Experiences of Thomas Boulter, a Wiltshire high- 
wayman hanged at Winchester in 1778. Re-told in Wiltshire Times, 
April 10th, 1909. 

" A True Relation of the Approach of Frince Rupert 

to that good Towne of Marlborow, and how he was resisted by the 
Townesmen with the ayd of the faithful Militia of Wiltshire. "A portion 
of this Civil War pamphlet is reprinted in Wiltshire Times, March 6th, 
1909. 



Boohs, &c, by Wiltshire Authors. 167 

Steeple Asllton Church. A curious letter from John Tocke, of 
Trowbridge, gentleman, and Margaret his wife, widow and executrix of 
Thomas Lovell, Fremason, to the archbishop of Canterbury complaining 
that £49 out of '.£80 due to the late Thomas Lovell for work done in 
Steeple Ashton Church for Robert Longe " of Stepull Asheton .... 
Clotheman," had never been paid,is printed in Wiltshire Times, Feb. 27th, 
1909. 

Rev. J. Cr. Watson, D. W. Butler, G. S. A. Waylen, 
Edward Kite, C. E H. A. Colston, Lord Fitz- 

maurice, are subjects of personal notices as " Local Celebrities " of 
Devizes, in Wiltshire Advertiser, January 14th, 21st, 28th, February 
'4th, 11th, and 25th, 1909. 

Avebury Excavations, 1909. The Timesoi May 21st contained 
a preliminary account, and the same paper of June 3rd a more complete 
report of the work done in 1909, resulting chiefly in the discovery of 
the original entrance causeway on the E. side of the present entrance of 
the Kennet Road. Reprinted in Wiltshire Times, June 5th, 1909. 

The ditch, in the portion of it which was cleared, proved to be about 40 
feet wide at the top, 17 feet wide across the smooth flat bottom, and about 
17 feet deep from the present surface of the silting or 30 feet deep from 
the general level of the area inside the ditch. More Red Deer horns 
supposed to have been used as picks, a chipped flint knife, apparently of 
Neolithic age, and a shoulder blade bone, perhaps used as a shovel, were 
found on the bottom of the ditch. 



BOOKS, &c, BY WILTSHIBE AUTHOES. 



W. Maurice AdaniS, native of Grafton. "The Truce of God," or 
" The King in His Beauty," by W. Maurice Adams. London : Henry 
J. Drane, Limited, Danegeld House, 82a, Farringdon Street, E.C. 

Paper covers, 5jin. X 4in., pp. 31. Price 6d. Published January 1st, 
1909. 

"Jesus Rex," or "Into Thy Kingdom," by W. Maurice 

Adams [&c, as above]. 5jin. x 4in., pp. 32. January 1st, 1909. 

Emma Marie Caillard. "Ancient Wisdom and Modern Know- 
ledge." Article in Contemporary Review, May, 1908. 

" Subjective Science in Ordinary Life." Article in Contem- 
porary Seview, July, 1908, pp. 86 — 96. 

" Subjective Science and Religion." Article in Contem- 
porary Sevieiv, December, 1908, vol. xciv., pp. 718 — 730. 



168 Wilts Illustrations and Pictures. 

Maurice Hewlett, of Broad Chalke. " Halfway House ; a Comedy 
of Degrees." London: Chapman & Hall. 6*. [1908]. A novel. 
Reviewed, Spectator, December 19th, 1908. 

J. Stamper, of Swindon, " Modern Methods and Mechanical Appliances 
in Railway Offices." Article in G.W.R. Magazine, January, 1909. 

John Beddoe, M.D., LI..D. PES. "A Contribution to the 
Anthropology of the "West Riding." Paper in Yorkshire Archaologieal 
Journal, xix., pp. 31— 60, with folding coloured " Domesday Map of the 
West Riding." The title at the head of the paper is: "The Ethnology 
of West Yorkshire," by John Beddoe . . . and Joseph Hambley 
Rowe. 

R. D. Gillman. •< The History of a Conscript of 1813 and Waterloo- 
New translation from MM. Erckmann-Chatrian, by Russell Davis 
Gillman. London : J. M. Dent & Co. New York : E. P. Dutton & Co." 
7in. X 4Jin. ; cloth, 1*., leather, 2*. 

Eyre HuSSey. " Polly Winford." Longmans, Green, & Co., London, 
1909. Cr. 8vo., 6s. A novel of country life. 

COl. D. C. Fedder, of Ogbourne. " Pensions and Homes," article in 
Contemporary Review, December 1908, Vol. XCIV., pp. 743 — 747. 

Stephen Reynolds, of Devizes, "A Poor Man's House," Lane, 
1908, 6s., description of the life of fisher folk in Devonshire. Long 
notice, Devizes Gazette, Oct. 29th, 1908. 

John Wordsworth, D.D., Bishop of Salisbury. " Re- 
ordination." Two learned articles, The Guardian, Nov. 25th and Dec. 
2nd, 1908. 

Our Lord's idea of the Church. The Universal Mission. 

Sermon preached in the Cathedral on Easter Day, 1909. Printed in full, 
Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, May, 1909, pp. 91 — 94. 

Lady GrOVe. " The Human Woman," Smith, Elder & Co., London, 
1908. Demy 8vo., 5*. net. [Presents the case for Women Suffrage 
moderately]. 



WILTS ILLUSTRATIONS AND PICTURES. 



Stonehenge. Two photos of sunrise at Stonehenge on June 22nd. Country. 
Life, July 4th, 1908. 

Cavalry Camps on Salisbury Plain. Three photos : "Scene at Pond Farm 
Camp," " The Queen's Bays at the Water Troughs," and " In the Scots 
Greys Camp." Wiltshire Advertiser, August 20th, 1908. 



Wilts Portraits. 169 

Devizes, "Taking Down Tradesmen's Signs." Three photos. Wiltshire 
Advertiser, September 17th, 1908. 

Statue of King Henry VI., Salisbury Cathedral. Wiltshire Times, February 
6th, 1909. 

The Screens of Compton Bassett and Stockton Churches are illustrated in 
Screens and Galleries in English Churches, by Francis Bond, 1908. 

" Brass of Bishop Robert Wy ville in Salisbury Cathedral " and " George 
Herbert," illustrations in The Old Time Parson, by P. H. Ditchfield. 
London, 1908. 

" Maud Heath's Column " and " Maud Heath's Causeway," near Chippen- 
ham, illustrations in Holiday Making on Old Roads, by T. W. Wilkin- 
son. Windsor Magazine, September, 1908, pp. 417-425. 

" Trowbridge, United Church Parade." Three photos. Wiltshire Times, 
Oct. 31st, 1908. 

Mrs. Palmer's Stall (at Village Fair). Wiltshire Times, 

May 15th, 1909. 

"Wilton Free School." Group of Boys in their Uniform. Wiltshire Times, 

November 7th, 1908. 
Two Photographs of Stonehenge as seen from a War Balloon, communicated 

by Colonel J. E. Capper, R.E. Archceologia, lx., p. 571. Plates, lxix. 

lxx. 
Calne, The Hall, " Miss Charlesworth's Wiltshire Home." Daily Chronicle, 

January 8th ; Daily Mirror, January 11th and 12th ; Wiltshire Times, 

January 16th, 1909. 
Chippenham, New Wesleyan Chapel and Sunday Schools. Wiltshire Times, 

April 24th, 1909. 

New Constitutional Club. Devizes Gazette, April 22nd ; 

Wiltshire Times, May 1st, 1909. 

Art in England during the Elizabethan and Stuart Periods, by Aymer 
Vallance. Special Spring Number of The Studio, 1908, 4to, has 
illustrations of the George Inn and House in St. Anne's Street, Salisbury ; 
Porch at Laverstock ; Berwick St. Leonard ; and Iron Latches and 
Scutcheon, Malmesbury. 



WILTS PORTRAITS, 



Lady de Grey. The Ladies' Field, Sept. 29th, 1908. 

Miss Dorothea G. Mann, d. of Mr. W. J. Mann, of Highfield, Trowbridge, 

(Mrs. W. H. Montgomery), Ladies' Field, Oct. 24th, 1908. 
Wiltshire Mayors. L. H. Marshall (Chippenham) ; W. F. Smith (Calne) ; 

T. Perkins (Salisbury) ; W. S. Bambridge (Marlborough) ; J. E. Hopkins 

(Devizes) ; T. Hooper Deacon (Swindon); A.L.Forrester (Malmesbury) ; 

G. Bell (Wilton) ; Wiltshire Times, Nov. 14th, 1908. 



170 Wilts Portraits. 

Mrs. Scott and her babies, the Holt Triplet, Wiltshire Times, Nov. 14th, 1908. 
Lord. Lansdowne. Wiltshire Times, Nov. 28th, 1908 ; and Lady Lansdowne. 

Ladies 1 Field, Jan. 9th, 1909. 
Miss Florence Rich, d. of Canon Rich, late Vicar of Chippenham (Mrs. H. 

Prince), Ladies' Field, Nov. 28th, 1908. 
A. J. Beaven. Wiltshire Times, Dec. 26th, 1908. 
Tom Moore, of Bradford-on-Avon. Wiltshire Times, Dec. 26th, 1908. 
Lady Dickson-Poynder. Ladies' Field, Dec. 26th, 1908. 
Lord and Lady Charles Fitzmaurice. Ladies' Field, Jan. 9th, and Daily 
Mail, Jan. 14th, 1909. Lady Charles Fitzmaurice. The Throne, Jan. 
23rd, 1909. 
"Teddy" Haskell (murdered) and Mrs. Haskell (Salisbury). Wiltshire 

Advertiser, Nov. 5th and 19th, 1908, and Feb. 18th, 1909. 
J. E. Hopkins, Mayor of Devizes. Wiltshire Advertiser, Nov. 12th, 1908. 
Rev. T. O. Prosser, Pastor of Congregational Church, Devizes. Wiltshire 

Advertiser, Oct. 1st, 1908. 
Bev. T. Anthony, Pastor of Congregational Church, Ramsbury, for 30 years. 

Wiltshire Advertiser, Sept. 24th, 1908. 
Mr. Arthur Alfrey and Miss Joan Clutterbuek. Wiltshire Times, Feb. 6th, 

1909. 
Bishop Webb, late Dean of Salisbury. Wiltshire Times, Feb. 6th, 1909. 
Tom May, of Ashley, near Bmdford-on-Avon. Wiltshire Times, Feb. 20th, 

1909. 
Mrs. J. Fuller, Wiltshire Times, March 6th, 1909. 
Lady Beatrix Wilkinson. Ladies' Field, Feb. 27th, 1909. 
James Pearce, Pilot, of Newport, S. Wales, and his wife, both born at Trow- 

bridge. Wiltshire Times, March 13th, 1909. 
J. M. F. Fuller, M. P., and J. M. Maclulick. Wiltshire Times, May 1st, 1909. 
Lady Avebury (and Lord Avebury). Daily Chronicle, April 30th, 1909. 
J. H. Merritt, of Market Lavington. Wiltshire Times, March 27th, 1909. 
Alec Taylor, of Manton. Portrait with account of his success as. a Trainer. 

Sporting Chronicle, Jan. 26th, 1909. 
Bev. P. G. W. Filleul, new Bector of Devizes. Devizes Gazette, April 1st, 

1909. 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Owen, of Trowbridge. Wiltshire Times, April 24th, 
1909. 



171 



ADDITIONS TO MUSEUM AND LIBEAEY. 
Museum. 

Presented by Me. W. Cunnington, son of the late Mr. W. Cunnington, 
F.G.S. : A Table made from Wiltshire Septaria, and Oak 
grown in Wiltshire, by a Devizes man. 
„ „ Eev. C. V. Goddard : Piece of ornamental Ironwork obtained 

at Trowbridge ; old pair of tongs ; ivory ball or die with 
many facets numbered up to thirty- one, obtained at Salis- 
bury. 
„ „ The Vicab and Churchwardens of St. James' Church, 
Southbroom : The Clappers of three Bells (the Treble, 3rd, 
and Tenor) recently re-cast, the Treble dating from 1633, 
the other two from 1612. 
„ Dr. H. P. Blackmore : A Collection of Eoliths from Alderbury 

Hill. 
„ Eev. G. E. Hadow : Nuremburg Token found in Calne Church 

during Eestoration, 1864. 
„ Eev. H. H. Mogg: Eushlight holder from Bromham House. 
„ Me. Fidler: Small Plate of Eoman (?) Enamel found near 

Quarry at Teffont Evias. 
„ Mr. J. D. Offer : Shuttle of Hand Loom used by the donor's 

Aunt in the last hand loom at Bromham. 
„ Mr. B. H. Cunnington; Bronze Tweezers found at Alton 
Barnes. (?) Eoman ; Earthenware Pitchers, 17th or 18th 
century, dug up in the Brittox, Devizes ; Small Vase of 
Coarse Eed Pottery dug up on the Green, Devizes ; a num- 
ber of 17th and 18th century Tobacco Pipes from the site of 
Wadworth's Brewery, Devizes, and Beekhampton ; Upper 
Stone of Quern with hole in the side for handle, weighing 
91 lbs., ploughed up in a field below Eybury Camp, 1909 ; 
Stand for Halberts in Museum, and a Wall Case for Stour- 
head Eoom. 
,, ., Eev. H. G. 0. Kendall; Palaeolithic Flints from Knowle. 

„ „ Mr. Walter Eales : Many Specimens of Lepidoptera. 

„ „ Mr. E. Cook : Specimens of Lepidoptera. 

„ „ Me. Heginbothom : Specimens of Lepidoptera. 

Library. 

Presented by The Author (Mr. J. F. Meehan) : Article on Malmesbury 

Abbey. 
„ „ Mr. H. Bevir : Twenty-eight volumes of Eegisters of Voters. 

„ „ Mrs. W. Cunmngton, widow of late Mr. W. Cunnington, 

F.G.S. : Thirteen framed Engravings of Stonehenge. 



172 Additions to Museum and Library. 

Presented by The Author (Colonel H. Graham) : " Annals of the 
Yeomanry Cavalry of Wiltshire." Vol. II., 1908. 
,, ., The Author (W. Maurice Adams): "Grafton Chimes," and 

two Pamphlets. 
,, ,, Ma. H. E. Medlicott : Devizes Gazette, Salisbury Diocesan 

Gazette, North Wilts Charch Magazine ; complete sets 
for 1908. 
„ ,, Mr. A. ScHOMBERtv : " A Genealogical Account of the Mayo 

and Elton Families of Wilts and Herefordshire." 4to., 
1908. " Wilton House and its Literary Associations." 
,, „ The Publishers (Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons): "The Life of 

Sir Isaac Pitman." 1908. 

„ ,, The Author (Dr. J. Beddoe, F.R.S.) : " A Contribution to 

the Anthropology of the West Riding." 

,, „ Mr. J. J. Hammond. Ten Plates intended for Duke's 

Prolusiones Historicce, Vol. II. . and Druidical Temples. 

„ „ Messrs. Jackson & Jackson : Plan of Devizes, 1735, and 

" Rules and Regulations of tlie Devizes Loyal 
Volunteers," 1803. MS. map on vellum of South- 
broom, &c, by James Overton, 1737, 1738, in two 
parts. 

,, ,, Rev. C. V. Goddard : South Wills Church Magazine for 

1908 ; Salisbury Journal for 1908. 

,, „ Rev. H. G. O. Kendall (the author) : Abstract of paper on 

" Palaeolithic Implements from Hackpen Hill," &c, read 
before the Geological Society, and article in Man. 

,, „ Mr. H. W. Dartnell & Miss Dartnell : Wilts and Dorset 

Bank Annual, 1908. Twenty-four views of Salisbury. 
Plan of Salisbury. Plan of Old Sarum. Song of 
Ccedmon, by G. E. Dartnell. Forty Pamphlets and 
articles from magazines, and a number of cuttings and 
scraps connected with Wiltshire. " Sketches from 
Marlborough." 

„ ,, Mr. C. C. Bradford : 245 old Wiltshire Deeds, two Acts of 

Parliament, Elcombe and Uffcot enclosure Award ; 
Register of Voters, Cricklade, 1834. Forty Wilts Estate 
Sale Catalogues. 

„ „ Rev. E. H. Goddard : Wiltshire Picture Postcards. 

„ ,, Mr. B. H. Cunnington : List of the Officers of local Militia, 

1810. 

,, ,, Mr. E. O. P. Bouverie : Wiltshire Advertiser for 1908. 



173 



(Any Member whose name or address is incorrectly printed in this List is 
requested to communicate with the Financial Secretary, 

WILTSHIRE 

Penological ant Natural f^tstorg <£octet|j. 



JUNE, 1909. 



Patron : 
The Most Hon. The Mabquis of Lansdowne, K.G. 

President : 
The Rt. Hon. The Earl of Pembkoee and Montgomeet. 

Vice-Presidents : 



The Right Hon. Lord Avebury 
The Most Hon. The Marquis of Bath 
The Right Rev. The Lord Bishop 

of Bristol, F.S.A. 
Nevil Story Maskelyne, Esq., F.R.S. 
H. E. Medlicott, Esq. 



The Right Hon. Earl Nelson 

The Rev. H. A. Olivier 

The Right Rev. The Lord Bishop 

of Salisbury 
C. H. Talbot, Esq. 



Trustees . 



The Right Hon. Lord Avebury 

Charles Awdry, Esq. 

The Most Hon. The Marquis of Bath 

W. Heward Bell, Esq., F.G.S., 

C. E. H. A. Colston, Esq. 

The Right Hon. Lord Estcourt 



G. P. Fuller, Esq. 

A. Grant-Meek, Esq. 

The Most Hon. The Marquis of 

Lansdowne, K.G. 
The Right Hon. Earl Kelson 



The Committee consists of the following Members, in addition to the 
Honorary Officers of the Society : 



Rev. E. J. Bodington, The Vicarage, 

Galne 
J. I. Bowes, Esq., Devizes 
R.H. Caird, Esq.,SouthbroomHouse, 

Devizes 
Mrs. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes 
C. F. Hart, Esq., Devizes 
Rev.J.Hamlyn Hill, D.D., Erchfont 



Rev. C. W. Hony, Woodborough, 

Pewsey S.O., Wilts 
Rev. E. P. Knubley, Steeple Ashton 

Vicarage, Troivbridge 
H. E. Medlicott, Esq., Sandfield, 

Potterne S.O., Wilts 
Rev. Canon Thynne, Seend 



Honorary General Secretaries : 
E. 0. P. Bouverie, Esq., P.S.A., The Old House, Market Lavington, Wilts 
Rev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Pypard Vicarage, Swindon 

Honorary Curator of the Museum : 
B. H. Cunnington, Esq., F.S.A. Scot, Devizes 

Deputy Honorary Curator : 
Edward Cook, Esq., Devizes 

Honorary Librarian : 
Rev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Pypard, Swindon 



174 



List of Members. 



Honorary Local Secretaries : 



A. D. Passmore, Esq., Swindon 
Rev. J. Penrose, West Ashton, 

Trowbridge 
C. E. Pouting, Esq., F.S.A., Marl- 

borough 
Arthur Schomberg, Esq., Seend, 

Melksham 



T. H. Baker, Esq., 91,Brown Street, 

Salisbury 
A. W. N. Burder, Esq., F.S.A., 

Selcombe Court, Bradford- on- 

Avon 
R. S. Ferguson, Esq., Elm Grove, 

Calne 
Rev. C. V. Goddard, Baverstock, 

Salisbury ' 

Honorary Treasurer : 
C. E. H. A. Colston, Esq., Roundway Parle, Devizes 

Honorary Auditors : 
G. S. A. Waylen, Esq., Devizes 
E. F. Toone, Esq., Devizes 

Financial Secretary .- 
Mr. David Owen, F.C.A., Bank Chambers, Devizes 



List of Societies, &c, in union with the 
Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society 

For interchange of Publications, 8fc. 

Society of Antiquaries of London 
Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland 
British Archaeological Association 
Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 
Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 
Kent Archaeological Society 
Somerset Archaeological Society 
Essex Archaeological Society 
Essex Field Club 
Hampshire Field Club 
Bath Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club 
Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society 
Clifton Antiquarian Club 
Herts Natural History Society and Field Club 
Powysland Club 
East Riding Antiquariau Society, Yorks 
East Herts Archaeological Society 
Cotteswold Naturalists' Field Club 
United States Geological Survey 
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D.C. , United States 
Dorset Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club 
Surrey Archaeological Society 
The Reliquary and Illustrated Archaeologist 
The Architectural and Topographical Society 



List of Members. 



175 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



Life Members . 



Antrobus, Lady, Amesbury Abbey, 

Salisbury 
Avebury, The Right Hon. Lord, 15, 

Lombard Street, London, E.C. 
Awdry, Charles, Lavington Manor, 

Devizes 
Crewe, Eight Hon. Earl of, Crewe 

Hall, Cheshire 
Ellis, Kev. J. H., 29, Collingham 

Gardens, South Kensington, Lon- 
don, S.W. 
Fitztnaurice, The Et. Hon. Lord, 

Leigh, Bradford-on-Avon 
Lansdowne, Most Hon. Marquis of, 

K.G., Bowood, Calne 
Mnllings, John, Cirencester 



Pembroke and Montgomery, Eight 
Hon. Earl of, Wiltou House, 
Salisbury [Salisbury 

Penruddocke, C, Compton Park, 

Eadnor, Eight Hon. Earl of, Long- 
ford Castle, Salisbury 

Salisbury, The Et. Rev. The Lord 
Bishop of, The Palace, Salisbury 

Stancomb, John P., Shaw House, 
Melksham 

Walmesley, John, Lucknam, Chip- 
peuham 

Wordsworth, Eev. Canon, St. Peter's 
Eectory, Marlborough 

Wyndham, The Hon. Percy, 44, 
Belgrave Square, London, S.W. 



Annual Subscribers. 



Adderley Library, Librarian of, The 

College, Marlborough 
Anstie, G. E., Waileigh Lodge, 

Walton, Clevedon 
Arnold, P. J., The Quillet, Crane 

Bridge Road, Salisbury 
Awdiy, Rev. E. Seymour, Manor 

Cottage, Seend, Melksham 
Awdry, Justly W., The Paddocks, 

Chippenham 



Bagot, Rev. Sidney C.,Horniugsham, 

Warminster 
Baker, T. H., 91, Brown Street, 

Salisbury 
Barrett, W. H., Marshfield Road, 

Chippenham 
Bath Corporation Library, Bath 
Bath, The Most Hon. the Marquis 

of, Longleat, Warminster 
Beaveti, Edwin C, Arboyne, Holt, 

Wilts 



Beddoe, Dr., P.E.S., The Chantry, 
Bradford-on-Avon 

Bell, W. Heward, F.G.S., Cleeve 
House, Seend, Melksham 

Benett-Stanford, J., Hatch House, 
Tisbury, Salisbury 

Benton, Philip, Bishopstrow, War- 
minster 

Benton, Mrs., Bishopstrow, War- 
minster 

Bernard, Rev. Canon E. R., The 
Close, Salisbury 

Bethel!, S., 12, Hughenden Road, 
Clifton, Bristol 

Bird, W. R., Laboratory, G.W.R. 
Works, Swindon 

Blackmore, Dr. H. P., Salisbury 

Blake, Henry, Elmhurst, Trow- 
bridge 

Blathwayt, Geo. W. W., Melksliam 
House, Melksham 

Blount, G. L. W., 39, High St., 
Salisbury 

Bodingtou, Rev. Eric J., The 
Vicarage, Calne 



176 



List of Members. 



Bosauquet, Miss, Springfields, Calne 
Bourne, Rev. G. H., D.C.L., St. 

Edmund's College, Salisbury 
Bouverie, Miss A. Pleydell, The 

Old House, Market Lavington 
Bouverie, E. 0. P., F.S.A., The Old 

House, Market Lavington, Devizes 
Bowes, J. I., Campfield, Devizes 
Bowes, W. H. B., Campfield, Devizes 
Bradford, J. E. G„ 16, Marlborough 

Buildings, Bath 
Brewer, A., West Street, Wilton 
Bristol, The Rt. Rev. the Lord Bishop 

of, The Palace, Bristol 
Bristol Municipal Public Libraries, 

Bristol 
Brooke, J. W., Rosslyn, Marlborough 
Brown, Henry, Salisbury 
Brown, Rev. R. G., Little Somerford 

Rectory, Chippenham 
Buchanan, Venerable Archdeacon, 

North Canonry, Close, Salisbury 
Buckley, Rev. Canon Felix J., Pine 

Grange, Bath Road, Bournemouth 
Buller, Mrs. Tremajne, Sop well, Nr. 

St. Albans 
Burdev, Alfred W. N., F.S.A., 

Belcombe Court, Bradford-on- 

Avon 
Burgess, Rev. C. P., Stratton St. 

Margaret, Swindon 
Burkhardt, G. H., Don Head, 

Westlecott Rd., Swindon 
Bush, James, Avon View, Old Sarum, 

Salisbury 
Bush, J. E., Melksham 
Bush, Hobert C, 1, Winifred's Dale, 

Cavendish Road, Bath 
Butt, Rev. Walter A., Oakwood, 

Chepstow 
Buxton, Gerard J., Tockenham 

Manor, Swindon 
Bvrde, Rev. H. C. W., Ludgershall 

Rectory, Andover 



Caillard, Sir Vincent H. P., Wing- 
field House, Trowbridge 

Caird, R. H., Southbroom House, 
Devizes 

Carpenter, Joseph, The Manor 
House, Stratford-sub-Castle, Salis- 
bury 



Case, Henry, Wistaria Lodge, 

Whiteparish, Salisbury 
Chafyn-Grove, G. Troyte, North 

Coker House, Yeovil 
Chalmers, Miss, Long Street, Devizes 
Chamberlaine, Rev. E., Maiden 

Bradley Vicarage, Bath 
Chandler, W., Aldbourne R.S.O., 

Wilts 
Chivers, Giles, Saint John Street, 

Devizes 
Clark-Maxwell, Rev. W. G., Clun- 

bury Vicarage, Aston-on-Clun, 

R.S.O., Shropshire 
Clark, Miss M., Prospect House, 

Devizes 
Clifton, The Rt. Rev. The Lord 

Bishop of, St. Ambrose, Leigh 

Woods, Bristol 
Coates, John, The Academy, North 

St., Wilton, Salisbury 
Cockin, Ven. Archdeacon J. I. B., 

Milton Vicarage, Pewsey S.O., 

Wilts 
Cole, S. J., Wilts County Asylum, 

Devizes 
Colston, C. E. H. A., Roundway 

Park, Devizes 
Cook, Edward, Walden Lodge, 

Devizes 
Cookson, H. Theodore, Sturford 

Mead, Warminster 
Cooper, Rev. W. H. Hewlett, 

Tockenham Rectory, Swindon 
Coward, Edward, Roundway, Devizes 
Coward, Mrs., Rouudway, Devizes 
Cox, E. Richardson, Soutli Wraxall 

Manor, Bradford -on-Avon 
Crawford, 0. G. S., The Grove, East 

Woodhay, Newbury 
Crespi, Dr. A. J. H., Wimborne 
Crisall, Rev. J. S., All Cannings, 

Devizes 
Cunuington, B. H., F.S.A., Scot., 

33, Long Street, Devizes 
Cunnington, Mrs. B. H., 33, Long 
Street, Devizes 



Dartnell, H. W. Abbotsfield, Salis- 
bury 

Denton, Rev. Sidney, St. Mary's 
Rectory, Cricklade 

Devenish, Matthew H. W., Little 
Duruford, Salisbury 



List of Members. 



1*77 



Dickins, F. Victor, C.B., The Lodge, 

Seend, Melksham 
Dickson-Poynder, Sir John, Bart., 

M.P., Hartham Park, Corsham 
Dirom, Mrs. Isabella A., Fyfield 

Manor, Pewsey, S.O., Wilts 
Dixon, S. B., Pewsey, S.O., Wilts 
Dotesio, W. C, Bradford -on -Avon 
Dryden, Miss, Foxcombe Hill, 

Oxford 
Dubourg, A. W., The Mount, 

WiltoD, Salisbury 
Dunne, A. M., The Highlands, Calne 



Engleheart, Rev. G. H., Dinton, 

Salisbury 
Ewart, Miss, Coneyhurst, Ewhurst, 

Guildford 
Ewart, Miss M., Broadleas, Devizes 
Eyre, G. E. Briscoe, Warrens, 

Bramshaw, near Lyndburst, Hants 
Eyres,. Edwin, Lacock, Chippenham 



Ferguson, R.'S., M.B., CM., Elm 

Grove, Calne 
Firman, Bev. S., Cherhill Rectory, 

Calne 
Fisher, John, St. Edith's Marsh, 

Chippenham 
FitzGerald, G. A. R., Bearfield 

House, Bradford-on-Avon 
Fletcher, Frank, The Lodge, 

Marlborough College, Marl- 
borough 
Forrester, Mrs., Lea Cottage, 

Malmesbury 
Forster, Qarnaby, Vasterne Manor, 

Wootton Bassett 
Fox, F. F., Yate House, Tate, 

R.S.O., Gloucestershire 
Pox, H. E., Jeune House, Salisbury 
jPry, E. A., Thornhill, Kenley, 

Surrey 
(Fuller, G. P., Neston Park, Corsham 
jPuller, R. F. , Neston Park, Corsham 
Purness, Sir Christopher, D.L., J.P., 

M.P., Tunstall Court, West Hart- 
I lepool 

i T OL. XXXVI. — NO. CXI. 



Giddings, Edwin, Park Cottage, 

Devizes 
Gilbert, A. John, High Street, 

Swindon 
Gladstone, John E., Bowden Park, 

Chippenham 
Goddard, Rev. C. V., Baverstock, 

Salisbury 
Goddard, Rev. E. H., ClyfEe Pypard, 

Swindon 
Goddard, F. Pleydell, The Lawn, 

Swindon 
Godsal, Captain W., Royal Colonial 

Institute, Northumberland Avenue, 

London, W.C. . 
Goldney, F. H., Beechfield, Corsham, 

Wilts 
Goldney, Sir John T., Monk's Park, 

Corsham 
Goldney, Sir Prior, Bart., Derriads, 

Chippenham 
Goldsbrough, Albert, Pickering, 

Yorks 
Goodchild, Rev. W., Berwick St. 

John Rectory, Salisbury 
Gow, James, West Street, Wilton, 

Salisbury 
Grant-Meek, A., Hillworth House, 

Devizes 
Greville, the Hon. Louis, Heale 

House, Woodford, Salisbury 
Grose, Samuel, M.D., Bishops 

Teignton, Teignmouth 
Grove, S., 22, High St., Salisbury 
Grove, Mrs., 22, High St., Salisbury 
Grove, Sir Walter, Bart., Sedgehill 

Manor, Shaftesbury 
Giinther, Emil, Garswood, Parkfield 

Road, Didsbury 
Gwatkin, R. G., Manor House, 

Potterne S.O., Wilts 
Gwillim, E. LI., Marlborough 
G.W.R. Mechanics' Institution, 

Swindon 



Haden, J. Poynton, Egremont, 
Trowbridge 

Hadow, Rev. G. R., Wylye S.O., 
Wilts 

Hall, R. M., Haslemere, East Ham- 
ham, Salisbury 

N 



178 



List of Members. 



Harrison, Rev. D. P., Lydiard Milli- 

cent Rectory, Swindon 
Harrison, Rev. Francis, 21, Charlotte 

Street, Bath 
Hart, C. F., The Breach, Devizes 
Haskins, Charles, Brownie-Brae, 

Wain along Road, Salisbury 
Hawley, Lt.-Col., R.E., Figheldean, 

Salisbury 
Hay, Rev. R. W., Garsdon Rectory, 

Malmesbury 
Heard, J. A., Beckhampton, Marl- 
borough 
Heath, R. S., The Strand, Calne, 

Wilts 
Henslow, Rev. T. G. W., Stanton St. 

Quintin Rectory, Chippenham 
Hill, Rev. A. Du Boulay, East 

Bridgford, Nottinghamshire 
Hill, Rev. J. Hamlyn, D.D., Erch- 

font Vicarage, Devizes 
Hillier, H. W., 21, High Street, 

Marlborough 
Hoare, Sir Henry H. A., Bart, 

Stourhead, Bath 
Hobhouse, Sir C. P., Bart., Monkton 

Farleigh, Bradford-ou-Avon 
Hobson, Francis, The Prospect, 

Trowbridge 
Holden, Rev. 0. A., Penn Vicarage, 

Wolverhampton 
Holden, Rev. 0. M., The Rectory, 

Steeple Langford S.O., Wilts 
Holloway, Henry Thos., 19, Cedars 

Road, Clapham Common, S. W. 
Hony, Rev. C. W., Woodborough, 

Pewsey S.O., Wilts 
Hornby, C. H. St. J., Porch House, 

Potterne S.O., Wilts 
Hoskings, H., Riverside, Newbury 
Houston, Capt. C. S., The Manor 

House, Codford St. Peter, Wilts 
Hutchings, Rev. Canon R. S., Alder- 
bury, Salisbury 



Inman, Rev. Canon E., Saudecotes 
Lodge, Parkstone, Dorset 



Jackson, J. T., Devizes 

Jeff eries, Miss M., St. Helen's Lodge, 

Ipswich 
Jenner, Captain L. C, The Manor 

House, Avebury, Marlborough 



Keble, Rev. R. J., Wroughton Vic- 
arage, Swindon 

Keir, W. Ingram, F.R.C.S.E., The 
Limes, Melksham 

King, Walter E., Donhead Lodge, 
Salisbury 

Kinneir, H., Redville, Swindon 

Knight-Adkin, Rev. H. Kenrick, 
Hankerton Vicarage, Malmesbury 

Knox, G., Brooklyn House, Seming- 
ton, Trowbridge 

Knubley, Rev. E. P., Steeple Ashton 
Vicarage, Trowbridge 



Lambert, Rev. S., Bremhill Vicarage, 

Calne 
Lang, Miss M. J., Fairfield, Rock- 

leaze, Bristol 
Langley, Rev. John, North Wraxhall 

Rectory, Chippenham 
Lansdown, G., Wingfield Road, 

Trowbridge 
Laverton,W. H., Leighton,Westbury 
Lawes, E. Thornton H., 1, Mitre 

Court Buildings, Temple, Loudon, 

E.C. 
Lawrence, Rev. T. J., L.L.D., 
• Upton Lovell Rectory, S.O., Wilts 
Lawrence, W.F., Co wesfield, Salisbury 
Leaf, Mrs. Herbert, The Green, 

Marlborough 
Lear, Ven. Archdeacon, Bishopstone 

Rectory, Salisbury 
Lewis, Rev. R. W. M., 8, Chichele 

Road, Cricklewood, London, N.W. 
Little, W. G., 32, Fleet St., Swindon 
Livingstone, Rev. Canon R. G.J 

Brinkworth Rectory, Chippenham 
Llangattock, The Rt. Hon. Lord, 

The Hendre, Monmouth 
Llewellin, J., New Park Street, 

Devizes 
Lloyd, Rev. J. A., Knowle, 

Godalmiug 
Locket, J. Wood, Inglewood, Melk- 
sham 
Long, Frederick W. , Courtfield 

House, Trowbridge 
Long, Rt. Hon. W. H., M.P., Rood 

Ashton, Trowbridge 
Long, Col. William, Newton House, 

Clevedou 
Lovibond, Joseph W., Lake House 

Salisbury 



List of Members. 



179 



Lucas, J., 18, Market Place, War- 
minster 

Luxmoore, L. A., 60, Bath Koad, 
Swindon 



Mackay, William, Trowbridge 
Mackesy, Rev. T. L., 96, Stafford 

Street, Swindon 
Magrath, Col., Bann-a-boo, Co. Wex- 
ford, Ireland 
Main, Geo. J., The Priory, Brown 

Street, Salisbury 
Maiden, A. R„ F.S.A., The Close, 

Salisbury 
Mann, William H., Plain House, 

Hinton Charterhouse, Nr. Bath 
Manley, Rev. F. H., Somerford 

Magna Rectory, Chippenham 
Mann, William J., Trowbridge 
Marlborough College Natural History 

Society, President of, The College, 

Marlborough 
Marten, H., Southgate House, 

Devizes 
Martin, Miss K. Wykeham, Purton, 

Swindon 
Maskelyne, E. Story, Hatt House, 

Box, Wilts 
Maskelyne, N. Story, F. R.S. , Bassett 

Down, Swindon, Wilts 
Masters, W. A. H., 1, Regent's 

Circus, Swindon 
Matcham, G. Eyre, Newhouse, 

Salisbury 
Mayo, Rev. R., Ivy House, Corsham 
Mc Millan, Rev. Canon C. D. H, 

The Vicarage, Malmesbury 
McNiven.C. F., Puckshipton, Pewsey 
Meade, Rev. the Hon. S., Frank- 

leigh House, Bradford- on- Avon 
Medlicott, H. E., Sandfield, Potterne 
Medlicott, Walter B., 18, Campden 

Hill Gardens, London, W. 
Meek, H. Edgar, The Ark, Devizes 
Merriman, E. B., Marlborough 
Merriman, R. W., Sempringham, 

Marlborough 
Messenger, H., 45, High Street, 

Salisbury 
Methuen, Gen. Lord, G.C.B., 

K.C.V.O., C.M.G., Corsham 

Court 
Milling, Rev. M. J. T., Vicarage, 

Ashton Keynes, Cricklade 



Milman, Miss, Brownston House, 

Devizes 
Milner, Major E., The Grove, Cor- 
sham 
Mitchell, Arthur C, High Grove, 

Tetbury, Gloucestershire 
Moberly, Rev. Edgar W., Lacock 

Vicarage, Chippenham 
Mogg,Rev. H. H., Bishops Cannings, 

Devizes 
Money-Kyrle, Mrs., Whetham, Calne 
Moore, Wm. Vincent, jun., West 

Street, Wilton, Salisbury 
Morrin, Rev. T., St. Joseph's Place, 

Devizes 
Morrison, Hugh, Little Ridge, 

Tisbury, Wilts [Swindon 

Morse, L. L., M.P., The Croft, 
Moulder, V. J., F.R.SA. (Ireland), 

7, Lower Downs Road, Wimbledon, 

S.W. 
Mundy, H., Trowbridge 
Murray, Rev. A. S., Horningsham 

Vicarage, Warminster 
Murray-Shirreff, Mrs. A., Whitley 

Brow, Melksham 
Murray, Thomas R., Keverstone, 

Cleveland Walk, Bath 
Myers, Rev. Canon, St. Martin's 

Rectory, Salisbury 



Naish, Miss R. V., Wilton, Salisbury 
Neeld, Lieut. Col. Sir Audley D., 

Bart., C.B., Grittleton House, 

Chippenham 
Nelson, Rt. Hon. Earl, Trafalgar, 

Salisbury 
Newall, R. S., Dean Lodge, Iron 

Acton, Bristol 
Newberry Library, Chicago, U.S.A., 

per Messrs. B. F. Stevens & Brown 

4, Trafalgar Square, W.C. 
Noel, Rev. Wyndham, Christchurch 

Vicarage, Bradford-on-Avon 
Norman, George, 12, Brock Street, 

Bath 
Normanton, Rt. Hon. Earl of, 

Somerley, Ringwood, Hants 
Northey, G. E., Cheney Court, Box, 

Chippenham 

Oakeley, Capt. E. F., The Orchards, 
Rodbourne, Malmesbury 

Oakeley, Mrs., The Orchards, Rod- 
bourne, Malmesbury 

N 2 



180 



List of Members. 



Olivier, Rev. Canon Dacres, Wilton, 
Salisbury [Winchfield 

Olivier, Rev. H. A., Shapley Hill, 
O'Shauglinessy, Rev. James, The 
Presbytery, Groundwell Road, 
Swindon [ford, Somerset 

Owen, D., Keynsham Manor, Salt- 
Oxford Agricultural and Historical 
Society, Ashmolean Museum, 
Beaumont St., Oxford 
Oxley, Selwyn, Maiden Bradley Vicar- 
age, Bath 



Palairet, H. H.,The Grange, Kington 

Langley, Chippenham 
Palmer, George LI., Lackham, 

Lacock, Wilts 
Parkinson, C. L. J. M., Easdale, 

Victoria Crescent, Eccles 
Parsons, R., Hunt's Mill Farm, 

Wootton Bassett 
Passmore, A. D., Wood Street, 

Swindon 
Peake, H. J. E., Westbrook House, 

Newbury 
Pearce, R., Langley Brewery, Chip- 
penham 
Penrose, Dr. F. G., Wick House, 

Downton, Salisbury 
Penrose, Rev. J., West Ashton 

Vicarage, Trowbridge 
Perkins, Rev. Charles E., Little 

Hiuton Rectory, Swindon 
Perkins, Mrs., Little Hinton Rectory, 

Swindou 
Phipps, C. N. P., Chalcot, Westbury 
Pile, T. A. J., 55, Holland Park 

Avenue, London, W. 
Ponting, C. E., F.S.A., Marlborough 
Poore, Major R., 17, Rosemount 

Road, Bournemouth 
Pope, Rev. E. J., Stockton Rectory, 

Codford S. Mary, Wilts 
Powell, John U., Boreham, War- 
minster 
Prescott, BE. M., 7, Upper Highlever 

Road, North Kensington, W. 
Public Record Office, Chancery Lane, 

per Messrs. Wyman & Sons, Ltd., 

Fetter Lane, E.C. 
Pye-Smith, E.F.,The Close.Salisbury 



Radcliffe, F. R. Y., 1, Mitre Court 
Buildings, Temple, London, E.C. 



Rawlence, E. A.,Newlands, Salisbury 
Reade, Rev. F. W., Rushall Rectory, 

Pewsey S.O., Wilts 
Redfern, Rev. J. Lemon, Ashley 

Rectory, Tetbury, Gloucestershire 
Richardson, H., Sigglesthorne, Marl- 
borough 
Richmond, Dr. R. T., Wilton, 

Salisbury 
Robbins, Rev. M., Holy Trinity 

Vicarage, West End, Chobham 
Rodway, E. B., Adcroft House, 

Trowbridge 
Rogers, F. E. N., M.P., Rainscombe, 

Pewsey S.O., Wilts [bridge 

Rose, G. W., 66, Fore Street, Trow- 
Ross, Rev. A. G. Gordon, St. Martin's 

Vicarage, Swindon 
Ruddle, Rev. C. S., Durrington 

Rectory, Salisbury 
Rudman, Robert E. D., Chippenham 



Sadler, John, 29, Batoum Gardens, 

West Kensington Park,London,W. 
Salisbury Public Library, Endless 

Street, Salisbury 
Salisbury, The Very Rev. The Dean 

of, The Deanery, Salisbury 
Savary, Judge A. W., Annapolis 

Royal, Nova Scotia 
Scanes, John, The School, Maiden 

Bradley, Bath 
Schomberg,Arthur,8eend,Melksham. 
Schomberg, E. C, Seend, Melksham 
Scott, H. Dudley, Erchfont Manor, 

Devizes [Chippenham 

Selmau, Jacob, Kington Langley, 
Sewell, Rev. Arthur, Sutton Veny 

Rectory, Warminster 
Shaw,F.M., Hilmarton Lodge, Calne 
Short, Rev. W. F., The Rectory, 

Donhead St. Mary, Salisbury 
Shuttleworth, Rev. W. Statkie, 5, 

De Vaux Place, Salisbury 
Sibbald, J. G. E., Mount "Pleasant, 

Norton-St.-Philip, Bath 
Simpson, Cecil, 92, Louisville Road, 

Upper Tooting, S.W. 
Simpson, G., Market Place, Devizes 
Sladeu, Rev. C. A., Alton Beruers, 

Pewsey S.O., Wilts 
Slow, Edward, Wilton, Salisbury 
Smith, H. Herbert, Buekhill, Calne 
Smith, W. F., The Green, Calne 
Soames, Rev. Gordon, Mildenhall 
Rectory, Marlborough 



List of Members. 



181 



Somerset, Her Grace the Duchess 

of, Maiden Bradley, Bath 
Somerset, His Grace the Duke of, 

Maiden Bradley, Bath 
Spicer, Captain John E. P., Spye 

Park, Chippenham 
Stancomb, W., Blount's Court, 

Potterne S.O., Wilts [bridge 

Stanley, Gerald, Sunny Croft, Trow- 
Stephenson, Miss K. J., Bodenham 

House, Salisbury [bury 

Stephens, H. C, Cholderton, Salis- 
Stephens, Rev.J. F. D., The Vicarage, 

flighworth, Swindon 
Steward, Rev. Canon, Boyton 

Rectory, Cod ford, Wilts 
Stone, E. H., Freshford, Somerset 
Stone, Robert S., 2, Ryder Street, 

St. James, S.W. 
Stone, W. J. E. Warry, 72, Elm 

Park Gardens, London, S.W. 
Stote, Rev. A. W., Holy Trinity 

Vicarage, Trowbridge 
Straton, C. R., West Lodge, Wilton, 

Salisbury 
Stratton, Alfred, Melksham [Bath 
Stratton,William, Kingston Deverill, 
Sturton, Rev. J. A., Market Laving- 

ton Vicarage, Devizes 
Swanborough, F. T., Oakwood, 

Melksham [Salisbury 

Symonds, Rev. W., Church House, 
Sykes, Rev. W. S., Wilcot Vicarage, 

Pewsey S.O., Wilts 



Talbot, C. H., Lacock Abhey Chip- 
penham 

Tatum,EdwardJ.,Solicitor,Salisbury 

Taylor, A., Ivy Lodge, Ashton St., 

, Trowbridge 

Tayler, G. C, M.D., Lovemead 
House, Trowbridge 

Tennant, Sir Edward P., Bart., 
M.P., Wilsford House, Salisbury 

Thornton, James, Conkwell Grange, 
Nr. Bath 

Thy nne.Rev. Canon, Seend, Melksham 

Tindall, Robt., Ashburn, Fording- 
bridge, Hants 

Tomkins, Rev. H. A. C, Manning- 
ford Abbas Rectory, Pewsey 

Toone, E. F., Capital & Counties 
Bank, Devizes 

Tuck, E. Newall, St. Paul's Street, 
Chippenham 

Tucker, A., Hillcote, Salisbury 



Wakeman, Herbert J., Warminster 
Wakeman, Maurice R., Warminster 
Walker, William, Longfield House, 

Trowbridge 
Walsh, Arthur H., The Manor 

House, Purton, Wilts 
Ward, Col.M.F., Upton Park.Slough 
Ward, J. E., Red Lodge, Purton, 

Wilts 
Ward, J. W., North Street, Wilton, 

Salisbury 
Warre, Rev. Canon F., Vicarage, 

Bemerton, Salisbury 
Warrender, Miss, Stoke House, 

Purton, Wilts 
Warrington, the Hon. Mr. Justice, 

Clyffe Hall, Market Lavington, 

Devizes 
Watson, Rev. J. G., St. Ebbe's, 

Oxford 
Watson - Taylor, John, United 

University Club, Pall Mall East, 

S.W. 
Watson-Taylor, G., Erlestoke Park, 

Devizes 
Watts, Canon R. R., Bemerton, 

Salisbury 
Waylen, G. S. A., Devizes 
Waylen, R. F., c/o Mr. W. F. 

Trumper, Devizes 
White, G. A. H., The Hawthorns, 

Chippenham 
Wilkins, Henry, High Street, Calne 
Wilks, Miss M. A. E., Grove House, 

Wilton Road, Salisbury 
Wills, John H., Potticks House, 

Frankleigh, Bradford -on -Avon 
Wilson, Alfred J., 3, Manor Street, 

Bridlington, Yorks 
Windley, Rev. Francis, Amesbury 

Vicarage, Salisbury 
Wood, J. Crewe, 53, Bath Road, 

Swindon 
Woodward, C. H., 4, St. John Street, 

Devizes 
Worcester, The Right Rev. the Lord 

Bishop of, Hartlebury Castle 

Kidderminster 
Wyld, Rev. C. N., Grittleton, Chip- 
penham 
W.yld, Rev. Canon Edwin G., 

Vicarage, Melksham 



Young, E. H., Lockeridge, Marl- 
borough 



182 



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her, 4, Saint John Street, Devizes. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS (Continued). 

WILTSHIRE— THE TOPOGEAPHICAL COLLECTIONS OP JOHN 
AUBREY, F.R.S., A.D. 1659-1670. Corrected and enlarged by the Rev. Canon 
J. E. Jackson, M.A., P.S. A. In 4to, Cloth, pp. 491, with 46 plates. Price £2 10s- 

WILTSHIRE INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. CHARLES I. 8vo., 
pp. vii., 501. 1901. With full index. In 8 parts, as issued. Price 13s. " 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY of the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONE HENGE and AVE BURY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, F.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations. No. 96, Dec. 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5s. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c, by 732 authors. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

A certain space on the cover of the Magazine will in future be 
available for Advertisements of Books or other kindred matters. 
For terms apply to the Kev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, 
Swindon. 



AGENTS 

FOR THE SALE OF THK 

WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



Bath R. F. Houlston, New Bond Street. 

Bristol James Fawn & Son, 18, Queen's Road. 

Galne R. Heath, Market Place. 

Chippenham R. F. Houlston, High Street. 

Devizes C. H. Woodward, Saint John Street. 

Marlborough Lucy & Co., Post Office. 

Melksham Jolliffe & Co., Bank Street. 

Oxford Jas. Parker & Co., Broad Street. 

Salisbury Brown & Co., Canal. 

Trowbridge G. W. Rose, 66, Fore Street. 

Warminster A. H. Coates, Market Place. 



The Tropenell Cartulary. 

This very important genealogical and topographical work 
in 2 vols., 8vo., pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds 
connected with property in many Wiltshire parishes of the 
14th & 15th centuries, has recently been published by the 
Society, and issued to subscribers. Only 150 copies were 
printed of which a few are left. Price to members, £1 10s. 
and to non-members £2. Apply to Mr. D. Owen, Bank 
Chambers, Devizes. 



Wiltshire Books. 

Autbors and Publishers of Books, Pamphlets, and Articles, 
on any subject connected with the County of Wilts, or written by 
Wiltshire Authors, are asked to send copies of their works for the 
Society's Library to the Librarian, 

Kev. E. H. Goddard, 

Clyffe Vicarage, 

Swindon. 



FOR SALE.-A COMPLETE SET OF THE WILTS AECH. MAG. 
Bound half-calf extra. "What offers ? 

Back Numbers of Wilts Arch. Mag. to make up sets can be had. 

A VP ly . — C. H. WOODWARD, 

Printer and Publisher, Devizes. 

BOOKBINDING.— The Archaeological Magazine carefully hound to 
pattern. Estimates given. 

£ s. d. 
PITT-RIVERS' EXCAVATIONS IN BOKERLY AND WANS- 
DYKE. Vol. III. of complete series ... ... 15 

Vol IV. of above, CRANBORNE CHASE ... ... 15 

STUKELEY'S STONEHENGE and AVEBURY, two vols, in one 1 10 

HOARE'S ANCIENT WILTS, part relating to Wily, Ames- 
bury, and Stonehenge ... ... ... ... 1 15 

BRITTON'S MEMOIR OF AUBREY... ... .... 3 6 

WILTS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MAGAZINE, complete set in parts 10 10 

HOARE'S ANCIENT WILTS, two vols., half-calf, clean good 

copy ... ... ... ... ... 7 15 

HOARE'S ANCIENT WILTS, parts I. and II. bound together, 
relating to Stourton, AVarminster, Heytesbury, Wily, 
Amesbury, and Stonehenge ... ... ... 250 

H. Passmore, Wood Street, Swindon. 

C. H. WOODWARD, MACHINE PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



No. CXII. 



DECEMBER, 1909. Vol. XXXVI. 




THE 



28 °V 1938 

WILTSHIRE 

IrrjjiiHiiflgiral nntt Natural listortj 

MAGAZINE, 

Pufclts'ljrti un&cr ttjc SBtrrrttau 

OF THE 

SOCIETY FOBMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 18 5 3. 



EDITED BT 

REV. E. H. GODDARD, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 




DEVIZES : 

Printed and sold foe the Society by C. H. Woodward, 

4, St. John Street. 



Price 5s. 6d, Members, Gratis. 
Wilts Inquisitiones Post Mortem, Edward III., Part I., issued with 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS. 

TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols, 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr. David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should be addressed. 

The Numbers of this Magazine will be delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Subscrip- 
tions, but in accordance with Byelaw No. 8 " The Financial 
Secretary shall give notice to Members in arrear, and the 
Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
taries: the Bev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, 
and E. O. P. Bouverie, Esq., F.S.A., The Old House, Market 
Lavington, Wilts. 

THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN, Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

TEE BRITISH AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A. C. Smith, M.A. One Volume, Atlas 
4to, 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2*. 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 lis. Qd. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIRE. One Volume, 8vo., 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev. T A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 16s. ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price. 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHE AD COLLECTION OF ANTIQUITIES 
in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, wth 175 Illustrations. Price Is. 6d. 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. 
Price 1*. APPENDIX No. I., II., and III., 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and MAPS in the SOCIETY'S 
LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. Price 2s. 

CATALOGUE of WILTSHIRE TRADE TOKENS in the SOCIETY'S 
COLLECTION. Price 6d. 

BACK NUMBERS of the MAGAZINE. Price to the Public, 5s. 6d. and 
3s. Qd. (except in the case of a few Numbers, the price of which is raised). 
Members are allowed a reduction of 25 per cent, from these prices. 

STONEHENGE AND ITS BARROWS, by W. Long— Nos. 46-7 of the 
Magazine in separate wrapper, 7s. 6d. This still remains the best and most 
reliable account of Stonehenge and its Earthworks. 



WILTSHIRE 

IrtljtPiilo'giral anit lateral 
MAGAZINE. 



No. CXII. DECEMBEE, 1909. Vol. XXXVI. 



Contents. page 

The Fifty-Sixth General Meeting at Bbadford-on-Avon 185 

"Javelins" and "Javelin Men": By B. Howard Cunnington, 

F.S.A. Scot 199 

Presidential Address by Dr. J. Beddoe, LL.D., F.B.S., at the 

Bradford-on-Avon Meeting, June 29th, 1909 202 

The Nokman Tympanum of Little Langford Church: By J. U. 

Powell 207 

The Society's MSS. — Quidhampton (continued) 213 

Malmksbury Election Petition, 1807 : By E. O. P. Bouverie, F.S.A. 292 
The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lanhill, 

near Chippenham: By Maud E. Cunnington 300 

Notes on Barrows on King's Play Down, Heddington : By 

Maud E. Cunnington 311 

Notes on the Parish Church and Saxon Church, Bradford-on- 

Avon: By A. W. N. Burder, F.S.A 318 

Notes on some Wiltshire Merchants' Marks: By T. H. Baker 324 

The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum 329 

Wilts Obituary 337 

Becent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c 340 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 353 

Wiltshire Illustrations and Pictures 356 

Wiltshire Portraits 357 

Additions to Museum and Library 358 

ILLUSTBATIONS. 
Mural Painting formerly existing over the Chancel 

Arch, Winterslow Church.... , 185 

Facsimile of Beceipt for rent due to the Duchy of 

Lancaster from Salthrop 234 

Lanhill Long Barrow — Entrance to chamber as 

excavated 1909 300 

„ „ „ Plan of Chamber 301 

„ „ „ Interior of chamber (2) ... 302 

„ „ „ Entrance to chamber with 

roofrestored 307 

Painted Panels of the Bood Screen of the Parish 

Church, Bradford-on-Avon 320 

Fragment of Becumbent Effigy, Parish Church, 

Bradford-on-Avon 321 

Wiltshire and other Merchants' Marks (3 Plates) 326—328 

DEVIZES : C. H. Woodward, 4, Saint John Street. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



! MULT0BUM MANIBUS GRANDE LEVATUE ONUS." — Ovid. 



December, 1909. 



NOTICE TO BINDER. 



■:o:- 



This plate should be inserted to face p. 19 of the present 
Volume. 



if Members were present. 

The President opened the proceedings by calling on Mr. E. 0. P. 
50UVERIE, F.S.A. to read the 

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1908-9, PRESENTED JUNE 29th, 1909. 

" The Committee begs to present the fifty-sixth annual report 
f the Society. 



1 The best and fullest accounts of the Meeting and of the places visited 
'ere those given by the Devises Gazette, July 1st, 8th, and 15th, and the 
Viltshire Times, July 3rd, with six illustrations. 

OL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. 







X 

u 

- - 



fc -s 




III ; ; Sa®\ 




THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



"multobum manibus grande levatub onus." — Ovid. 

December, 1909. 

THE FIFTY-SIXTH GENERAL MEETING 

OF 

THE WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL 
HISTORY SOCIETY, 
HELD AT BRADFORD-ON-AVON, 

June Wth, 30th, and July 1st, 1909} 

John Beddoe, Esq., LL.D., F.R.S., President of the Society, 

In the Chair. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 29th. 

The Annual General Meeting of the Society was held at the 
Swan Hotel, at 2 p.m., the President of the Society, DR. J. 
5EDDOE, F.R.S., being in the chair. A considerable number 
f Members were present. 

The President opened the proceedings by calling on Mr. E. 0. P. 
iJOUVERIE, F.S.A. to read the 

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1908-9, PRESENTED JUNE 29th, 1909. 

" The Committee begs to present the fifty-sixth annual report 
f the Society. 

1 The best and fullest accounts of the Meeting and of the places visited 
ere those given by the Devizes Gazette, July 1st, 8th, and 15th, and the 
W~iltshire Times, July 3rd, with six illustrations. 

JOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. 



186 The Fifty-Sixth General Meeting. 

" Finance. — The detailed accounts which appear in the current 
number of the Magazine show that on the general account, at the 
close of the financial year, there was a credit balance of £35 2s. b^d., 
as against a credit balance of £50 18s. at the close of 1907. The 
financial result of the Salisbury Meeting last year was that 
£3 6s. Id. was handed over to the Society. 

"Members. — The number of Members on the books in June 
1909, was 16 Life Members and 365 Annual Subscribers, a total 
of 381, against 400 in June of last year, with 24 societies and 
institutions, with whom publications are exchanged. There have 
been 10 lapses by death, and 41 new Members have joined the 
Society. We regret to have to report that a number of Members 
had fallen into arrears with their subscriptions, in some cases for 
several years. The Committee is much indebted to Mr. Cunnington, 
who undertook to write to these Members, and as a result 
of the correspondence ^ considerable amount of arrears 
was paid, while on the other hand some members resigned 
and some were struck off the list of the Society, it being impossible 
to trace them. Thus, in spite of a large addition of new Members 
during the year, the total number appearing on the Society's list 
is less by nineteen than it was a year ago. It is much to be hoped 
that in the future Members will not allow their subscriptions to 
get into arrears (a banker's order to pay such can be obtained 
from the Financial Secretary). It is to be remembered that under 
the rules of the Society the Magazines are issued only to those who 
have paid their subscriptions for the year. 

" Museum. — The number of visitors to the Museum during the 
year, exclusive of Members, was 642 and 42 from classes in neigh- 
bouring schools, against 897 of the preceding year, but these latter 
figures included 151 from schools, and also on each occasion 
on which they met the Members of the Devizes Field Club, which 
club is allowed the use of the Museum for their meetings. In the 
figures of this year the Field Club Members, who accounted for 
about 100 of the figures of the preceding year, are not included. 
Mrs. Willis, the caretaker recently appointed, now resides on 
the premises, and has satisfactorily carried out her duties. 



The Report. 187 

"Enlargement. — The enlargement by throwing into the Museum 
the two ground-floor rooms has provided much needed extra space 
for the display of the exhibits, and the rooms are well lighted by 
the windows. The cost of these alterations and the cases and 
fittings has been £110 7s. 9d., being £35 16s. 4d. for cases, etc., 
and £74 lis. 5d. on account of structural work. The latter sum 
was larger than the original estimate, owing to the fact that the 
joists of the floor of the added rooms were found to be unsafe, 
having regard to the weight that they would have to bear. The 
Society is greatly indebted to the Curator and Mrs. Cunnington 
for what has practically been an entire re-arrangement of the 
archaeological portion of the Museum. 

" It may be remembered that Mr. W. Heward Bell, when the 
alterations and additions were first taken in hand, kindly advanced 
£200 to the Society without interest. Of this advance £150 has 
been repaid to him, and the balance of £50 is now the sole out- 
standing debt of the Society. In last year's report we stated that 
a sum of £50 had been borrowed from the Life Membership Fund, 
to be repaid by the Museum Enlargement Fund. This was an 
error, as the money was provided from the General Fund. This 
sum will be gradually repaid from the Museum Enlargement Fund, 
the rent of the house being credited to the latter fund. 

"Excavations. — The work at Avebury, begun last year under the 
.auspices of the Committee of the British Association, has been 
continued this spring by Mr. H. St. G. Gray. As, however, the 
grants made by the British Association and the Society of 
Antiquaries were insufficient, an appeal was made by the Hon. 
•Secretaries to several Members of our Society, and a sum of £14 4s. 
was given by six members, to be regarded as the Society's contri- 
bution towards the work. The principal result of this year's work, 
ef which a report will appear in due time, has been the discovery 
of the original entrance causeway on the Kennett side. Mr. Gray 
has kindly consented to lecture to our Society on the subject at 
the Bradford Meeting. It is hoped, too, that the objects found in 
the excavations will eventually be placed in the Society's Museum. 

" Of other such work in the county, Mr. and Mrs. Cunnington 

o 2 



188 The Fifty -Sixth General Meeting. 

have continued the excavation of the curious camp at Knapp Hill, 
which they began last year. A full account of their work will 
appear in due time in the Magazine. Sir Charles Hobhouse has- 
also continued the work of uncovering the remains of the monastic 
Church at Monk ton Farleigh. Largely in consequence of a resolu- 
tion passed during the Meeting of our Society at Salisbury last 
year, the attention of the Society of Antiquaries has been drawn 
to the desirability of a systematic excavation of Old Sarum. The 
Committee has expressed the desire of our Society to further this 
important work, and to co-operate with the Society of Antiquaries 
in every way. No definite statement can yet be made, 1 but ne- 
gotiations are at present proceeding between the Society of 
Antiquaries and the owners and occupier of the site, and these, 
if successful, may result in some preliminary work being begun 
there this autumn. The work of excavation, once started, wilt 
probably extend over many years. 

" The White Barrovj at Tilshead. — It is a satisfaction to be able 
to report that this important Long Barrow has become the property 
of the National Trust, largely through the generosity of Mrs. 
Cunnington. 

"The attention of your Committee has been directed to the 
possible danger to ancient monuments from the acquisition of land 
by public authorities for those practical purposes for which land 
may now be acquired. They have every reason to hope that the 
County Council will respect the archaeological interest of such 
land, and they trust they may reckon on the co-operation of other 
public bodies and of the Members of our Society in this object. 
Your Committee have been in communication with the Society of 
Antiquaries with regard to the preservation of monuments on land 
acquired or to be acquired by the War Office on Salisbury Plain, 
and they hope that no damage will be done by the military 
operations to the barrows and earthworks which are numerous in 
this area. 

" Deaths of Members. — The death of the Rev. J. Silvester Davies- 
removes a Member who, though not resident in the county, had 

1 See below, p. 190. 



The Report. 189 

deserved well of the Society for his arduous work in transcribing 
-and editing the Tropenell Cartulary, published by the Society a 
year ago. Mr. G. E. Dartnell had also done good work for us in past 
years, and to Mr. Jerome Harrison the Society was indebted for the 
valuable " Bibliography of Stonehenge and Avebury," printed in 
1901. We have to regret the untimely death of Captain Ambrose 
Awdry, E.A., who was a Life Member, and took a keen interest in 
the Society. 

" The Museum. — The excellent wall case provided from the 
Museum Maintenance Fund, allows of the adequate exhibition, for 
the first time in the new room, of the valuable collection of Eoman 
pottery and other relics from Westbury, as well as of Roman objects 
from other sites. 

" The Society is indebted to Mr. Cunnington for the gift of a 
wall case in the Stourhead Room, and to the Rev. H. G 0. Kendall 
for kindly undertaking the arrangement of the collection of 
Palaeolithic flint implements. "We have to thank Mr. Walter Eales 
for many contributions of Wiltshire Lepidoptera to the Society's 
collection during the last three years. 

" The Library has received a number of gifts during the year, the 
most important of which has been a second consignment of two 
hundred and forty-five old deeds connected with Wiltshire, 
from Mr. C. C. Bradford. Valuable gifts have also been received 
from Mr. A. Schomberg, Mr. H. W. and Miss Dartnell, and Mr. 
H. Bevir. The Rev. E. H. Goddard has been appointed Librarian 
in the room of the Rev. E. J. Bodington, who has resigned. 

" The Museum Maintenance Fund„which has again proved of the 
greatest service, is now supported by eighty annual subscribers of 
sums varying from 5s. to £2, and produces about £36 a year. It 
is greatly to be desired that more Members should become sub- 
scribers to this fund, so as to raise it to at least £50 a year. 

" Wiltshire Parish Registers. The Committee regrets to report 
that the Wiltshire Parish Registers series may be discontinued, 
owing to the dearth of regular subscribers. This valuable work 
has now been issued for some years by Messrs. Phillimore & Co., 
of 124, Chancery Lane, W.C., at the price of 10s. 6d. per volume. 



190 The Fifty-Sixth General Meeting. 

The work of transcribing and editing this publication has been 
almost entirely a labour of love, and the Committee suggests to 
Members of the Society and all who are interested in the records- 
of the county the desirability of supporting the work by subscribing 
regularly for the volumes as issued. At present the volumes have 
dealt only with the Marriage registers, but it is intended to include 
Baptisms and Burials if sufficient support should be obtained to 
justify the continuance of the work. 

" The Magazine. Volume xxxv., with full index, was completed 
in the number for December, 1908, when the concluding part of 
the second volume of the Wiltshire " Inquisitiones Post Mortem,"' 
with an index, was also issued to Members. This series will be 
continued at the same rate as in former years, by the issue of one 
part annually to Members. 

" Edward H. Goddard, \Hon. 
"Edward 0. P. Bouverie, {Sees. 
"June, 1909." 

THE KEV. F. H. MANLEY spoke strongly in favour of a larger 
support for the Wiltshire Parish Begister series. He hoped that 
many who had not hitherto purchased the volumes would become 
subscribers. Wiltshire would be failing in its duty if it did not 
support the work. MR. E. 0. P. BOUVERIE also dwelt on the 
fact that the printing of the Parish Begisters, instead of diminishing J 
the demand for certified copies of entries, as it was sometimes said J 
it would, was found by experience to have actually increased that | 
demand. 

THE REV. E. H. GODDARD, with reference to Old Sarum, said 
that since the report was drawn up, matters had so advanced that 
it was necessary for the Society to take some practical steps that 
day. At present the position was this : — An agreement had been 
drawn up between the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury, the 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners (who were also interested), and the 
Society of Antiquaries, which would allow the Society to carry out 
during the next few years such excavations on the site as they 
might deem advisable. In order to do that a very considerable sum 
would be required, probably £300 a year for several years. That 



The Annual General Meeting. 191 

sum could not be got in Wiltshire itself, but as the excavations at 
Old Sarum would to some extent take the place of those at 
Silchester — now completed — it was hoped that many of those 
who had subscribed to the former Work would continue their 
subscriptions for Old Sarum. What the Wiltshire Archaeological 
Society had to do that day was to appoint a Local Committee for 
the county — not necessarily Members of the Society — who should 
co-operate with the representatives appointed by the Dean and 
Chapter, and with the delegates of the Society of Antiquaries, in 
whose hands the actual carrying out of the work would be for the 
most part left, in raising funds and in other ways helping on the 
work. If all went well the foundations of the Norman castle 
might be laid bare this September. 

The adoption of the Eeport was moved by MR. W. HEWAED 
BELL, F.S.A., and seconded by MR. R. STONE, the former dwelling 
on the fact that, in the long line of Presidents of the Society, none 
could be found more distinguished than the President for 1909, 
DR. BEDDOE. 

The Committee, with the addition of THE REV. F. H. MANLEY, 
as Local Secretary for the Malmesbury district, the Hon. Secretaries, 
Curator, and other Officers of the Society, were then duly re-ap- 
pointed, a special tribute being paid by MR. W. HEWARD BELL 
to the good work done at the Museum by MR. AND MRS. 
CUNNINGTON. 

THE REV. E. P. KNUBLEY then rose to move the appointment 
of the Local Committee for the Excavation of Old Sarum, as 
follows:— DR. J. BEDDOE, F.R.S. (President of the Wilts Arch. Soc). 
THE EARL OF PEMBROKE, LORD FITZMAURICE, THE BISHOP 
OF BRISTOL, SIR E. TENNANT, BART., M.P., H. E. MEDLICOTT. 
W.HEWARD BELL.F.S.A., MRS. CUNNINGTON, E. 0. P. BOUVERIE, 
F.S.A., DR. H. P. BLACKMORE, REV. W. SYMONDS, and COL. 
HAWLEY, F.S.A., 1 in addition to the three gentlemen who act as 
Local Secretaries of the Society of Antiquaries for the County of 

1 As Col. Hawley is one of the delegates appointed by the Society of 
Antiquaries (the other two being Messrs. W. H. St. John Hope and Mill 
Stephenson, F.S.A., his place on the Local Committee is vacant. 



192 The Fifty -Sixth General Meeting. 

Wilts, who were also appointed on the Committee : — THE EEV. 
G. H. ENGLEHEART, F.S.A., H. BRAKSPEAR, F.S.A., and THE 
REV. E. H. GODDARD. The proposition was seconded by MR. R. 
STONE, and the Committee was appointed. 

During the General Meeting there had been a smart thunder 
shower, but it ceased in time to allow the company to proceed to the 
Parish Church, and though rain threatened during the rest of the 
afternoon it did not really interfere at all with the carrying out of the 
appointed programme. At thePARISH CHURCH.where about seventy 
Members and their friends assembled, MR. A. W. N. BURDER, F.S.A., 
read notes on the history and architecture of the building, as he 
did also at the adjoining SAXON CHURCH, which was the next 
point to be visited. "THE PRIORY," was then visited, and by 
the kindness of MRS. COLLETT, the owner, the company were 
allowed to wander over the house, and see the various points of 
interest, the staircase, plaster ceilings, &c. Here DR. BEDDOE 
spoke on the history of the house, which was formerly known as 
" Methuens," and was the home of the Methuen Family. It never 
had anything to do with any monastic institution, and the origin 
of its present name, " The Priory," is to be found only in the 
caprice of a late occupier. 

From this point the company walked down over the TOWN 
BRIDGE noticing THE CHAPEL, afterwards a lock-up, corbelled 
out from one of its piers,and on to the GREAT TITHE BARN, which 
was explained by Mr. Burder. After this a short walk across the 
fields and over the ancient bridge lower down brought the party to 
THE CHANTRY, where DR. AND MRS. BEDDOE most kindly 
provided tea. Here the curious bath, or tank, in one of the base- 
ment rooms, as to the age of which nothing is known, was inspected. 
After this a visit to THE HALL, where the owner, MR. MOULTON, 
shortly described the house and its history, brought the afternoon's 
programme to a close. Here again a storm fell conveniently 
whilst the Members were admiring the interior of the house. 

At THE ANNIVERSARY DINNER, which was held at 7.30 at 
the " Swan " Hotel, twenty-eight Members sat down, after which 
the party adjourned in much increased numbers to the Town Hall 



Wednesday, June 30th. 193 

opposite, where, when the proceedings of the CONVERSAZIONE 
began, some seventy-five persons were present, who were greatly 
interested in the large LOCAL MUSEUM of all manner of curi- 
osities and antiquities which had been got together by the Local 
Committee, and which completely filled the smaller room at the 
Town Hall. This Museum was thrown open next day to the public 
on payment of a nominal entrance fee, and was visited by a con- 
siderable number of people. 

The first paper of the evening was THE PRESIDENT'S ADDEESS, 
which will be found at a later page of this Magazine. This was 
followed by a paper by MISS DRYDEN, illustrated by a number 
of excellent lantern slides, on " EMBLEMS OF SPORT ON SEPUL- 
CHRAL MONUMENTS." The subject is a curious and interesting 
one, which has not previously been explored, and Miss Dryden 
dealt with it authoritatively. 

The proceedings were brought to a close by the President calling 
upon MR. B. H. CUNNINGTON, F.S.A. Scot., to say a few words 
on the excavation of a sideohamber in the long barrow at LANHILL, 
in Chippenham parish, which he had carried out a few days before. 
This took the place of the description of the places to be visited 
next day, these latter being sufficiently described already in the 
admirable Programme and Notes compiled by Mr. BURDER for the 
use of the Meeting. 

The music during the evening was provided by the kindness of 
THE MISSES APPLEGARTH. 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30th. 

For the first time in the history of the Society, horse-drawn 
vehicles were dispensed with on its Excursions. Instead of the 
familiar breaks, two large motor busses had been chartered from 
Bath, and these, supplemented by a considerable number of private 
motors and a few carriages, conveyed the large party with much 
less loss of time than usual, from one point to another. The only 
drawback was that those who rode on the outside of the public 



194 The Fifty -Sixth General Meeting. 

conveyances had rather an exciting time in dodging the branches 
of trees in some of the narrow lanes, where motor busses are as 
yet a novelty. 

GREAT CHALFIELD was reached at 10 o'clock, and here an 
hour was allowed for the leisurely inspection of the charming 
group of buildings, THE CHURCH AND THE MANOR HOUSE. 
The latter has been for the last two or three years in the hands of 
MR. H. BRAKSPEAR, F.S.A., who is restoring the building in the 
most careful and conservative fashion for its owner, MR. R. F. 
FULLER. The latter was present to receive the Society, and took 
every care that everything of interest should be seen. MR. 
BRAKSPEAR spoke on the history of the house and Church, and 
called attention to the many points of interest in the former. 
Before leaving, MR. W. HEWARD BELL, in thanking Mr. Fuller 
on behalf of the Society, expressed the very great satisfaction that 
all lovers of ancient buildings must feel in the fact that this house 
— one of the most valuable examples of the domestic architecture 
of its period to be found in England — should have, none too soon 
for its preservation, fallen into such excellent hands as Mr. Fuller's 
and Mr. Brakspear's. When the work is complete — and it is far 
from that at present — this beautiful building which has been 
occupied as a farmhouse for a long series of years, with its tine 
hall cut up into small rooms, and some of its most notable features 
in imminent danger of collapse, will once more take its rightful 
place amongst the residences of Wiltshire without any loss of its 
ancient characteristics. 

The procession of motors next made their way to the curious 
little wayside hospice of CHAPEL PLAISTER, where THE REV. 
E. H. GODDARD pointed out the features of the building, 1 and 
then returned to SOUTH WRAXALL CHURCH, where the Vicar 
THE REV. J. H. ELLABY, gave some account of the building, 
with its interesting Long tombs and curious saddle-back roof to 
the tower. 

At SOUTH WRAXALL MANOR, where MR. E. RICHARDSON COX 

1 See full account, Wilts Arch. Mag., xxviii., 332. 



Wednesday, June 30th. 195 

had most generously invited the Members to lunch, the party 
numbered seventy-eight. Here the house was thrown open, and 
Members wandered over it as they would, luncheon was laid on the 
lawn, and the roses on the terrace, just at their best, gave an 
added charm to the wonderful old house. Two hours had been 
allowed for the stay here, and the time proved none too long, for 
the charm of the place was on all the party, and no more enjoyable 
hours than those have been spent by the Society on any of its 
excursions. In thanking ME. KICHAEDSON COX for his kindness 
and hospitality, MR. W. HEWARD BELL took occasion to express 
the opinion that a house of this kind gained enormously in interest 
from the fact that it was again inhabited as a residence and filled 
with beautiful and fitting furniture, and that Mr. Eichardson Cox,, 
who had spent so much upon the place in recent years, had made 
as few alterations in the ancient structure as it was possible for 
anyone to make, in view of the necessities of a modern dwelling 
house. Certain of the modern alterations, such as the bow window 
beside the gatehouse, which had been much criticised, were not 
due to Mr. Eichardson Cox at all. Mr. Eichardson Cox, in reply, 
said he had been accused of ruining the house ; he left it to the 
judgment of the Society whether he had done so or not. The 
well-known antiquary, the Eev. J. C. Cox, LL.D., F.S.A., was to 
have addressed the party on the architecture of the house ; he was, 
however, prevented by domestic bereavement from being present, 
and MR. A. W. N. BURDER, F.S.A., gave a short account of the 
building in his place. 

JAGGARDS HOUSE was the next place on the programme, and 
here, in the absence of MR. J. M. F. FULLER, M.P., his brother, 
MR. R. F. FULLER, again received the Members, and MR. BURDER 
said a few words on the history of the house, the chief attraction 
of the interior being a panelled room with a stone mantelpiece, and 
the initials E. K. supposed to be those of Richard Kington, and the 
date 1657. In the grounds is a large square dovecot, with the pigeon 
holes, 700 or 800 in number, still extending down to the ground 
in the interior. The name " Jaggards " is said to be a corruption 
of the family name " Jacquard." 



196 The Fifty-Sixth General Meeting. 

At DITTERIDGE CHURCH,' the next stopping place, THE REV. 
E. H. GODDARD pointed out the principal points of interest. 
Mr. E. W. Godwin, who described the building in 1857, regarded 
the south door as being Early Norman work of the end of the 
11th century, perhaps dr. 1197, but it was stated that the Bishop 
of Bristol, during a recent visit to the Church, had inclined to the 
belief that it might be work of the days immediately preceding 
the Conquest, and that the heads on the side of the imposts might 
be those of Edward Confessor and Edith, his Queen. 
. From this point the party walked to the neighbouring CHENEY 
COURT, where tea had been most kindly provided for them by 
MR. AND MRS. GEORGE NORTHEY, the former of whom spoke 
shortly on the history of the house. The house, which commands 
a lovely view over the valley, is believed to have been built by the 
Speke family, who settled at Haselbury House in 1613, and were 
lords of the manor of Box. The Speke arms are on a chimney 
/ piece on the ground floor, and those of Speke impaling Luttrell in 
a room above. The house until recently was divided between a 
residence and a farmhouse. It has now been again thrown into 
one. The old staircase has a " dog gate," and there is a good late 
17th century chimneypiece in a room upstairs. 

On the way back to Bradford the journey was broken at 
WOOLLEY GRANGE, where, by the kindness of MR. AND MRS. 
P. K. STOTHERT, the picturesque front of the house and charming 
gardens filled with lovely roses and many other choice things to 
rouse a gardener's envy and admiration, were inspected and en- 
joyed. So ended one of the most delightful days ever spent on 
the Society's excursions. 

At the Evening Meeting when there was again a good attendance, 
some sixty-two being present, THE REV. E. H. GODDARD 
spoke shortly on " THE BRONZE IMPLEMENTS OF WILTSHIRE," 
and was followed by H. ST. GEORGE GRAY, who read a paper on 
"THE AVEBURY EXCAVATIONS, 1908-9," illustrated by a large 
series of excellent lantern slides, showing every stage of the work 

1 For full account see Wilts Arch. Mag., iv., 146. 






Thursday, July 31st. 197 

carried out there daring the last two years. The President having 
thanked Mr. Gray for his paper, THE REV. E. P. KNUBLEY 
proposed a vote of thanks to the Local Committee, and more 
especially to the Local Secretaries, MR. A. W. N. BURDER, F.S.A., 
and MR. TREVOR WHEELER, to whom the Society was very 
greatly indebted for the enormous amount of labour tliey had 
spent over the arrangements. Things throughout the Meeting had 
gone absolutely without a hitch of any kind, a result which could 
only be obtained by exceeding care and attention to detail on the 
part of those who made the arrangements. THE REV. H. H. MOGG 
having seconded, the vote of thanks was heartily accorded. 






THURSDAY, JULY 1st. 



Advantage was taken of the fact that the Society was meeting 

on the borders of the county and of the convenient railway 

accommodation, to spend a day in seeing some of the less well 

known sights of BRISTOL. The Society was extremely fortunate in 

finding in MR. J. E. PRITCHARD, F.S.A., one who not only has 

the antiquities of Bristol at his fingers' ends but was willing to 

give a large amount of time and trouble to the organising of an 

| excursion for a Society which had no sort of claim upon him. 

Indeed it is safe to say that the Society has never been treated 

i better in its own county than it was treated by Mr. Pritchard 

i and those whose help he bespoke for it, when it invaded the foreign 

; territory of Bristol. Three breaks met the train at Bristol at 10.4, 

and in them, between that hour and 5.28, when they brought the 

party back to the station again, owing to the very careful and 

exact way in which the route had been mapped out and timed, 

j as much of the City of Bristol was seen as it was possible to see 

in one day. It was seen too, in comfort, without hurry or delay, 

and exactly according to the time table of the programme. Be- 

; ginning with the Church of ST. MARY REDCLYFFE, which was 

I described by DR. HARDY, and passing on by the curious old 

i HERMITAGE, in the Friend's Burial Ground, and CANYNGES 

HOUSE, the Council House was reached, where the magnificent 



198 The Fifty -Sixth General Meeting. 

series of state swords, maces, chains, badges, and the silver oar 
belonging to the City Corporation was most courteously exhibited 
and explained by the City Treasurer. Then followed lunch at the 
Eoyal Hotel, at which thirty Members were present. MR. BURDER 
took this opportunity of expressing the hearty thanks of the Society 
to MR. PRITCHARD for all he had done for it, and the REV. E. P. 
KNUBLEY said kind things about the work done during the year 
by THE REV. E. H. GODDARD, as Hon. Secretary and Editor of 
the Magazine. The party then resumed its journeyings through 
the city, to RED LODGE, with its singularly unpromising exterior 
and its magnificent 16th century woodwork, and panelling, and 
chimneypieces, and ceilings within ; to the 13th century archway, 
which forms the sole remnant of ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S HOSPITAL; 
to ST. JOHN'S CHURCH and its crypt and fine Church plate ; to 
ST. PETER'S HOSPITAL, with its grand half-timbered front and 
splendid court room within, where MR. AND MRS. SIMPSON 
most kindly entertained the party at tea ; to the scanty 13th 
century remains of THE CASTLE, past the curious Norman front 
of ST. JAMES'S CHURCH, and several of the best remaining 
specimens of 17th century houses, once so numerous in the streets, 
but now yearly becoming scarcer; and lastly to the TEMPLE 
CHURCH, with its fine leaning tower, its 17th century woodwork, 
its fine iron screens of 1726, its 14th century brass candelabrum, 
and its fine Church plate. 

Altogether the Meeting has been a notable one, the weather on 
the two days of the Excursions was perfect, the arrangements on 
both days were perfect too, and everybody said good-bye, pleased 
with themselves and with things in general, and hoping that next 
year's Meeting may be as successful as that of Bradford-on-Avon 
in 1909 has certainly been. 



199 



"JAVELINS" AND "JAVELIN MEN." 
By B. Howard Cunnington, F.S.A. Scot. 

In the Museum of the Wilts Archaeological and Natural History 
Society at Devizes is to be seen a collection of javelins — sixteen 
in number — the use of which in the early part and middle of the 
nineteenth century is almost forgotten. These javelins vary in 
length from four feet four inches to six feet ten inches in length, 
and comprise an iron leaf-shaped lance head about eight and a 
half inches long mounted on an ovoid knob of wood four and a 
half inches in length into which wooden staves or handles are 
inserted. The ovoid knobs are surrounded at their base with a 
heavy twisted fringe of red tassels. The staves or handles are 
painted light green and blue. 

These javelins were carried by " javelin men " who were dressed 
in uniform and paid by the High Sheriff to act as a body guard 
or escort to the judges of assizes as they passed through the 
streets of the town. 

I have not been able to find out when javelin men were first 
instituted or their origin, but in Charles II.'s reign an act was 
passed relieving the High Sheriff of the necessity of supplying 
more than forty, and Mr. Darby Griffith, a former member of 
Parliament for Devizes, made many attempts to get a Bill 
passed to do away with them altogether. It was not however 
until the passing of the Police Acts, about 1859, that he saw 
his chance of getting this done, when he got a clause 
inserted, authorising the High Sheriffs to have the services of the 
constables to act as escort and so relieve them of the heavy 
expense of having to equip and furnish javelin men at their own 
cost. This meant a great saving, as the High Sheriff had not only 
to clothe them in uniform and pay them at the rate of five 



200 "Javelins" and "Javelin Men." 

shillings a day, but he had also to maintain them during the 
Assizes and pay the cost of conveying them from Devizes to the 
towns where the Assizes were held and back again when they 
were over. 

There are still a few persons living in Devizes who can 
remember the Javelin men, and they tell me it was an imposing 
sight when the judge in the High Sheriff's coach proceeded from 
the judge's house in Sidmonth Street (now known as Handel 
House) to the Assize Courts escorted by Captain Birch some 
yards in front of the coach and jnst behind him were H. George* 
trumpeter, on one side, and G. Andrews, trumpeter, on the other 
side. Then came the High Sheriffs coach, and equally divided — 
eight on each side of it were — 

E. Eutter, javelin man (sexton of St. Mary's Church. 

E. Logdon ,, „ (sexton of St. James's Church). 
Gr. Cole ,, „ (carpenter). 

F. Bristowe „ „ „ 
W. Eutter „ 

Jas. Mullings „ ,, (basket maker) 

John Mullings „ „ „ 

J. Coleman „ „ (bootmaker). 

J. Coleman „ „ (dairyman) . 

G. Fowles „ „ (gardener). 
T. Fennel „ 

T. Hunter „ „ „ 

J. Long ,, ,, (landlord of the Eising Sun Inn). 

J. Dyke „ „ (sawyer). 

G. Odey 

J. Noyes „ „ (bootmaker) . 
The above are the names and occupations of the last javelin 
men in Devizes ; and of the whole number — as far as I can 
ascertain — only one is now (March, 1909,) alive, viz., E. Eutter, 
who, aged 82, is living at Oare. 1 



1 Since the above was written it has been discovered that E. Eutter has 
removed to Wootton Rivers ; also that Jas. Mullings, now living in Devizes 
(August, 1909), has acted as deputy for his father and uncle, when the latter 
were unable to attend. 






By B. Howard Cunnington, F.S.A. Scot. ■ 201 

They were the javelin men when Mr. 11. P. Nisbet, of South- 
broom House, Devizes, was High Sheriff. 

There existed a sort of " High Sheriffs " Society, composed of 
gentlemen of the county who were likely to be called upon to fill 
the office, each member of which subscribed to a fund to keep up 
the uniform, javelins, &c, which the members of the society had 
the use of in turn, as they were called upon to take office. 

Mr. E. P. Nisbet, however, did not belong to this society, so 
when he was pricked for High Sheriff he had to purchase all the 
necessaries for the office. His javelin men wore drab trousers and 
coat, with red waistcoats, and high silk hats with a gold band 
round them. 

• At the end of his year of office the uniforms, &c, were handed 
back to him and for a long time were hung in the hall at South- 
broom House. 

When Mr. Watson Taylor was High Sheriff the men were 
dressed in plum coloured clothes, with silver buttons engraved 
with his crest and a silver band round the hat. 

The javelin men were appointed for life or until unable to carry 
out the duties, and when a vacancy occurred there was always a 
large number of applicants eager to fill the post, and the lucky 
man who got the appointment was envied by all his friends. 

In Hogarth's pictures of the " Idle and Industrious Apprentices," 
Thomas Idle is to be seen escorted to the gallows by a band of 
mounted javelin men. 



|VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. 



202 






PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS by DR. J. BEDDOE, LL.D., F.E.S. 
AT THE BRADFORD-ON-AVON MEETING, JUNE 29th, 1909. 

It is my first duty to return hearty thanks to the Society for 
my election to be their President, all the more as I do not belong- 
to the county by birth or descent. 

It is indeed no mean connty over which, in the archaeological 
point of view, I am called on to preside. The Society has another 
very important side, that of Natural History, which in some 
counties, for example among our neighbours of Gloucestershire 
and Bristol, claims the allegiance of flourishing Societies devotee 
to it alone. In this county, however, Geology and Zoology may 
perhaps be said to take a subordinate position, not that they have 
little importance, but that Archaeology has more. "Wiltshire, 
indeed, falls into the south eastern and eastern division of England 
the division which lies east of a line drawn from Scarborough 
through Nottingham and Warwick to Bridport, a division which 
includes no rocks older than the new red or blue lias, no igneous 
rocks with the exception of Charnwood Forest, nothing that we can 
call a mountain or a waterfall, and no hill that rises over 1000ft 
with the solitary exception of Inkpen Beacon, which is eccentrii 
only to the extent of lift., a division which, roughly speaking, i 
Saxon, agricultural, coalless, the home of the nightingale, and t 
cradle of the Anglo-Saxon race and power. These characterise 
together with remoteness from the sea, somewhat lessen the scop' 
of Wiltshire Natural History. 

But in archaeological material we distinctly shine. We may no 
compare with Yorkshire in the matter of ruined abbeys, nor wit! 
Norfolk and Somerset in that of churches ; nor can Wiltshire o 
any other county be mentioned with Northumberland when Romai 
antiquities are in question : nothing can compete with thaj 
wonderful wall. And in number of interesting historical sites w^ 
cannot claim any very high position, though we are not deficien 
in that respect, as I will note presently. But it is when we travel 



Presidential Address by Dr. J. Beddoe, LL.D., F.E.S. 203 

beyond history into the dusk of time that we rank highest. My 
old friend Sir Daniel Wilson, Principal of the University of 
Toronto, wrote an excellent book on the Pre-historic Annals of 
Scotland. Well ! words change their significance woundily with 
lapse of time and change of conditions. A journal should mean 
a daily thing, but some journals that I know are published twice 
a year. However, annals relate to known years ; and I thought 
my friend's book should have been called the Pre-annalic History 
of Scotland. And it is in pre-annalic history that we especially 
shine, the kind of history in which, if a man attempts to date an 
object within 200 years, we begin to distrust him as too precise. 
Possibly a comparison of Wiltshire with another single county 
may be more interesting and instructive ; and I will take Somerset 
: — our western neighbour — undoubtedly one of the foremost of 
English counties in several respects. 

Somerset, with its long stretch of sea and estuary coast, its wide 
marsh land, its cliffs, mountains, and caves, and its greater 
varieties of climate, is, certainly, a better field for zoologists, 
botanists, and geologists. It has some remarkably fine mediaeval 
and Tudor houses, such as Sutton Court, Montacute,andBarrington ; 
but against these we have Littlecote and Stockton, as well as two 
fine and almost unique specimens in their several ways, which 
we propose to show you : one in fact, our Bradford Hall, you 
have already seen, the other, Wraxall, you will see to-morrow. 
; Longleat, the finest of all, is common to both counties. In 
Churches we must yield the palm : Salisbury and Wells can hardly 
be compared; but few, I think would not rate Salisbury as high as 
the second class, that which immediately follows York and Lincoln 
Minsters. It is by the number and beauty of its country Churches, 
and especially of their towers, that Somerset deserves the palm ; 
for the fine Churches of Wiltshire seem to be almost confined to 
the towns, and their towers are not a great feature. Of the few 
noticeable ones that I can recollect, three, those of Colerne, West- 
wood and Stourton, are actually on the Somerset border. The 
small group of saddleback towers within the ancient parish of 
Bradford is of some interest. Part of our Western border is 

P 2 



204 Presidential Address by Dr. J. Beddoe, LL.D., F.R.S. 

a distinct ethnological frontier, north-eastern Somerset, a rough 
hilly, difficult country, having retained a larger share of the 
pre-Saxon element ; but Somerset itself might be divided into 
several ethnological districts. Whether racial differences have 
had anything to do with the facts, I will not undertake to 
say ; but Somerset has a more military history than Wiltshire. 
The manly old game of backsword used to be played in both 
counties ; and sometimes, I believe, contests took place between 
representatives of the two, as nowadays happens with cricket; 
but I have never, heard whether either county could fairly claim 
superiority. But the small and abortive rising of Penruddocke 
and Grove and their cavaliers, and the insurrection of the) 
Commons which led to the murder of Bishop Ayscough, are the only 
indications of combativeness in the Wiltshiremen that I recollect.; 
King Arthur seems to have been born, like Homer, in a good many 
places ; but his connection with Somerset is hardly deniable, ancU 
something of his fighting spirit seems to have remained there.' 
They of Wilts ran away when the Danes seized Chippenham, and! 
it was the men of Somerset who, when Alfred found his cake was! 
ready, followed him to his victory over Guthrum. 

Wiltshire seems to have acted like Issacbar during the Norman 
Conquest ; and perhaps that was the cause of so many Saxon 
proprietors retaining their lands at the time of the Domesday, 
Survey. But Somerset men struggled manfully against the in-l 
vaders at Montacute, and also, it would almost seem, against the 
Irish invasion led by the sons of Harold. They were active op i 
both sides, and against both sides as clubmen, in the war of the 
Commonwealth ; there was some stiff fighting at that time all 
Eoundway Down and elsewere, but it is not clear to me that thi\ 
natives took much part in it. I have mentioned Penruddocke anai 
Grove, Wiltshiremen who died bravely for their King ; but lateij < 
and on the other side, we come to the last sanguinary episode ill 
Southern England, in which Somerset and the west country dre\ 
the sword, and paid the horrible penalty, and curiously enougl 
at Philip's Norton, touched but did not transgress the count 
boundary. 



Presidential Address by Dr. J. Beddoe, LL.D., F.E.S. 205 

Later still, the Seventy-Ninth Regiment, whose heroic deeds 
were commemorated by Sir William Draper in the cenotaph on 
Clifton Down, was one recruited in Somerset. 

In geology, of course, the difference between these two adjacent 
shires is remarkable: it is that of east and west, of upper and 
lower, .of younger and older. The oolitic beds, it is true, are to 
some extent common; the semi-mythical stronghold of Cadbury 
occupies an oolitic bluff'; and we here in Bradford derive our 
water from oolitic beds, and possess in the Bradford Clay a 
formation of considerable interest, though perhaps we ought rather 
to be ashamed than proud of it, seing that an eminent geologist 
who visited the town to explore it, told me he could not find a 
native who knew where it was. 

But it is largely to our geological structure that we owe those 
possessions which, more than anything else, are a subject of re- 
joicing and render the county famous. It is to the great extent 
of our chalk downs, and to the presence of sarsen stones thereon, 
that we may ascribe probably the frequency and the preservation 
of our barrows, and the existence of our rude stone monuments, 
land, not to neglect a small item, that of the Westbury White Horse, 
conspicuous to the onlooker from so many parts of this town and 
i neighbourhood. 

Our barrows, long and round, have given a field for labour to 
(generations of explorers, from Sir Richard Colt Hoare, through 
Thurnam to Mrs. Cunnington ; no earthworks on this side of the 
Atlantic, I believe, except perhaps Maiden Castle, in Dorset, can 
at all vie with Old Sarum and Silbury Hill ; the Avebury Stones, 
pitifully wasted as they are, have, I suppose, hardly a parallel out 
of Brittany; and Stonehenge is absolutely unique. 

The value of these possessions is highly appreciated by many of 
us, but certainly not by all. Seventy thousand pounds are about 
to be paid for a single example of Holbein's works ; but our 
Government considered Stonehenge over-rated at the price of fifty 
thousand. I should like here to repeat that, in my opinion, much 
[gratitude is due to Sir Edmund Antrobus for the protection he 
affords to this really invaluable relic of antiquity. 



206 Presidential Address by Dr. J. Beddoe, LL.D., F.R.S. 

In olden days, and in some cases almost into our own times, 
superstitious notions reinforced the spirit of conservatism with 
respect to many prehistoric remains. But superstition may, and 
usually does, decay before enlightened respect for antiquity is 
developed; and the hiatus is occupied by sordid greed and brutal 
mischief, or, with almost equally baneful results, by well-meaning 
ignorance or balf-knowledge. Perhaps nearly as much destruction 
of valuable historical and antiquarian material is going on in our 
own day, as was perpetrated at any earlier date. The practical 
man is rampant in his selfish and wicked way ; the clerical 
restorer is unable to see things from any point of view but 
his own ; the engineer positively revels in ugliness. 

Half-culture cost a worthy man needless expense and trouble 
when he replaced the original animal at Westbury by the present 
well-formed horse ; but fortunately we have a representation of 
the old one. Even as it is, Topinard, the first of French anthro- 
pologists, told me it was worth coming from Paris to see it. 

Sheer Philistinism led the Bristolians to give away their beautiful 
cross to the Hoare family, who rightly appreciated it, and whose| 
grounds at Stourton it still adorns. Greed, destined to well-^ 
deserved disappointment, led the Corporation of Bristol to cleaij 
away that beautiful tower of St. Werburgh's from Clare Street.! 
Coupled with ignorance, it would have broken up for road metal 
or otherwise destroyed the Draper Monuments at Clifton, had non 
a rescuer chanced to pass by at the very critical moment. 

Canon Bawnsley is not ubiquitous, nor is Lord Avebury omnipol 
tent, nor are those admirable Societies which have been organizes 
for the protection and preservation of ancient monuments nearlj 
so wealthy or powerful as one could wish them to be. Beaut}] 
antiquity, an illustrious history, could not save Crosby Hall ; anil 
there is no treasure of the kind which can be considered absolutely 
safe, until it has been put under the protection of the nation, o J 
of some public body of a national character. 



207 



THE NORMAN TYMPANUM OF LITTLE LANGFORD 

CHURCH. 

By J. U. Powell. 

An obiter dictum of the Editor of this Magazine, that perhaps 
the uncommon suhject on the Tympanum of the Norman south 
door of Little Langford Church might be regarded as a represen- 
tation of St. Aldhelm, has suggested this enquiry. This Church 
which stands a few yards north of the railway, half-way between 
Wylye and Wishford, attracts the eye, as one passes it in the train, 
from its symmetrical aud spick-and-span appearance ; for the 
nave, chancel, and south chapel appear to be approximately equal 
in size, and the chessboard arrangement of stone and flint, which 
is a characteristic of the old domestic buildings of the neighbour- 
hood, give an impression of smart and trim work. The eye can 
just catch sight of a Norman south doorway in the nave with a 
carved tympanum, although of course it cannot detect the details. 

This Tympanum is illustrated in Hoare's Modem Wilts, Hun- 
dred of Branch and Dole, p. 19, and in C. E. Keyser's Norman 
Tympana, in a clear full page photograph, No. 148, and described 
on p. lxxiv. The most recent account of the Church is by Mr. C. 
E. Touting (W.A.M., xxxv., 387, June 1908) with an excellent 
photograph of the tympanum. It is probable that the good con- 
dition of the carving is partly due to the fortunate circumstance 
of the building of a south transept chapel, which has protected it 
considerably from the south-west rains. The tympanum in Hoare's 
illustration is not complete, because the right hand part of the arch 
was blocked up at the time when he wrote. Mr. Keyser describes 
it as containing " a hunting scene on the lintel ; a tree with a bird 
at the top of each of the three branches ; and a figure of an 
ecclesiastic vested, holding a pastoral staff, and in an attitude of 
benediction. As this Church is also dedicated to St. Nicholas, it 



208 The Norman Tympanum of Little Langford Church. 

is fair to assume that this saint is here designated." But in 
Archozologia xlvii., 176, for 1882, he gives an additional, but per- 
haps mistaken, detail which I do not press into the argument : 
"The left hand holds a pastoral staff whence a branch has sprouted.' 

The Editor of this Magazine suggested a different interpretation \ 
namely, that here is represented the story of Aldhelm, whose staff 
took root while he preached, and "burgeoned in his hand with 
ashleaves." 

The words in William of Malmesbury are : Gesta Pontif. Bk. V. 
230 (Eolls Series 52). 

" Quae res amrnonuit ut quod fama de Biscepes truue jactitant non 
tacerem. Villa est in valle, ad quam praedicationis sollicitudinem 
expleturus venisse dicitur. Dum sermonem sereret in plebem, forte 
baculum fraxineum quo nitebatur terrae fixisse. Ilium interim per Dei 
virtutem miram in magnitudinem excrevisse, suco animatum, cortice 
indutum, foliorum pubem et frondium decorem emisisse. Pontificem, 
qui verbo intenderet, clamore populi ammonitum respexisse, adoratoqu© 
miraculo, deo munus ibidem reliquisse ; ex primae arboris pulla multas 
pullulasse fraxinos ; adeo ut, sicut dixi, villa ilia vulgo Ad Episcopi 
Arbores nuncupetur." 

Bishopstrow is about 12 miles distant. For further criticism 
of the story see W.A.M., xxxiii., 116. 

Let us first dispose of St. Nicholas. The only ground for assum- 
ing the central figure to be St. Nicholas is, that the Church is 
dedicated to him. But there is nothing narrated in his fabulous 
life which would account for the birds in the tree and the boar- 
hunt. We must not however press this too far ; for though the 
ecclesiastic and the tree may be connected, the boar-hunt may be 
a separate subject. 

Now to turn to the subject of the carving. There are six extant 
examples of hunting-scenes onTympana(Keyser'siVor??m?i7'?/?Hpana 
Introd. xliii.). A boar-hunt is figured at Tutbury (Staffs.), Clifton 
Hampden(Oxon.), has a very good example. 1 At Eibbesford(Worc) 
an archer appears to be shooting a monster which had come out of 
the Severn and devastated the forest of Wyre ; the carving at 
Lostwithiel (Cornwall) appears to have a hawking scene, and 

'For an account of it, see Proceedings and Excursions of the Oxford 
Architectural and Historical Society, Vol. V., New Series, p. 278. 



By J. U. Powell. 209 

there are other examples. Hunting-scenes often occur on early- 
fonts (Cox, English Church Furniture, p. 193), as at Lostwithiel. 
Perhaps here indeed at Little Langford we may find a not inap- 
propriate local touch, for there were wild boars in Grovely even at 
a later date ( W.A.M., xxxv., p. 297); and we may compare the 
Wishford legend (W.A.M., xxxv., p. 310), which was attached to 
the monument of Sir Kichard Grobham in Wishford Church, how 
" he slew in Grovely "Woods a wild boar which was a terror of all 
the neighbourhood." 

Again, the subject of a tree is common ; twenty -seven examples 
are given, and this is generally thought to represent the Tree of 
Spiritual Knowledge (see Keyser, xxxiv.) ; indeed, we need not go 
far to look for an illustration, for the Tympanum on the Norman 
south door of Knook, a few miles off, has a lion (probably) and a 
dragon feeding on a tiee. This would appear to be an elaboration 
of the simple tree-design (Keyser, Introd. xxxv.), e.g., at Lullington, 
Somerset. 

Birds in trees are found at Lower Swell (Glos.) (Eomilly Allen 
Christian Symbolism, 387), and at Stoke-sub-Hamdon (Som.) is a 
carving which is rather like ours, a tree in the centre, with three 
large birds, probably doves, feeding among the branches ; below 
is an archer aiming an arrow at a lion. Fanciful interpretations 
are given of the subject of the birds in these trees, see Romilly 
Allen Christian Symbolism, 248, 255. Lastly, the figure of an 
ecclesiastic holding a pastoral staff occurs five times (E. Allen, 
284). 

Dr. A. Guest speaks of the Tympanum thus (Journal of the 
Brit. Arch. Assoc, Vol. vi. (1851), p. 83) 1 :— 

After describing the " rude lattice-work with three pellets in 
each part of the quarry," and " above the Bishop's head the 
remains of what no doubt was a canopy," he proceeds : — 

" The other stone has carved on it a figure, something like an anchor, 
and upon the shaft, as well as on the flukes, three birds are perched. 
It is evidently allegorical, and may represent the Trinity, as the anchor 
of Christian Faith." 

1 The cut is inaccurate, as the pastoral staff is turned the wrong way. 



210 The Norman Tympanum of Little Lang for A Church. 

He concludes after speaking of the boar-hunt : — 

" The whole group may not inappropriately represent the Church 
and the power of evil." 

Anyone who was in an allegorical vein might add that the pel- 
lets were a happy illustration of the grain of mustard-seed in the 
Parable, " which becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come 
and lodge in the branches thereof." 

But the lattice with pellets is really an instance of a type of 
ornament which appears at Great Koll right (Oxon) and St. Nicholas, 
Gloucester ; compare also the example at Leckhampstead. They 
are all figured in Keyser. 

The interpretation for which I would argue is this : the boar- 
hunt is a scene by itself, and the ecclesiastic and the tree refer to 
the story of St. Aldhelm. Now, is there any special reason why 
Aldhelm, more than anybody else, should be represented here ? 
The neighbourhood of the Plain is rich in traces of early work ; 
for instance, the arcade at En ford (about 1130, 1 or a little earlier), 
the Tympanum at Knook (probably between 1120 and 1150), the 
fine Arcade at Stapleford, about 1160, Longbridge Deverel (about 
the same date as Enford), Bulford, about 1130 (W.A.M., xxxi., 
69) , in all of which we may see the influence of the great Norman 
builder Eoger, Bishop of Salisbury, 1102 — 1139, and not of any 
one earlier. But the probability of earlier Norman work than 
this is strong in the case of Codford St. Mary, Codford St. Peter, 
Imber, and Netheravon. Mr. Pouting has not yet dated the 
Norman work at the neighbouring Churches of Berwick St. James 
and Winterbourne Stoke. To turn to the church under discussion, 
although Mr. Keyser (op. cit.) pronounces the arch-mouldings to 
be certainly not of early Norman character, Mr. Pouting, whom I 
have followed in the examples above, tells me that he would class 
this doorway among distinctly early Norman examples, and he is 
quite prepared to allow it as early a date as the lifetime of 
Osmund. 

1 Mr. C. E. Ponting gives these dates in various numbers of W. A.M., see 
Index sub voce. The facts about Little Langford he has communicated to me. 



By J. U. Powell. 211 

Now Osmund, 1078 — 1099, the most eminent Bishop of Salis- 
bury in Norman times, who built Old Sarum Cathedral, was clearly 
a great admirer of St. Aldhelm (see Registrum Saneti Osmundi, ii., 
Introd. p. xxxi., by the Eev. W. H. B. Jones). It was he who 
translated Aldhelm's remains to a shrine at Malmesbury, and 
obtained one of his bones for a reliquary at Salisbury, and helped 
Archbishop Lanfranc to obtain his canonisation. What is more 
likely, then, than that in Little Langford Church we find an 
illustration of the influence of Osmund, and another trace of the 
interest which he felt in Aldhelm ? 

Wiltshire is not very rich in folk-lore, and perhaps one may be 
pardoned for giving the local legend (Dr. Guest, Journal of the 
Brit. Arch. Assoc, vi. (1851), p. 85) : — 

" A fair and noble lady held vast possessions in the county, and 
claimed in a spirit of avarice what did not strictly belong to her, namely, 
a large portion of the Forest of Grovely. One day she went to the wood, 
and gathered some nuts, in one of which she found a maggot of unusual 
size, and in a fit of woman's caprice took it home and nursed it with 
such care, that it grew to an enormous magnitude, but requited the lady's 
kindness by biting her finger so severely as to cause her death. The 
broken canopy they take for the maggot, the bishop for the lady, the 
pellets for the nuts, and the birds and anchor for Grovely wood." 

The Eev. F. W. Macdonald tells the conclusion which brings in 
the boar -hunt : — 

" The beast ate her, and the inhabitants came with dogs and killed 
the beast." 

There is, perhaps, another representation of Aldhelm which 
one may still see. In Wiltshire Notes and Queries, No. 49, 
p. 12, are figured two Malmesbury Abbey seals, the first, that of 
Walter Camme.appointed Abbot in 1360,and the second is probably 
that in general use in the monastery. They are taken from Dr. 
Birch's Catalogue of Seals in the British Museum. His description 
is : — " Pointed Oval, the Abbot mitred, standing on a carved corbel, 
lifting up the r. h. in benediction ; in the 1. h. a pastoral staff 
( ? turned inwards, denoting jurisdiction within the monastery). 
In the field on either side, a small niche, with trefoiled arch con- 
taining a head, probably that of St. Aldhelm on the 1., of St. Mary 



212 The Norman Tympanum of Little Langford Church. 

on the r. [The legend is] Hoc : Aldelmus : ago : quod presens : 
signat : imago." 

I know nothing about seals, but it is odd, that, if the central 
figure is that of any other abbot than Aid helm, that the legend 
should run " Hoc Aldelmus ago? Does it not rather point to the 
central figure being Aldhelm ? If so, the small head at the left of 
the seal may represent Maildubh, the founder. It is a slight con- 
firmation of this, that the small head on the left of the seal is not 
mitred. Now Maildubh was rather a hermit than an abbot,and that 
Aldhelm was made abbot by the Bishop of the Diocese, Leutherius, 
is stated by William of Malmesbury (Bishop of Bristol, aS^. Aldhelm, 
p. 76). 



213 
THE SOCIETY'S MSS., 

QUIDHAMPTON. 
(Continued from p. 124.,) 

(37) 

1 June Jacobus Dei gratia Anglie Scocie Francie et Hibernie rex 
1603 fidei defensor &c. Omnibus ad quos presentes littere nostre 
pervenerint salutem Sciatis quod inter placita terre irrotulata 
apud Westmonasterium coram Edmundo Anderson milite et sociis suis 
justiciariis nostris de Banco de termino Pasche [11 May — 6 June] anno 
regni nostri Anglie Francie et Hibernie primo et Scocie tricesimo sexto 
rotulo xiij° continetur sic Wiltes' ss. Eobertus Welles generosus et 
Eicardus Constable generosus in propriis personis suis petunt versus 
Eicardum Spenser generosum manerium de Quidhampton cum perti- 
nenciis ac duo mesuagia centum et quadraginta acras terre sexaginta 
acras prati centum acras pasture quatuor acras bosci et decern acras 
jampnorum et bruere cum pertinenciis in Elingdon Wroughton Saltrop et 
Quidhampton ut jus et hereditatem suam Et in que idem Eicardus 
Spenser non habet ingressum nisi post disseisinam quam Hugo Hunt 
inde injuste et sine judicio fecit prefatis Eoberto et Eicardo Constable 
infra triginta annos &c. Et unde dicunt quod ipsimet fuerunt seisiti de 
manerio et tenementis predictis cum pertinenciis in dominico suo ut de 
feodo et jure tempore pacis tempore domini regis nunc capiendo inde 
explecias ad valenciam &c. Et in que &c. Et inde producunt sectam 
&c. Et predictus Eicardus Spencer in propria persona sua venit et 
defendit jus suum quando &c. et vocat inde ad warantiam Willelmum 
Brokett generosum et Saram uxorem ejus qui presentes sunt hie in curia 
in propriis personis suis et gratis manerium et tenementa predicta cum 
pertinenciis ei warantizant Et super hoc predicti Eobertus et Eicardus 
Constable petunt versus ipsos Willelmum et Saram tenentes per war- 
antiam suam manerium et tenementa predicta cum pertinentiis in forma 
predicta Et unde dicunt quod ipsimet fuerunt seisiti de manerio et 
tenementis predictis cum pertinenciis in dominio suo ut de feodo et jure 
tempore pacis tempore domini regis nunc capiendo inde explecias ad 
valeneiam &c. Et in que &c. Et inde producunt sectam &c. Et 
predicti Willelmus et Sara per warantiam suam defendunt jus suum 
quando &c. Et ulterius vocant inde ad warantiam Eicardum Humfrey 
qui similiter presens est hie in curia in propria persona sua Et gratis 
manerium et tenementa predicta eis warantizat Et super hoc predicti 
Eobertus et Eicardus Constable petunt versus ipsum Eicardum Humfrey 
tenentem per warantiam suam manerium et tenementa predicta cum 
pertinenciis in forma predicta &c. Et unde dicunt quod ipsimet fuerunt 
seisiti de manerio et tenementis predictis cum pertinenciis in dominico 



214 The Society's MSS. Qiddhampton. 

suo ut de feodo et jure tempore pacis tempore domini regis nunc capiendo 
inde explecias ad valentiam &c. Et in que &c. Et inde producunt 
sectam &c. Et predictus Ricardus Humfrey tenens per warantiam suam 
defendit jus suum quando &c. Et dieit quo predictus Hugo non disseisivit 
prefatum Eobertum et Eicardum Constable de manerio et tenementis 
predictis cum pertinenciis prout iidem Eobertus et Eicardus per breve 
et narracionem sua predicta superius supponunt Et de hoc ponit se 
super patriam &c. Et predicti Eobertus et Eicardus Constable petunt 
licenciam inde interloquendi Et habent &c. Et postea iidem Eobertus 
et Eicardus Constable reveniunt hie in curiam eodem termino in propriis 
personis suis Et predictus Ricardus Humfrey licet solempniter exactus 
non revenit set in comtemptu curie recessit Et defaltam facit Ideo 
consideratum est quod predicti Eobertus et Eicardus Constable recuperent 
seisinam suam versus prefatum Eicardum Spenser de manerio et tene- 
mentis predictis cum pertinenciis Et quod idem Ricardus habeat de 
terra predictorum Willelmi et Sare ad valenciam &c. Et quod iidem 
Willelmus et Sara ulterius habeant de terra predicti Eicardi Humfrey 
ad valenciam &c. Et idem Eicardus in misericordia &c. Et super 
hoc predicti Eobertus et Eicardus Constable petunt breve domini 
regis vicecomiti comitatus predicti dirigendum de habere faciendo eis 
plenariam seisinam de manerio et tenementis predictis cum pertinenciis 
Et eis conceditur retornabile hie in crastino sancte Trinitatis &c. Que 
omnia et singula ad requisicionem predictorum Eoberti et Eicardi 
Constable tenore presentiurn duximus exemplificanda. In cujus rei 
testimonium sigillum nostrum ad brevia in Banco predicto sigillanda 
deputatum presentibus apponi fecimus. Teste Edmundo Anderson 
apud Westmonasterium primo die Junii anno regni nostri Anglie Francie 
et Hibernie primo et Scocie tricesimo sexto 

Brownlowe. 
Fragment of seal of the Common Pleas. 

No. 112. 

It appears by the foregoing documents that in May, 1603, Eichard 
Spenser acquired the manor of Quidhampton in fee. He had 
previously, in 1600, purchased certain lands convenient to be held 
with it, and which have, ever since, been so held, as appears by 
the documents immediately following. 

Cancoukt Fields. 
By indenture, 31 Aug., 21 Elizabeth [1586], John Weare alias 
Browne, and Thomas Weare alias Browne, his son, sold the lands, 
as under, to Anthony Diston. The original indenture was not 
forthcoming at the time of the making of the " Abstract " : that 
there was such an indenture executed appears by a recital in the 
document last below of this series. Diston having purchased the 



The Society's MSS- Quielhampton. 215 

lands in question on 31st Aug., 1586, immediately afterwards, 
viz., 2nd Oct. in the same year, demised them, as appears by the 
recital in the document first below, to the said John "Weare alias 
Browne, for the term of forty-one years at 12/. rent. In March, 
1599 — 1600 John Weare alias Browne, assigned the years yet to 
come of this lease to Bichard Spenser, who in October following 
bought the fee of the said Anthony Diston, subject to a grant of 
the premises by Diston, for the lives of himself and his wife, to 
Digges and others, as appears by the documents which follow : — 



(38) 

4 March, To all Christien People to whom this present wrytinge 
1599 — 1600. shall come John "Weare alias Browne of Cancourte within the 
parishe of Lyddiard Treigoze in the Countye of Wiltes yeoman 
sende greeatinge in our Lorde God euerlastinge That whereas Anthony 
Diston ofMarleboroughe in theCountye of Wiltes ffishemonger by indenture 
bearinge date the seconde daye of October in the xxviij" 1 yere of the raign 
of our moste gracious soueraign ladye Elizabethe the Queenes maiestie 
that nowe is [1586J, for the consideracions therein expressed demysed 
graunted and to ffarme dyd lett and sett vnto the said John Weare alias 
Browne his executors and assignes all those his three seuerall Sides or 
groundes of errable and pasture as they are nowe enclosed comonly called 
or knowen by the seuerall names of the Overfildes and the Crofte con- 
teyninge by estymacion threeschore and ffoure acres of grounde be yt 
more or lesse To haue and to holde the saide three seuerall groundes 
vnto the said John Weare alias Browne his executors and assignes ffrom 
the feaste of Saincte Michaell tharchaungell laste paste before the date 
of the said indenture vnto the mill ende and terme of ffortye and one 
yeres ffrom thens next ensuenge and fully to be completed and ended 
Yeldinge and payenge therefore yerely duringe the said terme vnto the 
saide Anthony Diston his heires and assignes at the nowe dwellinge 
howse of the same Anthony beinge in Marlebroughe aforesaide the 
somme of twelve poundes of good and laufull money of England on the 
feaste dayes of thanunciacion of the Virgin Marye and Sainct Michaell 
or within the space of fyftene dayes next after euery of the same 
feaste dayes by even porcions to be payde, as in and by the same 
Indenture emonges other the couenauntes therein conteyned the 
same more at large appeerethe Knowe ye me the said John Weare 
alias Browne vpon good consideracion me hereunto especiallie 
movinge Hathe gyven graunted assigned and sett ouer and by these 
presentes dothe ffullie clerely and absolutelie gyve graunte assigne and sett 
ouer vnto Kichard Spencer of Quidehampton within the parishe of 
Ellington alias Wroughton in the County aforesaid yoman as well the 
said three seuerall groundes before mencioned as allso all my right title 



216 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

intereste estate possession terme of yeresconteynid in the said indenture 
to hym made by the said Anthony Diston as aforesaid with the deliuery 
of the same indenture To haue and to holde the saide seueral groundes 
and euery of them before mencioned vnto the said Richard Spencer his 
executors and assignes ffrom the daye of the date hereof vntill the said 
estate intereste and terme of yeres therof made as aforesaid by the said 
Anthony Diston to the said John Weare alias Browne by effluccion of 
tyme and course of yeres monethes weekes and dayes shall be expired 
and run forthe And the said John Weare alias Browne for hym selfe 
his executors and administrators and for euery of them dothe couenaunt 
promise and graunte to and with the said Richard Spencer his executors 
administrators and assignes by these presentes, that he the said Richard 
Spencer his executors and assignes shall or maye peacibly and quietly 
haue holde and enioye all and singuler the demysed premisses and euery 
parte and parcell thereof for and duringe the terme to hym before by 
these presentes lymytted and appointed clerely discharged and voyde of 
all former bargaynes sales guif tes f orfactures and all other incumbraunces 
whatsoever hadd made comytted suffered or don by the said John Weare 
alias Browne, the said Richard Spencer his executors administrators and 
assignes and every of them from the date hereof disehargeinge the said 
John Weare alias Browne his executors and admininistrators of all suche 
rentes duties and seruices as of right are due and payable out of the said 
premisses by any reseruacion couenaunte condicion or agrement and 
performe (sic) all the couenauntes in the said indenture made by the 
said Anthony Diston as aforesaid which the said John Weare alias 
Browne by force of the same stode charged to do and thereof acquite and 
discharge the said John Weare alias Browne his executors and adminis- 
trators. In Witnes whereof I the said John Weare alias Browne to 
this my present dede my seale haue putto. Yoven the ffouerthe daye of 
Marche in the two and fortithe yere of the raign of our soueraign ladye 
Elizabethe by the grace of god Queene of Englond ffraunce and Irelond 
defender of the ffaithe &c. 1599. 

John X Browns marke 

Sealed signed and deliuered in the presens of vs 

Joh : Sadler 
Nicholas Browne 
William Browne 

Seal, a knot. 

Endorsed. — Memorandum it is condiscended and agreed betwene the 
within named parties Richard Spencer and John Browne alias Weare 
before the parties vnderwritten, that the said John Browne alias Weare 
shall have at anie tyme vppon lawfull requeste made by him, leave of 
the saide Richarde Spencer to traveyle and passe with his waine vpp the 
hill with anie necessarie cariags as his need shall require. 

Joh : Sadler 
Nicholas Browne 
William Brownb 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 217 

Endorsed. — The assignernent of the lease for yeares by John Weare 
alias Browne vnto Richard Spenser. 4 Mar. Eliz: Eeg: 42: 1599, 
and numbered " 1 " and " 32." 

No. 106. 



(39) 

6 Oct., This Indenture made the sixt day of October in the Two 
1600. and Fortythe yere of the reigne of our Sovereigne lady Elizabeth 
by the grace of God Queene of Englande France and Irelande 
defendor of the faythe &c. Betwene Anthony Dyston of Marlebroughe 
in the county of Wiltes' Fyshemonger on thone party And Richard 
Spenser of Quidhampton in the parishe of Ellingdon alias Wroughton 
in the saide countie yoman on thother party Witnessethe that the 
said Anthony Dyston for and inconsideracion of the some of Fourescore 
pounds of good and lawfull money of Englande to hym before then- 
sealinge and delivery hereof well and truly paide and satisfyed by the 
saide Richarde Spenser, whereof and wherewith he the saide Anthony 
Dyston acknowledgethe hymselfe to be fully paide and satisfyed, and 
thereof and of every parte and parcell thereof doth clerely acquite and 
discharge the said Richard Spenser his executors and administrators 
and every of them by these presentes, Hathe graunted alyened confirmed 
bargayned and solde, and by these presentes dothe fully clerely and 
absolutely graunt alyen confirme bargayne and sell unto the saide 
Richard Spenser, All those Three severall feildes and grounds of arable 
and pasture as they are nowe enclosed, comonly called and knowen by 
the names of the Overfeilds and the Crofte, or by what other name or 
names soever they or any of them or any parcell thereof be called or 
knowen, with all and singuler their appurtenaunces One of which saide 
grounds or feilds conteynethe by estimacion Fortie acars be yt more or 
lesse another of the same grounds or feilds conteynethe by estimacion 
Twentie acars be yt more or lesse, and the other feilde or Crofte con- 
teynethe by estimacion Foure acars be yt more or lesse, which saide 
Three feildes Croftes and grounds sometyrne were parcell and did belonge 
to the Capitall Mesuage or Farme of Cancourte in the parishe of Lydiard 
Treygose in the saide county of Wiltes' and are lyenge in the the saide 
parishe of Lydiard Treygose, betwene certayne feilds there called 
Salthrop feilds on the east parte, and a certaine pasture grounde 
called Sandfurlonge on the sowthe parte, and certen feilds 
belonginge to the farme of Quidhampton aforesaide nowe in the 
occupacion of the saide Richarde Spenser on the weste parte, 
and certen feilds belonginge to the Farme of Studley within 
the saide county on the northe parte thereof, And also all the tymber 
trees hedgerowes woods and underwoods growinge beinge and renewinge 
in and upon the premisses or any parte thereof, And all thestate right 
tytle interest use possession revercion and revercions remaynder and re- 
maynders clayme and demande whatsoever of the saide Anthony Dyston 
out of in and to the saide three severall feilds croftes and groundes 

,VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. Q 



218 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

above by these presentes mencionid to be bargayned and solde and 
oute of in and to every parte and parcell thereof To have holde and 
enjoye the said Three severall feildes croftes and grounds with their 
appurtenaunces and all and singuler other the premisses before by thes& 
presentes mencioned to be bargayned and solde unto the saide Eiehard 
Spenser his heyres and assignes to and for the only use and behoofe of 
the same Eiehard Spenser and of his heyres and assignes for ever To be 
holden of the chiefe lorde or lordes of the fee or fees thereof by the rentes- 
and services therfore dewe and of right accustomed And the saide 
Anthony Dyston for hymselfe his heyres executors and administrators- 
dothe covenaunte and graunt to and with the saide Richard Spenser his 
heyres and assignes by these presentes in manner and forme followinge,. 
that is to say, That he the said Anthony Dyston at the tyme of then- 
sealinge and delivery of these presentes (notwithstandinge any acte or 
actes thinge or thinges done or wittingly or willingly suffered, or to be done 
or wittingly or willingly suffered by hym the saide Anthony Dyston, to the- 
contrary), is, and so at the tyme of thexecucion of thestate of and in th& 
premisses unto the said Eiehard Spenser accordinge to the tenour of 
these presentes shalbe, soly and rawfully seized of and in the saide three 
severall grounds croftes and feildes and of and in every parte and parcell 
thereof, of a good perfect and lawf ull estate of inheritance in his demesne- 
as of fee, in his owne right, to thonly use of hymselfe and his heyres, with- 
out any manner of condieion' or lymitacion of use or uses to alter change- 
determin or defeat the same, And that he the saide Anthony Dyston 
nowe at the tyme of thensealinge and delivery of these presentes, not- 
withstandinge any acte or actes thinge or thinges by hym done or 
wittingly or willingly suffered or to be done or wittingly or willingly 
suffered to the contrary, hathe and so at and untill suche tyme as a good 
lawfull and perfect estate shalbe executid unto the same Eiehard Spenser 
and his heyres of and in the premisses as aforesaid, shall have good right 
full power and lawfull authority to graunt alyen confirme bargayne and 
selle the same premisses and everye parte and parcell thereof unto the 
saide Eicharde Spenser, his heyres, and assignes for ever accordinge to 
the true meaninge of these presente Indentures And further that the 
saide Three severall feildes croftes and grounds with their appurtenaunces 
and every parte and parcell thereof nowe are and so at all tymes hereafter 
and from tyme to tyme shall contynew and remayne unto the saide 
Eiehard Spenser his heyres and assignes clerely acquited and discharged 
or otherwise by the saide Anthony Dyston his heyres executors or ad- 
ministrators within convenient tyme after and upon every reasonable 
request to hym or them therefore to be made, sufficiently saved or kept 
harmeles of and from all and all manner of former and other bargaynes 
sales guyftes grauntes leases joynctures dowers uses willes entayles 
yssues amerciamentes rentes annuyties statutes merchant and of the 
staple recognizances execucions and of and from all other tytles charges 
estates trowbles and encombrances whatsoever had made done or wit- 
tingly or willingly suffered assented or consented unto by the saide 
Anthony Dyston or by any other person or persons lawfully clayminge 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 219 

from by or under hym, or by his meanes assent defaulte or procurement, 
Excepte the chiefe rentes and services which after thensealinge and 
delivery of these presentes shall grow dewe and payable to the chiefe lord 
or lords of the fee or fees of the premisses, and one Indenture of lease 
bearinge date the second day of October in the eight and twentithe yere 
of the reigne of oure saide sovereigne Lady Queene Elizabeth that nowe 
is, made of the premisses by the saide Anthony Dyston unto one John 
Weare alias Browne for the terme of forty and one yeres by and under 
the yerely rent of twelve pounds of lawfull Englishe money, And except 
one graunt by Indenture of all and every the premisses and the revercion 
thereof with thappurtenaunces heretofore made by the saide Anthony 
Dyston unto Gyles Digges and Thomas Sclatter, bearinge date the 
thirtithe day of September nowe last past for the terme of the naturall 
lyves of the saide Anthony Dyston and Johane nowe his wyfe and the 
longest lyver of them for the yerely rent of one penny of lawfull money 
of Englande which saide yerely rentes from hensforthe shalbe dewe and 
payable accordinge to the tenour of the same grauntes and leases, And 
moreover that he the said Anthony Dyston and his heyres and assignes 
(except only the saide severall leassees whose estates are before herein 
Exceptid and their assignes, and that only for their saide severall estates 
before hereby Exceptid) shall and will at all tymes hereafter within the 
space of fyve yeres next ensuinge the date hereof at and upon every 
lawfull and reasonable request of the saide Kichard Spenser his heyres 
and assignes, do make knowledge execute and suffer to be done made 
knowledged and executid, all and every such further and other act and 
actes thing and thinges devise and devises conveyances and assurances 
in the lawe whatsoever, be yt by fyne or fynes to be levied, feoffement, 
release confirmacion deed or deeds enrolled, thinrolment of these presentes 
recovery or recoveryes with single or double voucher or by any or by all 
thaforesaide wayes and meanes, with warranty only against the saide 
Anthony Dyston and his heyres or without warranty, for the further 
more and better assurance suerty and suermakinge of the premisses and 
every parte and pareell thereof with thappurtenaunces unto the saide 
Richard Spenser his heyres and assignes for ever, as by the saide Richard 
Spenser his heyres or assignes or by his or their councell learned in the 
lawe, and at thonly costes and charges in the lawe of the saide Richard 
Spenser his heyres and assignes shalbe reasonably devised advised and 
required, In wytnes whereof the saide parties to these presente Inden- 
tures enterchangeably have sett their seales, Geven the day and yere 
first abovewritten. 

Signed Anthony Dyston. Seal cut off. 

Endorsed, sealed and delivered in the presence of us 

Thomas Sclatter Sen' 
Thomas Bennett 
John Spenser 
Joh: Sadler. 

Numbered on outside " 3," altered into " 6 " ; and also " 33." 

No. 107. 

Q 2 



220 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

(40) 

7 Oct. Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos hoc presens scriptum per- 
1600. venerit ego Anthonius Dyston de Marlebroughe in comitatu 
Wiltes' Fyshemonger salutem in Domino sempiternam, Sciatis 
me prefatum Anthonium Dyston pro et [in] parte complementi quarundam 
convencionum et agreamentorum in quibusdam Indenturis gerentibus 
datum sexto die Octobris nunc ultimo preterito factis inter me prefatum 
Anthonium Dyston ex una parte et quendam Richardurn Spenser de 
Quidhampton in parochia de Ellingdon alias Wroughton in dicto comitatu 
Wiltes'yoman ex altera parte specificatarum.Concessisse alienasse feoffasse 
barganiasse vendidisse et hoc presenti scripto rneo confirmasse prefato 
Richardo Spenser Omnia ilia tria separalia claus' terre arabilis et pasture 
communiter vocata sive nuncupata per nomina deLeOverfeilds et le Crofte, 
vel per quecunque alia nomina eadem modo vocata seu cognita existunt, 
continentia per estimacionem sexaginta et quatuor acras, sive majus sive 
minus, scituate (sic) jacentia et existentiain parochia de Lydiard Treygose 
in comitatu Wiltes', inter quosdam campos ibidem vocatos Salthrop 
feilds ex parte orientali, et quandam pasturam communiter vocatam per 
nomen de Sandfurlonge ex parte Australi, quosdam campos pertinentes 
capitali mesuagio sive Firme de Quidhampton predicta modo in occu- 
pacione predicti Richardi Spenser ex parte occidentali et quosdam campos 
pertinentes Capitali mesuagio sive Firme de Studley in comitatu predicto 
ex parte boreali, Ac eciam omnia alia terras tenementa et hereditamenta 
quecunqe in parochia de Lydiard Treygose predicta que ego prefatus 
Anthonius Dyston nuper habui et perquisivi mihi et heredibus meis de 
quodam Johanne Weare alias Browne et Thoma Weare alias Browne 
filio ejusdem Johannis per quasdam Indenturas inde factas gerentes 
datum ultimo die Augusti Anno regni dicte domine nostre Elizabethe 
nunc Regine Anglie &c. vicesimo octavo, Ac omnia arbores boscos et 
subboscos crescentes et existentes in et super premissis seu aliqua inde 
parcella Necnon Revercionem et reverciones omnium et singuloruui 
premissorum Habendum tenendum et gaudendum predicta tria clans' 
terre arabilis et pasture ac omnia et singula cetera premissa superius per 
presentes conoessa ac Revercionem et Reverciones inde cum pertinentiis 
prefato Richardo Spenser heredibus et assignatis suis ad solum et pro- 
piium opus et usum predicti Richardi Spenser heredum et assignatorum 
suorum imperpetuum Tenendum de capitalibus dominis feodi illius per 
servicia inde prius debita et de jure consueta Et ego vero prefatus 
Anthonius Dyston et heredes mei predicta terras tenementa et heredita- 
menta cum suis pertinentiis prefato Richardo Spenser heredibus et 
assignatis suis ad opus et usum supradictos contra me prefatum 
Anthonium Dyston et heredes meos warantizabimus et imperpetuum 
defendemus per presentes Sciatis insuper me prefatum Anthonium 
Dyston fecisse ordinasse et in loco meo per presentes posuisse et con- 
stituisse dilectos mihi in Christo Robertum Welles et Radulphum Pearse 
alias Hurde meos veros et legittimos Attornatos conjunctim et divisim 
pro me vice et nomine meo in predicta terras tenementa et hereditaments 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 221 

superius per presentes concessa cum suis pertinentiis ad intrandum et 
plenam et pacificaui possessionen et seizinam inde capiendum, Et post 
hujusinodi possessionem et seizinam sic inde captas et habitas deinde 
plenam et pacificam possessionem et seizinam inde prefato Eichardo 
Spenser aut suo certo Attornato deliberandum secundum vim tenorem 
forinam et effectum hujus presentis scripti mei inde confecti Eatum et 
gratum habentera et habiturum totum et quicquid dicti Attornati mei 
fecerint vel eorum alter fecerit in premissis per presentes. In cujus Eei 
testimonium ego prefatus Anthonius Dyston buic presenti scripto meo 
sigillum meum apposui. Datum septimo die Octobris Anno regni Domine 
nostre Elizabethe Dei gratia Anglie Francie et Hibernie Eegine fidei 
defensoris &c. Quadragesimo secundo 

(Signed) Anthony Dtston. 

Sealed and delivered in the presence of us Thomas Sclatter sen' and 
Thomas Bennett not' publick 

Endorsed Peceable possession and seizen of and in the premisses 
within bargained and solde was taken by Eoberte Welles & Ealphe Pearse 
Attornies withinnamed and by them presently delivered to the within- 
named Eichard Spencer, To have and to holde to the same Eichard his 
heires and assignes for ever accordinge to the true meaninge of this 
presente deede on the sixtenthe daie of October in the yere within 
written in the presence of us 

Eobebt Eichman Tho X Eyman's marke 

William Spencer Thomas Paesons 

Eichard Bestman 

M d . that on the first day of November in the xlij th yere of the Queene's 
Majestie's reigne withinwritten Gyles Digges and Thomas Sclatter 
tenantes of the lands and tenementes withingraunted for the lyves of 
the withinnamed Anthony Dyston and of Johane his wyfe did Attorne 
tenentes of the premisses unto the saide Eichard Spenser by the delivery 
of sixe pence apece to the same Eicharde in the presence of us 

Anthony Dyston 
and Thomas Bennett 

The feoffment by Anthony Diston unto Eichard Spenser 7 th Octobr* 
Eliz. Eeg. 42. 

Numbered " 3 " and " 34." 

No. 108. 

The subsequent dealings of the Spencer family with (1) the 
manor of Quidhampton, (2) the fields formerly parcel of Cancourt, 
ippear in the deeds which follow : — 

(41) 

6 January 18: Ja: 1: 1620 [1620-1] By Indenture between 
John Spencer gent, on the one part and S r George Ayliff Kn'. & Tho : 
Ayliffe gent, sons of John Aylfffe of the other part. The said John 



222 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

Spencer in consideracion of a marriage to be had betweenehim and Anne 

Ayliffe one of the daughters of the said John Ayliffe which Anne was 

whole sister of Thomas Ayliffe and in consideracion of a competent 

assureance of a Joynture to be made to the said Anne in liew of Dower 

Did give grant and confirme unto the s d . S r . Geo : Ayliffe &Tho : Ayliffe 

One annuity or yerely rent of 80 1 ' issueing out of the mannor 

farm and lands of Quidhampton cum jpertinenciis in Wroughton & 

Elingdon in com' Wilts' and out of the three closes of arable land 

called the Overfeild and the Croft one of which containes 40 acres 

another 20 acres and the other four acres which three feilds were 

part of the farm of Cancourt in Lidiard Tregosse. 

To hold perceive & take the s d . annuity or yearly rent of 80 u unto the 

s d . S r . Geo : Ayliffe & Tho : Ayliffe their Executors administrators &1 

assignes imediately after the decease of the said John Spencer for 99 

years If Anne Ayliffe should survive the said John Spencer and should 

so long live, to be paid to the said S r . Geo : Ayliffe & Tho : Ayliffe their 

Executors &c. for the benefitt of Anne Ayliffe by quarterly payments and 

20 s . as a Nomine pence in default of payment for 15 days after any 

quarter day with clause of distress & usuall covenants. 

(42) 

10 January, This Indenture made the tenth day of January in the 
1620-1 yeares of the raigne of our moste gracious soueraigne Lord 
James by the grace of god Kinge of England ffrance and 
Ireland Deffender of the ffayth &c. the eightenth and of Scotland the 
ffower and ffyftyth Betweene John Spencer of Quidhampton in the 
Countie of Wiltes gent, of the one partie and S r . George Ayliffe of 
Grittenham in the Countie of Wiltes knight and Thomas Ayliffe gent, 
sonnes of John Ayliffe of Gryttenham aforesaid esquio' brothers of, 
Anne Ayliffe one of the daughters of the said John Ayliffe of the 
other partie Witnesseth that whereas there is intended by the grace 
of god that there shalbe a marriage had and solempnised betweene 
the said John Spencer and the said Anne Now therefore the said 
John Spencer in consideracion of the said marriage and of the 
naturall loue and affection which he doth beare vnto the heires males 
which he shall begett on the body of the saide Anne and to and 
for theire advancement in liueinge and mayntenance in time to 
come and for the continuance of the mannor lordshippe landes tenementes 
and hereditamentes hereafter mencioned in the name and bloud of the 
said John Spencer and in consideracion that the said John Spencer hath 
had or is secured to haue six hundred pounds as a marriage porcion with 
the said Anne Hath couenanted graunted concluded and fmllie con- 
disended to and with the said S r George Ayliffe and Thomas Ayliffe and 
by theise presents for him his heires, and assignes doth ffullie couenant 
graunt conclude and condisend to and with the said S r George Ayliffe 
and Thomas Ayliffe that he the said John Spencer his heires and 
assignes and all and every other person and persons an}' thinge 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 223 

haueinge or lawfullie claymeinge of in or to the mannor lordshippe 
landes tenernentes and hereditamentes hereafter mencioned That 
is to say of in and to all that the mannor lordshippe and ffarrne 
of Quidhampton with thappurtenaunces scituate and beinge in or 
nere the parish of Wroughton alias Elingdon in the said County 
of Wiltes and of in and to all and singuler the messuages cottages 
howses buildinges gardens orchardes courtes yardes curtilages landes 
tenernentes meadowes leasowes pastures ffeedinges woodes vnder- 
woodes and trees of in and vpon the premisses or any parte thereof 
groweinge and beinge and of in and to all the ground and soyle of the 
said woodes and vnderwoodes commons ffishinges wastes waste growndes 
rentes revercions services proffittes commodities emolumentes and here- 
ditamentes whatsoeuer now or heretofore held vsed occupied or enioyed 
by one Richard Spencer deceased father of the said John Spencer or to 
him demised or letten as parte parcell or member of or as belongeinge or 
appertayneinge to the said mannor lordshippe or ffarrne and the revercion 
and revercions remaynder and remaynders of all and singuler the said 
mannor lordshippe ffarrne and premisses and of every parte and parcell 
thereof and of in and to all rentes and yearely proffittes that are reserved 
out of or for the same or any parte thereof Together with all deedes 
charters evidences writtinges terrars escriptes and minimentes con- 
cerneinge onely the said mannor lordshippe ffarrne and other the 
premisses or onely any parte thereof And alsoe of in and to all those 
three severall fheldes and growndes of arrable and pasture as they are 
nowe enclosed commonlie called and knowne by the names of the Over- 
ffieldes and the Crofte or by what other name or names soever they or 
any of them or any parcell thereof be called or knowne with all and 
singuler theire appurtenaunces one of which said groundes or ffieldes 
conteyneth by estimacion fforty acres be it more or lesse another of the 
same growndes or ffieldes conteyneth by estimacion twentie acres be it 
more or lesse and the other ffield or crofte coteyneth by estimacion fowre 
acres be it more or lesse which said three ffieldes crof tes and growndes 
■sometimes were parcell and did belonge to the capitall messuage or ffarrne 
of Cancourte in the parishe of Liddiard Treygose in the said Countie of 
Wiltes and are lyinge in the saide parishe of Liddiard Treygose betweene 
certayne ffieldes there called Salthroppe ffieldes on the east parte and a 
certaine pasture grownd called Sandfurlonge on the south parte and cer- 
taine ffieldes belongeinge to the ffarrne of Quidhampton aforesaide late in 
the occupacion of the aforesaid Richard Spencer on the west parte and 
certaine ffieldes belongeinge to the ffarrne of Studly within the said 
County on the north parte thereof and alsoe of in and to all the tymber 
trees hedgerowes woodes and vnderwoodes groweinge beinge and renew- 
inge in and vpon the premisses or any parte thereof And of in and to 
the reuercion and reuercions remaynder and remaynders of him the said 
John Spencer of in and to the said three severall ffieldes croftes and 
growndes and premisses with thappurtenaunces and of in and to every 
parte and parcell thereof and of every of them shall stand and be thereof 
and of every of them and of every parte and parcell thereof with 



224 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

theire and every of theire appurtenaunces seised from henceforth to the 
vse of him the said John Spencer and the heires males of the body of 
him the said John Spencer on the body of the said Anne lawfullie to be 
begotten and for default of such issue to the vse of the right heires of 
him the said John Spencer for ever and to no other vse intent or purpose 
And the said John Spencer for his heires executours administratours 
and assignes and every of them doth covenant promise and graunt to 
and with the said S r . George Ayliffe and Thomas Ayliffe theire executours- 
administratours and assignes by these presentes That he the said John 
Spencer for and notwithstanding any act thinge charge graunt estate in- 
cumbrance or demaund whatsoeuer had made done committed or 
wittingelie or willingely suffered by him the said John Spencer is and 
standeth seised of a good perfect and absolute estate in ffee simple of 
and in all and singuler the said mannor lordshippe ffarme landes tene- 
mentes hereditamentes and premisses and every of them with theire and 
every of theire appurtenaunces and that the said mannor lordshippe 
ffarme landes tenementes hereditamentes and premisses and every of 
them shall discend and come of such estate immediatelie after the death 
of him the said John Spencer vnto the said heires males of the said John 
Spencer on the body of the said Anne lawfullie to be begotten as afore- 
said if any shalbe and that discharged ffreed acquitted and exonerated 
or from tyme to tyme saued and kept harmelesse of and from all bargaines 
sales guiftes grauntes joyntures dowers statutes marchant and of the 
staple recognisances judgementes execucions willes intayles intrusions 
ffines issues amerciamentes tytles troubles and demaundes whatsoever 
other then one annuitie or yearely rent of ffowerscore poundes of lawful! 
mony of England graunted by the said John Spencer to the abouesaid 
S r George Ayliffe and Thomas Ayliffe for ffowerscore and ninteene yeares 
determinable vpon the life of the said Anne Ayliffe for the benefitt of the 
said Anne as in nature of a jouynture and to begin after the decease of 
him the said John Spencer And further the said John Spencer for him 
his heires and assignes doth covenant promise and graunt to and with 
the said S r George Ayliffe and Thomas Ayliffe their executours adminis- 
tratours and assignes by these presentes That he the said John Spencer 
and all and singuler other person and persons any thinge haueinge or 
lawfully claymeinge of in or to the said mannor lordshippe ffarme landes- 
tenementes hereditamentes and premisses or any of them theire or any 
of theire appurtenaunces shall and will at all times hereafter within the 
space of ten yeares next ensueinge the date hereof make doe execute or 
cause to be made done or executed every such ffurther act and actes 
thinge and thinges deuise and deuises for the ffurther better and more- 
sure setlinge vestinge conveyinge and assureinge of the said mannor 
lordshippe ffarme landes tenementes hereditamentes and premisses in 
and to the vses of him the said John Spencer and the heires males of 
him the said John Spencer on the body of the said Anne lawfullie to be 
begotten as by the said S r George Ayliffe and Thomas Ayliffe theire 
heires or assignes or theire or either of their Councell learned in the law 
shallbe reasonably aduised deuised or required be it by ffine or ffines- 



The Society's 31SS. Quidliampton. 225- 

with proolamaeions or without recovery with one or more voucher or 
vouchers over feoffment confirmation with warrantie against him and 
his heires onely or without release or by all every or any the wayes 
abouesaid Provided allwayes that the said John Spencer be not com- 
pelled to trauayle above thirty myles from his then dwellinge house for 
the doeinge or executinge thereof In witnes whereof the parties ffirst 
abouenamed to these presentes interchangeably have sett theire handes 
and seales the day and yeare ffirst abouewritten 

Geoege Ayljffe Thomas Atliffe 

Seals cut off. 

indorsed, Signed sealed and deliuered in the presence of 

Thomas Smythe 
Signed sealed and deliuered in the presence of 
Arthur Ayliffe Edward Smith 

Edwabd Simpsion Raphe Weekes. 



Numbered "42. 



No. 122. 



(43) 
28th June 12 : Car : 1 : 1636 An Inquisition post mortem Johannis 
Spencer whereby it appears that the manor of Quidliampton cum 
pertinentiis in the parish of Wroughton alias Elingdon are held and at 
the time of the death of John Spencer were held of the king by the 
halfe of a knights fee upon the disolucion of the Abbey of "Wilton and 
of the Priory of Brudestock or one of them and that the three severall 
closes of arable land eontaineing by estimacion 64 acres lyeing near 
Quidhampton called Overfeild and le Croft parcell of a capital messuage 
or farme called Cancourt in the parish of Luddiard Tregosse in com* 
Wilts' are and at the time of the death of s d . John Spencer were held 
as in the first Inquisicion are mencioned. Q the first Inquisicion. 

(44) 
16 March, 1642 [1642-3] By Indenture Between John Spencer of the 
one part and William Sadler gent' & Bichard Spencer late administrators 
of John Spenser gent' deceased late father of John Spencer during the 
minority of John Spencer party to the s d . Indenture sole executor of his 
s d . late father and then of the age of 21 of the other part Beciteing the 
said will and that the said John Spencer party to these presents being by 
inquisicion found to be in ward to the king The said William Sadler and 
Richard Spencer partys thereto had entred into great bonds in the Court 
of Wards And takeing notice that the s a . Sadler and Spencer according 
to the trust reposed in them by the will faithfully managed the said 
estate both in lands and goods and duly administred the estate of the 
deceased and had since the full age of the s d . John Spencer given an 
account of their trust And that Martha one of the deceased's daughters 
dyeing before she came of age to receive her porcion and Bichard the 
son & Mary the other daughter being survivors & not then of age to 



226 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

receive their porcions And W m . Sadler & Richard Spenser haveing with 
the money by them raised taken two leases for 21 years of severall lands 
of a good yearly value which they then agreed to assigne to Jn°. Spencer 
assoonas a fine should be levyed by the said John for the confirmacion 
of this grant thereby to enable him to pay the porcions to his brother 
& sister and made full satisfaccion for the trust and for performance of 
the will of his father and to discharge the trustees touching the payment 
of childrens porcions and all charges The Indenture witnessed That in 
consideracion of the premisses and saveing harmless Sadler and Spencer 
touching the trust The said John Spencer did demise and grant to the 
said Sadler and Richard Spenser. 

All that the said manor or lordshipp and farm of Quidhampton 

cum pertinen cits in Wroughton alias Elinden in com' Wilts' together 

with the houses buildings gardens and three fields of arable called 

the Overfields and the Croft belonging to the farm of Cancourt in 

Liddiard Tregosse in com' Wilts'. 

To hold to the s cl W' n . Sadler and Richard Spencer their executors, 

&c. for 99 years at a peppercorn rent payable at Michaelmas with a 

covenant for quiet enjoyment against all persons except the rent of 80 u 

thentofore granted by Jn°. Spencer father of the grantor And that the s a . 

John Spencer would before Trinity term then next at his own charge 

levy a fine of the premisses to such persons as should be advised The 

use of which fine was thereby declared to be to the s d . William Sadler 

and Richard Spencer dureing the term Subject to the condicion and 

proviso after expressed and to the revercion in fee after the term, To the 

use of the s d . John Spencer and his heirs Subject to a proviso that on 

payment of his brothers and sisters porcions according to the will of his 

father and maintenance, in the meantime And indemnify Sadler and 

Spencer their executors administrators and assignes against all charges 

And under this further Proviso that if after the fine levyed the said 

Sadler and Spencer should refuse to seal a Counterpart of the lease of 

Suttons Hospitall for corroroberateing (sic) this lease, the same to be 

void and that John Spencer the grantor should continue the possession 

untill some disturbance from the brothers or sisters of the s d . John 

Spencer for non-payment of the porcions or any misadministration. 

(45) 
19th Aug*. 1648. Articles of Agreement Between John Spencer 
Esq r . of the one part & Thomas Bennett of the other part whereby the 
s' 1 . John Spencer covenanted to convey to the s' 1 . Tho : Bennett or such 
other persons as he should appoint. 

The maiinor of Quidhampton in com' Wilts' and the parcells 
of land called the Overfields & the Croft parcell of the mannor 
[ofj Cancourt in Elindon alias Wroughton & Liddiard Tregose 
in com' Wilts' free from incumbrances (except as in the Articles is 
excepted). 
And in consideracion thereof Bennett paid to Spencer 200". at sealing 
the Articles and covenanted to pay 2300 1 '. more as in the Articles. 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 227 



(46) 

21 Sept™. 1648. By Indenture Between the s d . John Spencer of 
the one part & the s a . Tho : Bennett of the other part Reciteing the s d . 
Articles and that the s d . Jn°. Spencer in pursueance thereof had by the 
appointment of the s d . Tho : Bennett by Bargain & Sale of the same date 
herewith Bargained & Sold the said mannor farm and lands &c. to W m . 
Stede Do r . of Laws Mathew Bennett & Thomas Gregory Esq. (att the 
sealing of which Bargain & Sale the s d . Tho : Bennett had paid 700 u 
besides 200 1 '. paid at sealing the Articles in part of 2500" agreed to be 
the full purchase money And Reciteing that John Spencer by the deed of 
the 16 March 1642 before mencioned had demised to the s d . Sadler & 
Spencer the s d . manor farm and premisses subject to the Provisoes & 
Trusts therein The Indenture witnessed That it was agreed between the 
s d . partys And the s d . John Spencer did thereby appoint that s d . Thomas 
Bennett should pay 1600 1 ' then remaineing in his hands of the purchase 
money to Richard Spencer & Mary Spencer brother & sister of s d . Jn°. 
Spencer their executors &c. in full satisfaccion of their legacys (viz 1 .) to 
Mary Spencer her executors &c. 750". on 7 th Dec r . then next and to s d 
Richard Spenser 850 u on 12th June then next for makeing void the s d 
recited lease of 16 March 1642 : Or otherwise that the premisses might 
be assigned by Sadler & Spencer to the s d . Thomas Bennett his executors 
•&c. with usuall covenants. 

(Note) this is but the Counterpart. Q the originall. 



(47). 

Eodem die. By Indenture inrolled in Chancery Between John 
Spencer Esq r . son & heir of John Spencer of the one part and William 
Stede Do r . of Laws Mathew Bennett Clerk & Tho : Gregory Esq/, of the 
other part The s d . John Spencer in consideracion of 2500 1 ' paid him by 
the s d . W'". Stede Mathew Bennett & Thomas Gregory Did grant bargain 
sell alien enfeoffe & confirrne to the s d . William Stede Mathew Bennett 
& Thomas Gregory their heirs and assignes. 

All that the mannor lordshipp and farme of Quidhampton cum 

pertinenciis in Wroughton alias Elindon in Com' Wilts' as the same 

were held by Rich d . Spencer grandfather of the s d Jn°. Spencer or to 

him demised, Overfeilds and the Croft one containing 40 acres and 

the other 20 acres, one other feild or croft containing 4 acres which 

three feilds did belong to the capitall messuage & farm of Cancourt 

in Lidiard Tregose in Com' Wilts' late in possession of Rich d . Spencer 

To hold to the s d . W m . Stede Mathew Bennett &Tho: Gregory their 

heirs & assignes for ever. With a generall warranty against the s d . 

Jn° Spencer & his heirs and a covenant declareing the uses of all fines 

recoverys &c, to be to the use of the s d . grantees their heirs & assignes 

and to no other use. 



228 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

(48) 
Eeodem die. By Indenture Between John Spencer son & heir of 
Jn 9 . Spencer deceased of the one part and W m Stede Mathew Bennett 
& Thomas Gregory Esq re . of the other part, Reciteing the Bargain & Sale 
above mencioned The Indenture witnessed that the s d . Jn°. Spencer 
covenanted with the s d . W m Stede Mathew Bennett and Tho : Gregory 
That he was seized of an estate in fee of the premisses conveyed to them 
by the Indenture of Bargain and Sale above mencioned free from in- 
cumbrances or any former grant Except a rent charge of 80". which John 
Spencer deceased by the Indenture of the 6th Jan r >'. 18 James 1st made 
between the s d . Jn". Spencer deceased of the one part & S r George Ayliffe 
Kn'. & Tho : Ayliffe gent' sons of Jn° Ayliffe Esq r . of the other part in 
consideracion of a marriage did grant to the s d . Geo : Ayliffe & Tho i 
Ayliffe to be received imediately after the decease of the s d . Jn°. Spencer 
for 99 years if Anne one of the daughters of the s d . Jn°. Ayliffe and after- 
wards wife of the s d . Jn° Spencer deceased & mother of John Spencer th& 
grantor & wife of Jn°. Grayham should survive the said Jn°. Spencer 
deceased and should so long live to be paid quarterly with a forfeiture or 
nomine pene put in that Indenture And alsoe except a lease dated 
16 March 18 Car : 1 : before mencioned of the said mannor farm &• 
premisses for 99 years at a pepper corn rent under severall provisoes and 
condicions therein contained And also except a lease made by the said 
John Spencer the son to Richard Jacob for holding the premisses from 
Lady Day then last for two years at the rent of 170 u per annum which 
rent was agreed to be paid to the s d . William Stede Mathew Bennett & 
Tho : Gregory their heirs & assignes with other usuall covenants. 

(49) 
24 th Aug*. 1650. By Indenture Between W m . Sadler gent' and 
Richard Spencer of the one part and Thomas Bennett of the other part 
Reciteing the lease of the 16 March 1642 before mencioned from the s d . 
John Spencer the son to W m . Sadler and Richard Spencer of the said 
mannor of Quidhampton for 99 years subject to the provisoes and 
condicions for makeing void the same as is therein mentioned And that 
Thomas Bennett purchased the premisses and had out of the purchase 
money paid the severall porcions given to Richard Spencer & Mary 
Spencer children of John Spencer the father by his will The Indenture 
witnessed that the said William Sadler and Richard Spencer Did at the 
desire of the said Jn°. Spencer the son grant assigne and sett over unto 
the s d . Thomas Bennett the s d . recited Indenture of Lease and the s d .. 
mannor and premisses thereby demised and all their estate and interest 
therein for the s cI . term of 99 years To hold to the said Thomas 
Bennett his executors &c. for the residue of the s a . terme. 

(50) 
10 Sept. This Indenture made the Tenth Day of September in the 
A.D. 1658. yeare of our Lord God One Thousand Six Hundred ffiftie and 
Eight Beetweene William Stede of Stedehill in the County of 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 229 

Kent Docto' of Lawes Matthew Benet of London Clerke & Thomas 
Gregorie of Hordley in the County of Oxford Esq. on the one part and 
Thomas Benet of Salthrop in the County of Wilts Doctor of Lawes on 
the other part Witnesseth. that the said William Stede Matthew Benet 
& Thomas Gregorie for & in Consideraeion of a competent Summe of 
Money to them in hand paid before the ensealing & Deliverie hereof by 
the said Thomas Benet, the receipt whereof they doe by these presents 
acknowledge and themselves to be thereof and therewith satisfied & 
payd Haue bargained & sold, aliened & confirmed, and by these 
presents doe bargaine and sell aliene and confirme vnto the said Thomas 
Benet his Heyres & Assignes for ever All that the Manno r Lordship & 
Farme of Quidhampton with Thappurtenaunces scituate & being in or 
neare the Parish of Wroughton in the County of Wiltes And all and 
singular the Messuages, Buildings, Gardens, Oarchyards, Courts Yards 
Curtilages Lands Tenements Meadowes, Pastures ffeedings, Woods 
Underwoods, Trees, Commons, Fishings, Wasts, Bents Keuercions, 
Seruices Profitts Commodityes & Hereditaments whatsoeuer to the said 
Mannor Lordshipp or ffarme belonging or he[re]tofore held occupied or 
«nioyed by John Spencer of Bradwell Hall in the County of Essex Esq r 
or his Assignes or Predecesso rs or to him or them Demised as part parcell 
or Member of the same And allsoe all those three seuerall Fields of 
Arable & Pasture commonly called or knowne by the names of the Over- 
fields & the Croft or by any other names whatsoever with all and singular 
theyr Appurtenaunces which sometimes were parcel of the Capitall 
Messuage & ffarme of Can Court in the Parish of Lydiard Tregose in the 
said County of Wiltes & by them lately purchased of the said John 
Spencer And allsoe All the Timber Trees Hedgrowes woods & under- 
woods growing & being vpon the same Togeather with all Barnes Stables 
Outhowses & Buildings vpon the premisses whatsoever : And allsoe all 
other the Messuages Lands & Tenements of them the said William Stede 
Matthew Benet & Thomas Gregory soe purchased as aforesaid within 
the said parishes of Wroughton & Lydiard by whatsoeuer other name or 
names the same are called or knowne with their and euery of their 
Appurtenaunces. And allsoe the Beuercion & Reuercions Remainder and 
Remay[n]ders of all & singular the said Lordshipp Manno r , ffarme Lands 
■ & premisses, & of euery part & parcell thereof And all Rents & Profitts 
due or payable for the same. Togeather with all Deeds Charters Euidences 
Writings Terrars Escripts & Miniments touching the said bargained 
premisses or any part thereof And allsoe all Thestate Right, Title 
Interest use Possession Clayme & Demaund whatsoeuer of them the said 
William Stede Matthew Benet & Thomas Gregory of in & to the same 
or any part or parcell thereof To haue and to hold the said Manno r 
Lordshipp ffarme Lands, Tenements, & all & singular other the premisses 
by these presents bargayned or sold or mencioned or intended to be 
hereby bargayned & sold with their & euery of their Appurtenaunces 
vnto the said Thomas Benet his heyres & Assignes for euer to the only 
proper vse & behoofe of him the said Thomas Benet his Heyres & Assignes 
for euer In witnesse whereof the parties firste abouenamed to these 



230 The Society's MSS. Qaidhampton. 

presents interchangeably haue sett their hands & seales the day and 
yeare first aboue written 

William Stede Matthew Benet Tho' Gregory 

(Endorsed) 

Sealed and delivered by the within named William Stede in the 
presence of 

Andrew Yetman Edward Godfary 

Sealed and delivered by the within named Matthew Benet & Thomas 
Gregory in the presence of 

Joseph Colston Henry Gregory Ei' Butler 

Nof Pub'" 
Inrolled in Chancery the fourth day of October in the yeare within 
written By Henry Edwards 

Numbered " 49." 

No. 127. 

Note. 

It appears by one of the above documents (No. 27) — the original 
is not in the Society's possession, and the text of it, as printed, is 
derived from the " Abstract " — that some years before his death 
Thomas Crane had enfeoffed Edward Penruddock and others of 
the manor of Quidhampfcon, to the use of Elizabeth, his eldest 
daughter, in tail, with remainder to Sarah, his second daughter, 
with other remainders over, but reserving power to himself 
to void the settlement. By his will (No. 28), however, he gave 
the manor to his daughter Sarah in tail, with remainder to 
his daughter Elizabeth, then wife of David Waterhouse, &c, 
and it is evident, accordingly, that he had in the interval exercised 
the power reserved to him, and had revoked, or believed that he 
had revoked, his former gift. How or when he accomplished this 
does not appear from any of our documents, nor is there any very 
distinct indication in them that the fact of such revocation, or its 
validity, had been disputed ; though possibly, from the indenture 
(No. 30), leading the use of a fine (No. 31), it might reasonably 
be inferred that some confirmation of the title has been considered 
necessary. 

It is interesting, therefore, to find a " bill " filed in Chancery by 
David Waterhouse, with the accompanying " answer," which un- 
doubtedly form part of litigation instituted by him to ascertain 
his wife's rights under the prior settlement. 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 232 

Abstracts of both documents are appended :— 

Complaint of David Waterhouse and Elizabeth his wife one of the 
daughters of Thomas Crane, late of Newton Tony, co. "Wilts, esq. 
Whereas the said David and Elizabeth in the right of the said 
Elizabeth are seised in fee simple or of some other estate of inheri- 
tance of the reversion of the manor or farm of Quidhampton in the 
said county by force of a conveyance thereof made by the said 
Thomas Crane in his lifetime and before the marriage between the 
said David and Elizabeth of the reversion thereof to divers persons 
" to your said orators unknowne " to the use of the said Elizabeth 
Waterhouse by the name of Elizabeth Crane and her heirs for ever 
or to the heirs of her body lawfully begotten or of some other estate 
of inheritance " as your said orators doubt not sufficiently to prove 
in this honourable court " ; in which assurance or conveyance there 
is said to be contained a proviso whereby the said Thomas Crane 
during a certain time therein limited upon payment or tender of a 
certain sum of money at the fount stone in the Temple Church might 
revoke or alter the said uses so limited as aforesaid to the said Elizabeth ; 
Now it is that, notwithstanding the said Thomas Crane nor any other 
for him, did not make any such tender or payment of intent to revoke 
or alter the said uses, one Eoger Cope of London, glasier, combining and 
confederating with some other persons " to your oratours unknown ' r 
how to disinherit and defraud the said Elizabeth of the said reversion and 
to entitle some others thereto have agreed amongst themselves to give 
out and publish, and the said Eoger doth give out that the said Thomas 
Crane did within these three years last past, being as is said within the 
time in the said conveyance limited, revoke the said use and that the 
said Roger Cope did tender or pay for or in the name of the said Thomas 
Crane the said sum at the said place to the intent that the use so 
limited to the said Elizabeth might be revoked and made void ; whereas 
in truth there never was within that time any such tender or payment 
of money at the said place made by the said Eoger, as he the said 
Eoger hath divers times protested to the said David Waterhouse and 
particularly about the beginning of December last in the presence of 
divers credible witnesses, before whom, being required to speak the truth 
concerning the premisses to be writ down and his mark to be set to it, 
as he would be ready to justify upon his oath, he answered in sort fol- 
lowing, viz, being asked whether he was witness at any tender or 
payment of money by Thomas Crane late of Newton Tony, esq. within 
two or three years then last past at the font stone in the Temple Church, 
he said that he was not of his certain remembrance ; being likewise 
asked whether he did, within the time, at the place aforesaid or any 
other place, at the request and in the name of the said Thomas, tender 
or pay any such sum, he said likewise of his certain knowledge he did 
not, but said that about two years then last past one Mr. William Lockey 
did intreat the said Eoger to go with him into the said Temple Church 
to be witness to some money that was to be paid or received by the said 



232 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

William, but to what end or purpose the said money was to be paid or 
received he could not tell, but said of his plain knowledge there was 
no money paid, received, or tendered by him the said Roger, and 
in to showing thereof did subscribe his mark ; which note so subscribed 
the said David hath ready to show to "this honourable court" 
subscribed by divers credible witnesses. In consideration whereof and 
as the said former untrue reportes be very slaunderous to " your said 
orators" title and right to the premisses and may tend to their 
disinherison if the combination and confederacy aforesaid should not be 
discovered, and for that " your orators " verily think that the said Roger 
will not only upon his oath confess his said former speeches so by him 
subscribed unto as aforesaid in the presence of so many witnesses but 
will also discover who they be their names and dwellings which have so 
combined and confederated with him ; pray that the writ of Subpena 
may be directed to the said Roger. 

In margin. 11th March, 1596. 

The answer of Roger Cope, defendant, to the bill of complaint of 
David Waterhouse and Elizabeth his wife complainants. He never 
combined nor did confederat with any man to defraud the said com- 
plainants of the said reversion. He hath not given out that the said 
Thomas Crane did revoke within the last three years the use mentioned 
or any use. He never tendered or paid the said sum in the name of the 
said Thomas, so that the use limited to the said Elizabeth might be re- 
voked, neither was there any such tender or payment at the place men- 
tioned made by him. It is true that he hath sundry times protested as 
much to the said David Waterhouse, specially at one time before Chrismas 
last in the presence of one Mr. Milner and others he was required by 
by the Complainant to deliver the truth concerning the said tender. 
What he answered was written down, read to him and he put his mark 
to it, to the effect as in the bill mentioned and refers himself to said note. 
Whether the said William Lockey said money was to be received or paid 
he does not well remember, nor to what end or purpose. He came with 
the said Lockey to the Temple Church " and they then walking about in 
the round isle there the said William as he remembreth prayed this defen- 
dant to beare witnesse that he was there to demaund money on his 
brother's behalf and then presently they departed thence againe." No 
money was then paid, tendered or received in his presence 

In margin. Sworn 12 March, 1596. 

Chancery Proceedings. Elizabeth. W. 11, 45. 

Our information with regard to the suit is limited to these two 
documents. Whether it was dismissed, as appears more probable; 
or compounded, we have no means of knowing; but the title of 
any future purchaser was secured by the instruments (Nos. 30 and 
31) already referred to. 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 233 

. The pedigree of the family of Waterhouse has been subjected to 
the most minute investigations, the fruits of which, in MS., are to 
be found in the British Museum and in certain volumes presented 
to the Library of the Public Eecord Office. From the latter source 
it appears that David Waterhouse was the seventh son of 
John Waterhouse, of the Moote Hall, in Halifax, by Jane, 
daughter and heir of Thomas Bosvile, of Coningsborough, and 
grandson of Bobert Waterhouse, of the same, by Sibil, daughter 
and co-heir of Bobert Savile, of Shibden Hall, by Janet, daughter 
and heir of William Otes, of Shibden. For education the family 
resorted to University College, Oxford (there are, apparently, 
seven matriculations of persons of the name at this college before 
1715), from which Philip Waterhouse, elder brother of David, 
took his degree. David himself matriculated from University 
College 1st Dec, 1581, aged 17, was called to the bar at the Inner 
Temple, 11th Feb., 1592-3, and became a bencher of that society, 
16th June, 1605. He sat in Parliament for Berwick (1601) and 
Aldborough (1588-9), and is described as "of Ogwell Hall, in the 
parish of Birstall, esq." By his wife, Elizabeth Crane, he had 
issue John Waterhouse, admitted to the Inner Temple 27th 
January, 1610-11, who died apparently young and without 
issue ; Theodore, who matriculated from University College, 
■6th May, 1624, aged 17 ; Philip, of London, stationer (will 
dated 1st, proved 9th Jan., 1631-2); Bobert, died young; 
David ; Joseph ; and three daughters, Catherine, Elizabeth, and 
Mary, who all died young. He was a stirring man, who attained, 
evidently, a considerable measure of success in the world, and the 
concluding note is the more lamentable : — " He became a bankrupt 
and in his ruin involved nearly the whole family." 



Salthrop. 



We have thus conducted the Manor of Quidhampton across 
three hundred and eighty years from Bichard de Hyweye- 
to Dr. Thomas Benet. With regard to Salthrop, the residence in 
North Wilts of this family of Benet, and the house where these 

VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. R 



234 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

documents were stored, the "abstract" is silent; and among the I 
MSS. presented to the Society by Mr. Mullings a solitary receipt ij 
is all that occurs to illustrate its history : — 

No. 51. 
9 Nov. Nono die Novembris A E. R. Caroli secundo 
1626. 

Salthroppe SS. Beceved the daye & yeare above wrytten of William I 
in Coin' "Wiltes Yorke ffarmer there the iuste somme of ffortye & Eight >i 
shillinges for the arrerages of a rent of Two shillinges per 
annum due & payable to his Ma ,vr forth of the said ffarme in the right 
of his highnes Dutchy of Lancaster being in arrere for Twenty ffowre- 
yeres ended att the feast of S' Mychaell the Arkangell last past In 
wytnes whereof I have herevnto sett my hand & the Seale of myne offyce 
the daye & yere first above wrytten 

per me Ed : Maskelyne ffeodarium Domini 
Regis Ducatus sui Lancastrie in comitatu. 
predicto. 

Seal, faint impression on payer over ivax. 

Endorsed. An Acquyttance for M r . W 1 ". Yorke. 

No. 135. 

Cockhakis alias Quintens in Costowe. 

"We turn, next under guidance of the "abstract," to other, and 
earlier, acquisitions made by the Benet family in this neigh- 
bourhood, viz. : — (1) the ancient holding in Costowe, in the 
parish of Wroughton, of the Quintan family, (2) the ancient 
holding in the same place of the abbots of Stanley. 

We know that by letters patent 7th June, 28 Henry VII (153fS 
the King granted inter alia the manors of Mydgehall, Studley an 
Costowe, parcels of the possessions of the late dissolved abbey of 
Stanley, to Edward, viscount Beauchamp, and Anne, his wife, 
with remainders over. It is a fair inference from what follows that 
the abbey estate in Costowe was, at that time, in lease to one John 
Sadler. In July, 1539, this same John Sadler took a lease for 
long term, from Michael Quintin of a messuage and yard land in 
Costowe called " Cokharys," as appears by the document (No. 52) 
first below. This is, without doubt, the same property which, by 
the description of a toft in Wroughton with its appurtenances in 




" " * - I . ' > «*■ /'Y-J f i' 



& 



-tr* 




{*>%&*-> 







-yyt. 












Keceipt (p. 234) for rent due to Duchy of Lancaster from Salthrop [enlarged £]. 
NoTE.-The Society is indebted to Mr. A. S. Maskelyne for the kind gift of the plate illustrating this deed, as well as for that illustrating the Chirograph of ,268-9, facing page 90. 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 235 

the West and East fields there called " Salthroppefildes," the said 

Michael subsequently sells to Agnes Sadler, John's widow, and 

Thomas Sadler, her son : and the same property which in 1597, 

Anthony Sadler, son and heir of the above Thomas, sells, by the 

description of a tenement and toft in Costow, within the parish of 

Wroughton, called " Cokharris alias Quintens," to William Benett 

of Marston : — 

(52) 

4 July This Indentur made the iiij th daye of July in the xxxj"' yer 
A.D. 1539. of the reigne of our most dredd souerayne lorde Henry the 
virj lh byth grace of god Kynge of England and of ffrance defen- 
dour of the ffeyth lorde of Ireland and in erth supreme hedd of the Church 
of England betwene Mighell Quynten Sun and heyre of John Quynten 
late of Bupton in the parysh of Cleff Pippard in the Countie of Wiltes 
gent' of that oone partie And John Sadler of Costowe within the parysh 
of Wroughton in the seid Countie yoman of that other partie Witnessitlx 
that the forseid Mighell Quynten for the sum of .vj. li. xiij.s. iiij.d. of 
good and lawfull money of England to hym in handes payd at thensealyng 
of theise presentes wherof and wherwith he knowledgith hymselff well 
and truely satysfyed contentyd and payd and the seid John Sadler and 
his executours therof to be dischargid and acquyetid by theis presentes 
Hath sett dymysed grauntid and to ferine letton And by theise presentes 
settith dymysith grauntith and to fferme lettith vnto the seid John Sadler 
all that hys Mesuage and oone yerd landes Sett lyeing and beyng in 
Costowe within the parysh of Wroughton forseid callyd Cokharrys, 
withallmaner landes medowys lesuys pasturs Closes and Commons of 
pastur to the seid Mesuage belongeng or yn anymaner of wyse apper- 
teynyng w'all and singler ther pertinaunces To haue and to holde all 
the seid Mesuage and yerdlandes callyd Cokharys with allmaner of landes 
medowys lesuys pasturys Closes and Commons of pastur to the forseid 
mesuage belongeng or in anymaner of wyse apperteynyng with all and 
singler ther pertinaunces to the seid John Sadler and to his executours 
and assignes from the fest of Seynt Mighell tharehaungell next to comme 
after the Date of theise presentes vnto the full end and terme of ffyfftye 
yerys and oone yer then next after ensueng and fully to be complete and 
ended Yeldyng and payeng therfor yerely to the forseid Mighell 
Quynten and to his heyres and assignes ffyfftye thre shelynges and ffoure 
pens of good and lauffull money of England yt to be payd at two termes 
of the yer, that ys to sey at the ffestes of thannunciacion of our lady 
Virgynn and Seynt Mighell tharehaungell by evyn porcions Duryng 
the which terme the forseid John Sadler and his executours and assignes 
all the forseid Mesuage, well and sufficiently shall uphold Maynten and 
repayre Allmaner of Hedgis and boundes aswel quyck as dedd abought 
the same and all other the premisses well and sufficiently shall Maynten 
and norysh, and in thend of ther seid terme, all the premisses well and 

R 2 



J The Society s MSS. Quidhampton. 

sufficiently Repayred Mayntenyd and noryshed shall leaue and surrendr 
at ther owne proper costes and expences Takyng allwey sufficient Hedge- 
boote and the offall of the same, in and vppon the premisses, without 
any contradiccion or denyeng of the seid Mighell and his hej'res or any 
other in ther name And yff yt shall so happen the forseid Rent of 
liij.s. iiij.d. to be behynd nat payd in parte or in all after any of the 
forseid testes at the which yt ought to be payd, by the space of oyght 
weekys yf yt be lawffully askyd, Or yff any wyllfull waste be doone in 
or uppon the foreseid Mesuage and other the premisses with ther perti- 
naunces by the seid John his executours or assignes, and no sufficient 
distres can be founde in and uppon the seid sesuage (sic) and other the 
premisses with ther pertinaunces. That then yt shalbe lauffull to the 
foreseid Mighell Quynten and to his heyres and assignes into all the 
forseid Mesuage and other the premisses with ther pertinaunces to re- 
entre and ther olde estate therin to haue ayen and the seid John Sadler 
and his executours and assignes ther from and from euery parcell of the 
same to expell and amove theise Indenturs in anywyse natwithstandyng 
And for the true performaunce of all the forseid Covenauntes well and 
truely of the partie and behalff of the forseid Mighell Quynten and his 
heyres, to be obseruyd performyd and fullfyllyd ayenst the seid John 
Sadler and his executours and assignes The same Mighell Quynten 
byndith hymselff his heyres and executours to the seid John Sadler and 
to his executours and assignes in the Summe of xx". li. Sterlyng in his 
wryting obligatory beryng this present date In wittnes wherof eyther 
of the parties aboueseid to theise Indenturs interchaungeable haue putt 
ther sealys Datid the daye and yer aboue wrytton 

bacster 

N W 

by me Myzhell Quyten 

Endorsed Costow No. 1. 

No. 101. 

(53) 
12 Feb? 1560. [1560-1]. Bond from Michael Quintyn of Bubton in 
the parish of Clevepeper in com' Wilts' Esq r to Agnes Sadler and The- : 
Sadler in 500 u penalty with condicion reciteing that Michael Quintyn in 
consideracion of 150 1 ' had granted bargained aliened and sold unto 
the said Agnes and Thomas Sadler and to the heirs and assignes of the 
s d . Thomas Sadler 

A Toft in Elinden alias Wroughton in com' Wilts' and 34 acres 
of arable land in Wroughton cum pertinenciis then in the tenure of 
the said Agnes and Thomas 

Therefore if the s d . Michael Quintin and his heires before Lady day 
then next did convey & assure unto the said Agnes & Thomas & the heirs 
& assignes of the s d . Thomas a good estate in fee and make further 
assureance if required free from incumbrances and deliver writings or 
copys necessary for the defence of the title Then the bond to be void. 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 237 

(54) 
16 February Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos hoc presens scriptum 
1560-1. pervenerit Michaell Quintyn de Bupton in parochia de Cleve 
Pipper in comitatu Wiltes' salutem in Domino sempiternam 
Sciatis me prefatum Michaelem Quintyn tarn in consideracione et 
pro summa centum et quinquaginta librarum bone et legalis monete 
Anglie mihi per quosdam Agnetem Sadler de Costowe in parochia de 
Ellingdon alias Wroughton in comitatu predicto viduam et Thomam 
Sadler filium suum de eadem yoinanbeneetfideliter premanibuspersoluta 
TTnde fateor me esse fore satisfactum et contentatum dictosque Agnetem 
Sadler et Thomam Sadler heredes executores et administratores suos 
inde acquietatos et exoneratos esse imperpetuum per presentes quam pro 
diversis aliis causis et consideracionibus me specialiter moventibus 
Dedisse concessisse barganizasse vendidisse demississe deliberasse et hoc 
presenti scripto meo confirmasse prefatis Agneti Sadler et Thome Sadler 
filio suo et heredibus et assignatis ipsius Thome Sadler imperpetuum 
Totum illud toftum meum jacens et existens in Wroughton in comitatu 
Wiltes' et triginta et quatuor acras terre arrabilis jacentes et existentes 
in campis de Occident' et oriental' ibidem vocatis sive nuncupatis 
Saltroppefildes in Wroughton predicta, viginti acras prati viginti et 
septern acras pasture cum pertinenciis suis in Wroughton predicta 
Aceciam omnia alia terras et tenementa mea prata pascua pasturas boscos 
subboscos redditus reverciones et servicia ac alia hereditamenta mea 
quecumque eidem tofto spectancia sive pertinencia jacentia et existencia 
in parochia et campis de Wroughton predicta in comitatu predicto cum 
omnibus et singulis suis pertinenciis inodo vel nuper in tenura sive 
occupacione ipsorum predictorum Agnetis et Thome vel assignatorum 
eorum Habendum tenendum et gaudendum predictum toftum terras 
tenementa prata pascua pasturas boscos subboscos redditus reverciones 
et servicia ac alia hereditamenta quecumque cum omnibus et singulis 
suis pertinenciis superius specificatis prefatis Agneti Sadler et Thome 
Sadler et heredibus et assignatis ipsius Thome Sadler ad solum et proprium 
opus et usum ipsorum Agnetis Sadler et Thome et heredum et assigna- 
torum ipsius Thome Sadler imperpetuum Tenendum de capitalibus 
dominis feodi illius per servicia inde prius debita et de jure consueta 
Et ego vero predictus Michaell Quyntyn et heredes mei predicta toftum 
terras tenementa et omnia et singula alia premissa cum suis pertinenciis 
prefatis Agneti Sadler et Thome Sadler ac heredibus et assignatis ipsius 
Thome Sadler contra omnes gentes warrantizabimus et imperpetuum 
defendemus per presentes Et insuper Sciatis me prefatum Michaelem 
Quyntyn fecisse ordinasse attornasse deputasse ac in loco meo posuisse 
et constituisse dileetos mihi in Christo Zachariam Pledell gentilman 
Johannem Welles et Willelmum Sadler Yoemen meos veros et legitimos 
attornatos conjunctim et divisim ad intrandum vice pro me et nomine 
meo in predictum toftum ac omnia et singula alia premissa cum suis 
pertinenciis superius specificatis possessionemque et seisinam inde 
capiendum Et post hujusmodi ac introitum ac possessionem et seisinam 
sic inde captos et habitos de inde ad deliberandum viee pro me et nomine 



238 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

rneo plenain et pacificam possessionem et seisinam omnium et singulorum 
premissorum cum suis pertinenciis prefatis Agneti Sadler et Thome 
Sadler aut eorum certis in hac parte attornatis juxta et secundum tenorem 
vim formam et effectum hujus presentis carte mee inde confecte Ratum 
et gratum habentem et habiturum totum et quicquid dicti attornati mei 
vice pro me et nomine meo fecerint aut alter eorum feeerit de et ini- 
premissis per presentes In cujus rei testimonium huic presenti scripto 
meo ego predictus Miehaell Quyntyn sigillum meum apposui Datum 
decimo sexto die februarii anno regni domine Elizabethe dei gracia Anglie 
ffrauncie et Hibernie regine fidei defensoris &c. tercio /1560/ 
by me Mychall Quynten 

Gaynsforde notar'. 
Endorsed Possession and season taken of all & singler the premisses 
within written the twelf daie of Marche the yere within written and 
agayne delivered according to the effect of this present dede in the 
presentes of John Pledell gentilman John Sawer John Chesterman 
Adrian Frye George Smyth John Kember John Telling Gorge Sadler 
cum aliis. 

No. 102. 

(55) 
Last Feb'*. 3 Eliz : 1560 [1560-1] Deed poll whereby Michael 
Quintyn Eeciteing |that he had by feoffment of the 16 th Feb"' 3 Eliz. 
conveyed to Agnes Sadler and Tho : Sadler 

A toft in Wroughton and 34 acres of arable land lyeing in the j 
East and Westfeilds called Salthrop in Wroughton [& 34 acres of 
arable land lyeing in the Eastfeilds called Salthrop in Wroughton i 
(sic)] 20 acres of meadow 27 acres of pasture and all other lands to i 
the s d . toft belonging, the s a Michael Quintyn did remise release and 
for ever quittclaime unto Agnes and Thomas Sadler 
All his right title interest claime possession & demand whatsoever , 
which he ever had then had or should have in the s d . toft and premisses, 
with a warranty against all Nations (sic). 

(56) 
16 July, 39 Eliz": 1597 By Indenture Between Anthony Sadler 
yeoman of the one part and William Bennett gent' of the other part the 
said Anthony Sadler in consideracion of 600 1 '. paid him by the s d . W nl . 
Bennett Did graunt bargaine alienate & sell unto the s d . W ra . Bennett 
his heires and Assignes 

All that tenement & toft sett lyeing & being in Costow in the; 
parish of Wroughton called Cockharis alias Quintens and all tbej 
arable lands meadows pastures closes woods underwoods & otheri 
appurtenaunces to the s d tenement belonging in the tenure of the s 6 . 
Anthony Sadler 
To hold unto the s d W' n . Bennett his heirs & assignes to the only use 
& behoofe of the s d . Wm". Bennett his heirs and assignes for ever witi 
usuall covenants. Livery of seisin endorsed. 



i 



The Society's MSS. Quiclhampton. 239 

(57) 
16 July Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos hoc presens scriptum 
1S97. pervenerit Anthonius Sadler de Costoe Infra parochiam de 
Wroughton in Comitatu Wiltes yeoman. Salutem in domino 
sempiternam. Sciatis me prefatum Anthonium Sadler pro et in con- 
scideracione Sexcentum Librarum bone et legalis monete Anglie mihi 
prefato Anthonio Sadler ad sigillationem presentium bene et fideliter per 
Wilhelmum Benett de Maston in comitatu predicto generosum persolu- 
tarum et satisfactarum dedisse ffeoffasse concessisse librasse et hoc 
presenti scripto meo plenarie confirmasse prefato Willelmo Benett 
heredibus et Assignatis suis totum illud Tenementum et Toftum iacentia 
et existentia in Costow predicta infra parochiam de Wroughton predictam 
modo vel nuper vocata Cokharis alias Quintens et omnia terras prata 
pasturas Communia boscos subboscos et alia hereditamenta cum suis 
pertinenciis quecunque eidern Tenemento iacentia sive pertinentia modo 
in tenura sive occupacione predicti Anthonij Sadler seu Assignatorum 
suorum Habendum et tenendum Tenementum et Toftum predicta et 
omnia et singula alia premissa superius speeificata cum suis pertinenciis 
prefato Willelmo Benett heredibus et Assignatis suis ad solum opus et 
usum ipsorum Willelmi Benett heredum et assignatorum suorum im- 
perpetuum Tenendum de capitali sive capitalibus Dominis ffeodi illius 
per redditus et servicia inde prius debita et de iure consueta Et ego 
prefatus Anthonius Sadler pro me et heredibus meis omnia et singula 
premissa cum suis pertinenciis prefato Willelmo Benett heredibus et 
assignatis suis modo et forma [predictis] contra me prefatum Anthonium 
heredes et Assignatos meos et contra omnes gentes warantizabo et im- 
perpetuum per presentes defendam In Cuius rei testimonium sigillo (sic) 
meo apposui. Datum decimo sexto die Julij Anno Regni Domine nostre 
Elizabethe dei gratia Anglie ffrauncie et Hibernie Begine fidei Defensoris 
Tricessimo Nono./ 

Anthony Sadler 
Sealed and deliuered in the presens of vs 

Griffin Cuetets. Joh : Sadler. 

William Sadluu Richard Kemme. 

(by mark) 
Endorsed M d . that possession and seisin was deliuerid by the w"'in 
named Anthony Sadler to w th in named William Bennett accordinge to 
the purport & true meanyng of these presentes the day & yere w th in 
written in the presens of vs 

Griffin Cuuteys. Joh : Sadler. 

Bichabd Kemes rnarke. William Sadler. 

i. 7. 

No. 104. 

Costowe Farm. 

We come next to what had been the estate of the abbots of 
Stanley, now vested in the Seymours. We have suggested that 



240 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

John Sadler was tenant of this estate under the abbey. The first 
document relating to it in the present series is a lease of it for 
lives by Lord Hertford to Thomas Sadler: — 

(68) 

1 Sept. This Indenture made the firste daye of September in the 
1587. Nine and Twentithe yeare of the raigne of our most gracious 
soueraigne Ladye Elizabethe by the grace of God Queene of 
Englande Fraunce and Irelande defender of the faith &c, Betweene the 
Eight Honorable S r Edward Seymour knight Baron Beauchampe, and 
Earle of Hertforde of thone partie And Thomas Sadler of Costowe in the 
Countye of Wiltess' yornan, Anthonye Sadler and William Sadler sonnes 
of the saide Thomas Sadler of the other partie Witnesseth that the 
said Earle for and in consideracion of the some of fower hundrethe 
powndes of good and lawfull money of Englande to him the said Earle 
by the saide Thomas Sadler in the name of a fine, or income before 
thensealinge of theise presentes well and trulie paide whereof and where- 
with the said Earle doth acknowledge himselfe to be fullie contented and 
satisfied, and thereof and of everie parte and parcell thereof dothe clerelye 
acquite and discharge the saide Thomas Sadler his executors and ad- 
ministrators and everie of them by theise presentes Hath demised 
betaken and to farme letten, and by these presentes dothe demise, betake, 
and to farme lett unto the saide Thomas Sadler, Annthonye Sadler and 
William Sadler all those his Messuage and Tofte hertofore demised called 
or knowen by the name of two tenementes scituate lyinge and beinge in 
Costowe aforesaide neere unto the saide Earles grange called Studley 
grange in the sayde Countye of Wiltess' together with all orchardes, 
gardens, inwarde and outwarde courtes or yardes, howses edifices 
buyldinges, barnes and stables and all other his arable lande, meadowes, 
pastures, feadinges, and other hereditamentes to the saide Messuage and 
Tofte or two tenementes or to either of them belonginge or in anie wise 
apperteyninge, lyinge and beinge within the parishe of Wroughton in i 
the saide Countye of Wiltess' and now or late in the tenure manurance ! 
or occupacion of the said Thomas Sadler his assignes or lesses (Except i 
and allwayes reserved unto the said Earle his heires and assignes all i 
mettalles mynes and quarreyes, and all woodes underwoodes, tymber i 
trees and other great trees (savinge fruite trees) now or hereafter ) 
standinge, growinge, renewinge, or beinge, in or upon the saide premisses i 
or anye parte or parcell thereof, And allso excepte and likewise reserved I 
unto the saide Earle his heires and assignes all manner of fowle, hawkes . 
and herons from tyme to tyme, bredinge or keepinge in or upon the said 
premisses by theise presentes demysed together with free liberty of | 
fisshinge, fowlinge, hawkinge and huntinge at all manner of game to ' 
and for the said Earle his heires and assignes, and his and theire 
servantes, in and upon the saide premisses To have hold occupie and i 
enjoye the said messuage and tofte or two tenementes, and all other the i 
premisses before by theise presentes demised with all and singuler theire j 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 241 

appurtenaunces (Except before excepted) unto the saide Thomas Sadler, 
Anthony Sadler, and William Sadler for terme of their three lives, and 
the life of everie of them longest lyvinge Yealdinge and payinge 
therefore yearely duringe the saide terme the yerelie rent of fower 
poundes eight shillinges and fower pence of good and lawfull money of 
England© at two feastes or termes in the yeare most usuall that is to 
saye at the feaste of St. Michaell tharchangell and the Annunciacion of 
the blessed Virgin St. Marye by even and equall porcions Provided 
allwayes if it shall happen the saide yearelie rente of fower poundes eight 
shillinges and fower pence or any parte or parcell thereof to be behind 
and unpaide by the space of eight and twenty dayes, next after anye of 
the feast daies aforesaide in which it ought to be paide the same beinge 
lawfullye demaunded, That then imediatlye, or at any tyme from thence- 
forth it shall and may be lawfull to and for the saide Earle his heires 
and assignes into the saide messuage and tofte or two Tenementes and 
all other the premisses before by theise presentes demised with all and 
singuler their appurtenaunces whollye to reenter and the same to have 
againe repossesse and enjoye as in his or their former ei'iate, and the 
said Thomas Sadler Anthonye Sadler and William Sadler and everie of 
them and theire and everye of theire assignes from thence utterlye to 
expell, putt out and remove anye thinge in theise present indentures to 
the contrarye thereof in anywise notwithstandinge And the saide 
Thomas Sadler, Anthonye Sadler and William Sadler, and everie of them 
for them and everie of them, theire and everie of theire executors ad- 
mynistrators and assignes doe covenaunte promise graunte and agree- 
to and with the said Earle his heires and assignes and to and 
with everie of them by theise presentes, That they the said Thomas 
Sadler, Anthonye Sadler and William Sadler and their and everie 
of their assignes shall from tyme to tyme and at all tymes 
duringe the saide terme at their own proper costes and chardges 
in and by all and all manner of needfull and necessary reparacions 
well and sufficiently upholde maintayne repaire amende, dense, 
skower, and kepe, or cause to be well and sufficientlye upholden, 
mayntayned, repaired, amended, clensed, skowred and kepte all and 
singuler the howses, edifices, buildings, hedges, diches, moundes, fences, 
and enclosures of within or upon the saide messuage and tofte or two 
tenementes and all other the premises before by theise presentes demised, 
and the same so well and suffiicentlye upholden, maynteyned, repaired, 
amended, clensed, skowred and kepte at or in thende or other determi- 
nacion of the said terme shall leave and yealde upp And the said© 
Earle for him his heires, executors administrators and assignes and 
everie of them covenauntethe and grauntethe to and with the said Thomas 
Sadler Anthony Sadler and William Sadler and to and with everie of 
them, theire and everie of theire Executors administrators and assignee 
by theise presentes, That he the saide Earle his heires and assignes and 
everie of them shall at all tymes and from tyme to tyme duringe the 
saide terme for and towardes the mayntenaunce of the saide Messuage 
and tofte or two tenementes and all other the premisses before by theise 



242 The Society's MSS. QvAdhampton. 

presentes demised upon reasanable request to be made to the saide Earle 
his heires, or assignes or to his or theire Surveyor woodward or other 
officer apoynted for that purpose, allowe and by them selves or some or 
one of their saide officers appoynte and sett fourthe to and for the said 
reparacions so from tyme to tyme to be done and made sufficiente rough 
tymber, now or hereafter standinge, growinge, or beinge in or upon the 
saide premisses before by theise presentes demysed, the fellinge squaringe, 
caryinge and settinge upp whereof to be at the proper costes and chardges 
of the saide Thomas Sadler, Anthony Sadler and William Sadler and of 
theire and everie of their assignes onelye And alsoe that they the 
said Thomas Sadler Anthonye Sadler and William Sadler and everie of 
them, and theire and everie of theire assignes, shall or may likewise from 
tyme to tyme when and as often as nede shall require duringe the said 
terme have perceave and take at seasonable tymes in the yeare competent 
and sufficient howse boote (excepte tymber to be allowed and taken onlye 
in manner and forme before mencioned and not otherwise) fyerboote 
plowghboote and hedgeboote standinge and growinge in and upon the 
said pemisses by these presentes demysed, the same to be spent and 
occupied in and upon the same onlye and not els where, and that without 
spoyle or waste makinge duringe the said terme And the said Thomas 
Sadler Anthonye Sadler and William Sadler for them and everie of 
them, their and everie of their executors administrators and assignes do 
further covenaunte promise graunte and agree to and with the saide 
Earle, his heires and assignes and to and with everie of them by theise 
presentes in manner and forme followinge, That is to saye, that they the 
said Thomas Sadler Anthony Sadler and William Sadler and theire and 
everie of theire assignes shall yearly duringe the saide terme at seasonable 
tymes in the yeare sett and plante in and upon the saide premisses before 
by theise presentes demysed, three trees likelye to growe wherof one to 
be a fruite tree, and the same so beinge sett and planted shall kepe and 
defende as much as they maye from spoyle and distruccion to thende 
they may growe prosper and contynewe And further shall .duringe all 
the saide terme dwell, inhabitt and be resyante in or uppon the said 
Messuage by theise presentes demised and there kepe howse and mayn- 
tayne hospitalitye in reasonable and convenient manner And shall 
likewise allowe and finde unto the officers of the saide Earle his heires 
and assignes comminge and resortinge to the saide Messuage and other 
the premisses before by theise presentes demysed to surveye the same or 
aboute other affayers of the saide Earle his heires and assignes con- 
cerninge the said premisses, meate, drinke, and lodginge competent and 
sufficiente for them and their retinewe, and stablinge, litter, haye, 
provender and grasse mete and sufficiente for theire horses, mares and 
geldinges ones everie yeare during the saide terme by the space of one 
daye and one night at each tyme onlye and not above And further 
that neather they the saide Thomas Sadler, Anthonye Sadler nor William 
Sadler nor anye of them, nor their or anie of their assignes nor any other 
person or persons, havinge or lawfully clayminge any estate or interest, 
of, or in the saide premisses by theise presentes demysed, or of, or in 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 243 

anye parte or parcell thereof, by from or under thern or anye of them, or 
in theire, or any of their righte, shall at anye tyme duringe the said 
terme breake upp, eare, sowe, or converte into tillage any parte of the 
meadowe or pasture grounde before by theise presentes demysed without 
the licence of the saide Earle his heires or assignes firste had and obteyned 
in writinge under his, or theire handes and seales (other then suche 
pasture grounde as at the tyme of suche convertinge shalbe knowen to be 
barrenn and olde laye grounde, unfitt for good pasture and suche as by 
course of good husbandrye wilbe the better afterwardes by beinge plowed. 
And that neither they the said Thomas Sadler Anthony Sadler nor 
William Sadler nor anye of them nor theire or anye of their assignes 
nor anye other persone or persons clayminge by from or under them or 
any of them, or in their or any of their right shalbe retajmed into the 
service of any person or persons at any tyme duringe the contynuance of 
the saide terme and of their interest therein without the speciall licence 
of the said Earle his heires or assignes first had and obteyned in writinge 
under his or their hande and seale, but shall at all tymes (beinge not 
then otherwise unmete and unable for such service in respecte of their 
age sexe sicknes, or other debilitie of bodye) be readye to serve and shall 
serve the Quenes Majestie her heires and successors under the conducte 
of the said Earle his heires and assignes when and as often as the 
said Earle his heires and assignes shall serve in the warres of her 
Majestie her heires and successors in his or their own proper person or 
persons if they or any of them shalbe thereunto required by the said 
Earle his heires or assignes Nor shall alyen assigne, or sett over all 
theire whole estate, or interest before by theise presentes demised of or 
in the before demysed premisses, or of, or in any parte or parcell thereof 
to anye person or persons, bodyes politique or corporate without the like 
licence of the said Earle his heires and assignes in writinge under his or 
theire handes and seales first had and obteyned for the same And 
the said Earle for him his heires, executors, administrators and assignes 
and everie of them covenaunteth, graunteth, and agreethe to and with 
the said Thomas Sadler, Anthony Sadler and William Sadler, and to and 
with everie of them, theire and everie of theire of their executors ad- 
mynistrators and assignes by theise presentes in manner and forme fol- 
lowinge, that is to saye That they the said Thomas Sadler, Anthony 
Sadler, and William Sadler and everie of them and theire, and everie of 
their assignes for the said yerely rent and under the covenauntes, con- 
dicions, grauntes, articles, clauses and agrementes before in and by theise 
presentes reserved and specified, which on the parte and behalfe of the 
saide Thomas Sadler, Anthony Sadler, and William Sadler, aind every of 
them, theire and everie or anie of theire assignes are to be observed 
fulfilled and kepte, shall or may peaceablie and quietlye duringe 
the said terme, have holde, use, occupie and enjoye all and singuler 
the premisses before by theise presentes demysed and everie parte 
and parcell thereof without the lett, trouble, eviction, or interruption 
of the said Earle his heires or assignes or any of them or of any other 
person or persons clayminge by from or under them or anye of them or 



244 The Society's 3ISS. Quidhampton. 

by their or any of their assent, consent, meanes, eommaundement or 
procurement And the said Earle dothe by their presentes constitute, 
ordeyne, and in his place put his welbeloved in Christe Adryan Frye of 
Lydyarde and John AVelles of Studlye in the countye of Wiltess' gentelmen 
his true and lawfull Attornyes, joyntlie and severallye for him and in 
his name unto the said premisses by theise presentes demised, or into 
some parte or pareell thereof in the name of the whole to enter, and 
possession, or seisen thereof, or of some parte or pareell thereof in the 
name of the whole to take, And after such possession or seisen thereof, 
or of anie part or pareell thereof in the name of the whole taken and 
had, Then full and peaceable possession or seisen thereof, or of some parte 
or pareell thereof in the name of the whole for him, and in his name to 
deliver unto the said Thomas Sadler, Anthonye Sadler, and "William 
Sadler, or unto anie of them in the name of them all accordinge to the 
true intente and meanynge of these presentes, Eatifyinge and confirrnynge 
all and everye thinge and thinges whatsoever his saide attornyes or either 
of them shall doe in the premisses by theise presentes. In witness 
whereof the partyes to theise presentes have interchaungeablye putt their 
handes and seales to the same : geven the daye and yeare firste above 
written. 

E. Hertford 

[Under the fold] Eic : Whkler. 

Seal indistinct, apparently, quarterly of six. 

Endorsed : Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of the persons 
whose names are heare underwritten 

Kic : Wheleb Eoger Wuleston Edward Tutt 

Also 

M d . that possession and season was by vertue of these presentes taken 
and hadd the xxvj th daye of Februarye in the thyrtith yere of the Quenes 
Majesties raign that nowe ys in the messuage within specified in the 
name of all the within graunted premisses by Adryan Frye and John 
Welles attorneyes within named and soe by them delivered to the 
within named Thomas Sadler Anthony Sadler and William Sadler 
accordinge to the tenour effect purporte and true meanynge of this 
present lease in the presence of John Seger Bichard Ecotte, 
John Wallington and Thomas Bartelett. 

Al*o Thomas Salder, apparently a signature. 

Also " No. 4." 

No. 103. 

On the death of Thomas Sadler his children, as it appears, de- 
cided to relinquish Costowe. The sale hy Anthony Sadler of 
" Quintens," which we have already recorded, was accompanied hy 
an assignment to the same William Benet of the lease under Lord 
Hertford. The original of this particularly interesting indenture 
is, unfortunately, not forthcoming: — 



The Society's 3ISS. Qttidhampton. 245 

(59) 

16th July, 39 Eliz a : 1597. By Indenture Between Anthony Sadler 
and W m . Sadler of the one part and W™. Bennett of the other part 
Beciteing the Lease of the First of Sept 29 Eliz a : from the Earl of 
Hertford, The said Anthony Sadler and W'\ Sadler takeing notice that 
they had survived the said Thomas Sadler their Father In consideracion 
of a certaine sum of money paid them by W m , Bennett Did demise grant 
assigne and Sett over unto the s d W m . Bennett and his Assignes All the 
same premisses demised by the s d . Earl of Hertford to Thomas Anthoney 
and W m . Sadler 

To hold to the said W m . Bennett and his assignes dureing the lives 
of the said W m . and Anthony Sadler and the survivor of them subject 
to the rent payable to the said Earl by the s a recited lease with a covenant 
for quiet enjoyment against them or the said Tho : Sadler their late 
father and against William Sadler and John Sadler uncle (sic) of the said 
Anthony and William Sadler And a covenant from W m . Bennett to in- 
demnify the Sadlers in respect of the Assignement. 

The next document extant, or recorded in the " abstract," is 
nearly eleven years later. In the interval, it would appear, William 
Benet had taken a fresh lease of the premises from the Earl of 
Hertford, for the lives of himself and Anne his wife, and it is upon 
the surrender of this lease that the Earl, by the indenture which 
follows grants in 1608, a new lease to Sir John Benet, for the lives 
of the said Anne and of William and Matthew, two of Sir John's 
•children : — 

(60) 

6 May, This Indenture made the seaventh day of May in the yeres 
1608. of the raigne of our most gracious soveraigne Lord James by 

the grace of God Kinge of England Fraunce and Ireland 
defender of the faythe &c. the sixth and of Scotland the one and fortyth 
Betweene the Bight Honorable Sir Edward Seymour Knight Baron 
Beauchampe and Earle of Hertford of the one parte And Sir John Benett 
of the Citty of London Knight of the other parte Witnesseth that the 
saide Earle as well for and in consideracion of a surrender in due forme 
of lawe nowe made unto him the said Earle by William Benett thelder 
of Weeke in the County of Wiltes gentleman and Anne his wyfe of all 
theire and eyther of theire estate right tytle interest and terme for the 
lyves of the saide William and Anne of and in the Messuage and Tofte 
or two tenementes and all other the landes and hereditamentes with 
theire appurtenaunces hereafter in and by theis presentes demysed or 
mencioned to be demysed As also for and in consideracion of the somme 
of nynescore poundes of lawfull money of England to him the saide 
Earle by the saide Sir John Benett (in name of a fyne or income) before 



246 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

thensealing and delivery of theis presentes well and trewlie paid where- 
of and wherewith the saide Earle acknowledged hitnselfe to be fully 
contented and satisfied and thereof and of every parte and parcell thereof 
doth clerelie acquite and discharge the saide Sir John Benett his executors 
and admynistrators and every of them by theis presentes Hath demysed 
betaken and to ferme letten and by theis presentes doth demyse be- 
take and to ferme lett unto the saide S r . John Benett All those his 
Messuage and Tofte heretofore demysed called or knowen by the name 
of two Tenementes scituate lyinge and being in Costowe in the foresaide 
county of Wiltes neere unto the saide Earle his Graunge called Studley 
graunge in the said county of Wiltes together with all orchardes gardens 
inward and outward courtes or yardes howses edifices buildinges barnes 
and stables and all other his arrable landes meadowes pastures feedinges 
and other hereditamentes to the saide messuage and tofte or two tene- 
mentes or to eyther of them belonging or in anie wise appertayning 
lying and being within the parish of Wroughton in the saide county of 
Wiltes late in the tenure manurance or occupacion of Thomas Sadler 
deceased Anthony Sadler and William Sadler or some of them theire or 
some of theire assigne or assignes and nowe or late in the tenure manu- 
rance or occupacion of the said William Benett thelder or of his assigne 
or assignes And also all those his three acres and an halfe of meadowe 
lying and being in a certeine meadow called the Hurst and all that other 
parcell of meadowe adjoyninge to the said Hurst meadowe and extend- 
ing to a certeine parcell of ground and streame called Holbrooke And all 
those six acres of land lying and being in the Eastfeilde in the lower 
parte of the saide field be yt more or lesse And all those six acres of 
arrable land lying and being in a certeine comon called the Westfeild 
uppon the hill there be yt more or less And all that close of pasture 
called the Berry meade or Berry close also lying and being within the 
saide parish of Wroughton and lykewyse late in the tenure manurance 
or occupacion of the saide Thomas Sadler deceased Anthony Sadler and 
William Sadler or some of them theire or some of theire assigne or 
assignes and nowe or late in the tenure manurance or occupacion of the 
saide William Benett thelder of his assignee or assignees Together with all 
comons and comons of pasture wayes easementes profittes and comodityes 
to the saide premyses belonging or in any wyse appertayning in as large 
ample and beneficiall manner and forme as the saide William Benett 
thelder or his assignes have at any tyme held occupied or enjoyed the 
same Except and alwaies reserved unto the saide Earle his heires and 
assignes all manner of mettalls mynes and quarrs and all woodes under- 
woodes tymber trees and other greate trees (saving fruite trees) nowe or 
hereafter standing growinge renewing or being in or uppon the saide 
premyses or any parte or parcell thereof And lykewise except and 
reserved unto the saide Earle his heires and assignes all and all manner 
or hawkes and herons from tyme to tyme breeding or keeping in or upon 
the said premyses by theis presentes demysed Together with free lyberty 
of fyshing fowling hawking and hunting at all manner of game to and 
for the saide Earle his heires and assignes and to and for his and theire 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 247 

servauntes and every other parson or parsons by his or theire speciall 
lycence and appointment in and uppon the saide prernyses and in and 
uppon every parte thereof To have and to holcle the saide Messuage 
and Tofte heretofore demysed and all other the premisses with all and 
singuler theire appurtenaunces (except before excepted) unto the saide 
Sir John Benett his executors admynistrators and assignes from the feast 
of Thannuneyacion of the blessed virgin Sainte Mary last past before the 
date of theise presentes unto the end and terme of fowerscore and nyne- 
teene yeres from thence next ensuing and fully to be compleate and 
ended yf the said Anne wyfe of the saide William Bennett thelder 
and William Bennett and Mathewe Bennett sonnes of the saide Sir 
John Bennett or any one of them the saide Anne William Benett the 
sonne and Mathewe Benett doe or shall soe long happen to lyve 
Yeldinge and payinge therefore yerelie during the said terme the 
olde and accustomed yerelie rente or somme of fower poundes eight 
shillinges and fower pence of lawfull English money at two feastes or 
termes in the yere most usuall that ys to say at the feastes of Sainte 
Michaell tharchaungell and Thannuneyacion of the blessed virgin Sainte 
Mary by even and equall poreions And the saide Sir John Benett for 
himselfe his heires executors administrators and assignes and for every 
of them doth covenaunte and graunte to and with the saide Earle his 
heires and assignes and to and with every of them by theis presentes 
that yf it shall happen the said yerelie rent of fower poundes eight 
shillinges and fower pence or anye parte thereof reserved as aforesaid to 
be behind and unpaied at any tyme during the saide terme by the space 
of one and twenty dayes nexte after any of the saide feast dayes at or in 
which it ought to be payed as is aforesaide the same having been 
lawfully demaunded at or within the said messuage before by theis 
presentes demysed That then the saide Sir John Bennett and his assignes 
and every other parson and parsons lawfully clayming or which shall 
clayme by from or under him or his right or under this present demyse shall 
f orfaite and pay unto the saide Earle his heires and assignes for everie such 
default of payment of the saide yerely rent in manner and forme before 
rnencioned the somme of twenty shillinges of lawfull money of England 
for and in the name of a paine over and above the saide yerelie rent of 
fower poundes eight shillinges and fower pence And that for every such 
somme or sommes of money soe to be forfaited for and in the name of a 
payne for everie or any such default as is aforesaide yt shall and may 
be lawfull to and for the saide Earle his heires and assignes and every or 
any of them into all and singuler the saide prernyses before by theis 
presentes demysed with all and singuler theire appurtenaunces to enter 
and distraine and the distresse and distresses there found and taken to 
leade chase dryve and carry away and the same to keepe holde and de- 
taine untill such tyme as he the saide Earle his heires or assignes and 
every or any of them of all and every such somme or sommes of money 
so to be forfaited for and in the name of a payne for every such defaulte 
of payment as is aforesaide be fully satisfied contented and paied 
Provided alwayes yf it shall happen the saide yerelie rent or summe 



248 The Society's MSS. Quidhcmpton. 

of fower pounds eight shillinges and fower pence or any parte or parcell 
thereof to be behind and unpaied duringe the saide terme by the space 
of thirty dayes nexte after eny of the feast dayes aforesaide in which yt 
ought to be paied the same having bene also lawfully demaunded and 
noe sufficient distresse in or uppon the prernysses can or may be found 
That then ymmediately or at any time from thence forth yt shall and 
may be lawfull to and for the saide Earle his heires and assignes into 
the saide Messuage and Tofte and all other the premyses before by 
theis presentes demysed with all and singuler theire appurtenaunces 
wholie to reenter and the same to have againe repossesse and enjoy as 
in his or their former estate and the saide Sir John Benett his executors 
admynistrators and assignes from thence utterly to expell put out and 
remove any thinge in theis presentes Indentures to the contrarie thereof 
in any wyse notwithstandinge And the said Sir John Benett for himself 
his heires executours administrators and assignes and for every of them 
doth covenaunte graunte promyse and agree to and with the saide Earle 
his heires and assignes and to and with every of them by theis presentes 
in manner and forme following that ys to say That he the saide Sir John 
Benett his farmours tenauntes and assignes or some of them shall and 
will from tyme to tyme and at all tymes during the saide terme at theire 
owne proper costes and charges in and by all and all manner of needfull 
and necessarie reparacions well and sufficientlie uphold maintaine 
repaire amend dense skower and keepe or cause to be well and 
sufficientlie upholden maintained repaired amended clensed skowered 
and kept all and singuler the howses edifices buildinges hedges ditches 
styles gates wayes watercourses moundes fences and inclosures of within 
or uppon the said Messuage and Tofte and all other the premyses before 
by theis presentes demysed and the same soe well and sumcientlj 7 up- 
holden maintained repaired amended clensed skowred and kepte at or in 
the end or other determynacion of the saide terme shall and will leave 
or yeld up And shall yerelie during the saide terme at seasonable 
tymes in the yere sett and plant in and uppon the saide premyses before 
by theis presentes demysed in places needfull and convenient in every 
yere three trees lykely to growe (whereof one to be a fruite tree) and the 
same being soe sett and planted shall keepe and defende as much as 
they may from spoyle and destruction to the end that they may growe 
prosper and contynue And further shall and will during all the saide 
terme dwell inhabite and be resiant in or uppon the saide Messuage by 
theis presentes demysed and there by him or themselves or by his or 
theire servaunntes or famely keep howse and maintaine hospitallity in 
reasonable and convenient manner And shall lykewyse allowe and 
fynde to the officers of the saide Earle his heires and assignes coming 
and resorting to the saide messuage and other the premyses before by 
theis presentes demysed to survey the same or for or about other affaires 
of the saide Earle his heires and assignes concerning the said premyses 
meate drincke and lodging competent and sufficient for them and their 
retynue and stabling lytter hay provender and grass meete and sufficient 
for their horses mares and geldings once every yere during the saide 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 249 

terme by the space of one day and one night at each tyme onelie and 
not above And farther that neither he the saide Sir John Benet his 
executors adinynistrators and assigns nor any of them nor any other 
parson or parsons having or lawfully clayrning or which shall have or 
lawfully clayrne anie estate or interest of or in the saide premises by theis 
presentes demysed or of or in any parte or parcell thereof by from or 
under him them or any of them or in his theire or any of theire right 
shall at any tyme during the saide terme breake upp eare sowe or con- 
vert into tillage any parte of the meadowe or pasture groundes before by 
theis presentes demysed without the speciall lycence of the said Earle 
his heires and assignes first had and obtained in writing under his or 
theire handes and seales such pasture ground as at the tyme of such con- 
verting shalbe knowen to be barren and old layne ground and unfitt for 
such pasture and such as by the course of good husbandry will be the 
better afterwardes by being plowed onely excepted If or shall alyen 
assigne or sett over all his or theire whole estate or interest before by these 
presentes demysed of or in the before demysed premyses or of or in anie 
parte or parcell thereof to any parson or parsons bodye politique or 
corporate (other then to the saide Anne William Benett the sonne and 
Mathewe Benett or to some or one of them or to the wyfe childe or 
children of the saide Sir John Benett without the lyke lycence of the 
saide Earle his heires or assignes in writing under his or theire handes 
and seales first had and obtained for the same And further that noe 
parson or parsons clayrning by from or under him the saide Sir John 
Benett or his assignes or any of them or in his theire or any of theire 
right or under this presente demyse shalbe retained into the service of 
any parson or parsons at any tyme during the contynuance of the saide 
terme and of theire interest therein without the speciall lycence of the 
saide Earle his heires and assignes first had and obtained in writing 
under his or theire handes and seales but shall at all tymes being not 
then otherwyse unmeete and unable for such service in respecte of sex age 
sicknes or other debillity of bodie be ready to serve and shall serve 
the kinges majestie that nowe .ys his heires and successors under the 
conducte of the saide Earle his heires and assignes when and as often as 
the saide Earle his heires and assignes shall serve in the warrs of his 
majesties his heirs and successors in his or theire owne proper parson or 
parsons yf they or any of them shalbe thereunto required by the saide 
Earle his heires or assignes And the Saide Earle for himselfe his heires 
executors admynistrators and assignes and everie of them covenaunteth 
and graunteth to and with the saide Sir John Benett his executors ad- 
mynistrators and assignes by theis presentes in manner and forme fol- 
lowing that is to say That he the saide Earle his heires and assignes and 
everie of them shall and will at all tymes and from tyme to tyme during 
the saide terme for and towardes the maintenaunce and reparacion of the 
saide messuage and tofte and all other the premyses before by theis 
presentes demysed uppon reasonable request to be made to the saide 
Earle his heires or assignes or to his or theire surveyour woodward or 
other officer for that purpose to be appointed allowe and by themselves 
/OL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. S 



250 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

or some or one of theire saide officers appointe and sett forth to and for 
the saide reperacions soe from tyme to tyme to be done and made 
sufficient rough tymber nowe or hereafter standing growing or being in 
or uppon the saide premyses before by theis presentes demysed the 
felling squaring carrying and setting upp whereof to be at the proper 
costes and charges of the saide Sir John Benett his executors admynis- 
trators or assignes onelie And also that he the saide Sir John Benett 
his executors admynistrators and assignes shall or may from tyme to 
tyme when and as often as neede shall require during the saide terme- 
have perceave and take at seasonable tymes in the yere competent and 
sufficient howse-boote (excepte tymber to be allowed and taken onelie in 
manner and forme before mencioned and not otherwyse) fireboote 
ploughboote and hedgeboote standing and growing in and uppon thfr 
saide premyses by theis presentes demysed the same severall bootes to 
be spent and occupied in and uppon the same premyses onely and not 
elsewhere and that without spoyle or wast making during the saide 
terme And further that the saide Sir John Benett his executors ad- 
mynistrators and assignes and every of them for the saide yerely rent 
and under the covenauntes condicions grauntes articles clauses and 
agreementes in and by theis presentes reserved and specified which on 
the parte and behalfe of the saide Sir John Benett his executors ad- 
mynistrators and assignes are to be observed fulfilled and kepte shall or 
may peaceably and quietlie during all the saide terme of fowerscore and 
nyneteene yeres (yf and in case the foresaide Anne and the saide 
• "William Benett the Sonne and Mathewe Benett or any of them shall 
so longe happen to lyve) have holde use occupie and enjoye all and 
singuler the premyses before by theis presentes demysed and every 
parte and parcell thereof without the lett trouble eviction or interruption of 
the said Earle his heires or assignes or any of them or of anie other person 
or persons lawfully clayming by from or under him them or anie of them 
or by his theire or any of theire acte assent consent meanes comaundement 
or procurement And lastly the saide Earle for himselfe his heires 
executors administrators and assignes and every of them covenaunteth 
and graunteth to and with the saide Sir John Benett and his assignes 
that he the saide Earle and his heires shall and will at all tymes hereafter 
within the space of two yeres next ensuing the date hereof upon 
reasonable request to be made to him or them by the saide Sir John 
Benet or his assignes or some or one of them make doe suffer and 
execute all and everie such further acte and thinge devyse and devises 
in the lawe for the better assuring and sure making of the premyses 
unto the saide Sir John Benet or his assignes as is aforesaide as by the 
counsell learned in the lawe of the saide Sir John Benet or his assignes 
shalbe reasonably devysed or required at the costes and charges of the 
said Sir John Benet and his assignes Soe that the saide Earle and his 
heires be not enforced for making doeing suffring or executing thereof to 
travell from his or theire place of abode at the time of such request made 
In witnes whereof the parties to theis presente Indentures have inter- 
chaungeably putt theire handes and seales Geven the day and yere first 
above written Anno Domini 1608. E. Heetfoed. 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 251 

In the fold. Exaininatur per Ja : Kyrton. 

Seal cut off. 

Endorsed. Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of 

Gilbert Peyne 
Kic : Whelee 
James Kyeton 
James Kyeton 
Josias Kyeton 
eobeet bankworth 
Tho : Sandfoed 



Also " No. 8. 



No. 114. 



Three days later Sir John assigned this lease over to his brother 
practically for life and five years over, at a peppercorn rent : — 

(61) 
10 May This Indenture made the tenth daie of Maie in the yeare 
1608. of the raigne of o r soveraigne Lord James by the grace [of 
God] of England Scotland France and Ireland Kinge Defendo' 
of the faith &c. vizt. of England France & Ireland the sixt & of Scotland 
thone & fortith Betweene S r John Benet of London Knight on thone 
parte and William Benet of Marlborough in the Countye of Wiltes Esq r 
on thother parte Wheareas the right honorable S r . Edward Seymour 
Knight Baron Beauchampe Earle of Hertford by an Indenture of lease 
made and bearinge date the seaventh daie of Maie in the saide yeare of 
o r said soveraigne Lord did demise betake and to ferme lett to the sayd 
S r John his executors administrators and assignes All those his 
Messuage and toft heretofore demised called or knowne by the name of 
two Tenementes situate lyinge & beinge in Costowe in the Countie of 
Wiltes aforesaid nere unto the said Earle his Grange called Stadley (sic) 
grange in the said Countie of Wiltes Together with all orchardes 
gardens inward or outward courtes or yardes houses edifices buildinges 
barnes and stables and all other his arable landes meadowes pastures 
feedinges and other hereditamentes to the said Messuage or Toft 
or two tenementes or to either of them belonginge or in any wise 
appertayninge lyinge & beinge within the parish of Wroughton in the 
said Countye of Wiltes late in the tenure manurance or occupacion of 
Thomas Sadler deceased Anthony Sadler & William Sadler or some of 
them theire or some of theire assignee or assignees & now or late in the 
tenure manurance or occupacion of the said William Benett or of his 
assignee or assignees And also all those his three acres and an halfe of 
meadowe lyinge & beinge in a certaine meadow called the Hurst and all 
that other parcell of meadow adjoyninge to the said Hurst meadow and 
extendinge to a parcell of ground & streame called Holbrooke and all 
those sixe acres of land lyinge & beinge in the east feild in the lower 
parte of the said feild be it more or lesse And all those sixe acres of arable 
land lyinge in a certaine common called the west feild uppon the hill 

S 2 



252 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

there be it more or lesse And all that close of pasture called the Berry 
mead or berry close, all lyinge & beinge within the said parish of 
Wroughton and likewise late in the tenure manurance or occupacion of 
the said Thomas Sadler deceassed Anthony Sadler & William Sadler or 
some of them theire or some of theire assignee or assignees and now or 
late in the tenure manurance or occupacion of the said William Benet 
or of his assignee or assignees Together with all Commons commodities 
common of pasture waies easmentes and profittes to the said premises 
belonginge or in any wise appertayninge in as large ample & beneficiall 
manner and forme as the said William Benet or his assignes have or at 
any tyme held occupyed or enjoyed the same (except as in the said 
Indenture is excepted) To have and hold all and singular the premises 
with theire and every of theire appurtenaunces (except as therein is 
excepted) to the said S r John Benet his executors administrators and 
assignes from the feast of the Annuntiacion of the blessed virgine S' 
Marye then last passed for the terme of fourescore and nyneteene yeares 
if Anne Benet wife of the said William Benet William Benett and 
Mathew Benet sonnes of the said S r John Benett or any of them shall 
so longe live for and under such rent exceptions covenauntes condicions 
articles and agreementes as in and by the sayd Indenture of lease 
whereunto reference be had are referred mencioned expressed and con- 
tayned Now therefore witnesse theis presentes that the said S r John 
Benet (for diverse good causes and consideracions him thereunto movinge) 
hath demised graunted and to ferme letten and by theis presentes 
doth demise graunt & to ferme lett to the saide William Benet 
(partie to these presentes) all and singular the said Messuage and 
toft and all and every other the premises before to him the said S r John 
demised and graunted as aforesaid with theire and every of theire 
appurtenaunces (except as in the said recited Indenture is excepted) 
To have and hold the said demised premises and all and every parte 
thereof with theire and every of theire appurtenaunces in as full and 
ample manner as the same are to him the said S r . John demised by the 
said Earle as aforesaid unto the said William Benet (partie to theis 
presentes) his executors administrators and assignes for and duringe and 
untill the full terme of three score yeares from the feast of the An- 
nuntiacion of the blessed Lady the virgine now last passed to be 
accompted and thenceforth next followinge fully to be complete expired 
and ended if the said Anne Bennet William Benet and Mathew Benet 
sonnes of the said S r John or any of them the said Anne William the 
sonne or Mathew shall so longe live Yeildinge and payinge therefore 
yearely duringe the saide terme to the said S r John his executors ad- 
ministrators and assignes at the feast of the nativitie of o r Lord God one 
peper corne And the said S r John Benet for him his executors and 
administrators doth covenaunt promise graunt and agree to and with 
the said William Benet partie to theise presentes his executors 
administrators and assignes by theis presentes in manner and forme 
followinge that is to saie That he the said William partie to theis pre- 
sentes his executors, administrators & assignes for & duringe all the 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 253 

terme hereby demised shall or lawfully maie (for by & under the rentes 
covenauntes condicions excepcions & reservacions in the said originall 
lease & in theis presentes mencioned & contayned) have hold & enjoye 
the said demised premises & every parte thereof with thappurtenaunces 
freed acquited & discharged or uppon reasonable request saved and kept 
harmelesse of and from all former bargaines sales leases grauntes 
assignmentes troubles charges and incumbrances whatsoever by him the 
said S r John at any tyme had made occasioned done or suffered And 
that he the sayd S r John his executors administrators and assignes or 
some of them shall and will from tyme to tyme & at all tymes hereafter 
duringe the terme hereby demised when and as often as neede shall 
require shew forth or cause to be shewed forth to him the said William 
partie to theis presentes his executors administrators & assignes or his 
or theire Councellours At£u[r]neys agentes or Sollicitours the said 
originall Indenture of demise from the said Earle, to him the said S r John 
made as aforesaid to be pleaded or given in evidence as occasion shall 
require for the necessary maintenaunce & defence of thestate title & 
interest of him the said William partie to theise presents his executors 
administrators & assignes of in & to the premises horeby demised or any 
parte thereof or of any accion or suite by them or theire undertenauntes 
to be commenced uppon for or touchinge the saide premises or the profittes 
thereof or any thinge thereunto pertayninge And the said William Benet, 
partie to theis presentes doth for him his executors administrators 
& assignes covenaunt graunt promise & agree to & with the said S r John 
Benet his executors administrators & assignes That he the said William 
Benet partie to theis presentes his executors administrators & assignes 
and every of them shall & will from tyme to tyme duringe the terme 
hereby demised paye the rent for the premises reserved, and observe 
performe fullfill & keepe all & every the grauntes excepcions articles 
covenauntes & agreementes in the said originall Indenture of lease 
mencioned & contained on the parte and behalfe of the said S r John his 
executors administrators & assignes to be payed observed performed 
fulfilled & kept And of & from all accions suites distresses entries 
forfeitures troubles & damages which shall or maie arise grow happen 
or be incurred for touchinge concerninge or by reason of the same or any 
of them or the non payment or not (sic) performance thereof or of any 
of them or any parte thereof duringe the saide terme hereby demised 
or graunted shall & will at all tymes acquite discharge & save 
harmlesse as well the said S r John his executors administrators & 
assignes & every of them as the said premises and thestate right & 
title of them the said S r John his executors administrators & assignes 
therein & thereunto and every parte thereof Provided all waies & 
uppon condicion that if it shall happen the said William partie to theis 
presentes to dye or departe this mortall life before thend of five and fifty 
yeares now next cominge of the terme hereby demised That then from & 
ymmediately after thend & expiracion of five yeares next ensuinge after 
the death & decease of him the said William (partie to theis presentes) 
this present demise lease & graunt of all and singular the premises shall 



254 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

cease & be utterly voyd determined & of none effect to all intentes & 
purposes and have no longer continuaunce or beinge any thinge in theis 
presentes before contayned or thereuppon to be construed to the contrary 
thereof in any wise notwithstandinge. In witnes whereof the parties 
above named have to theis present Indentures interchangeably sett theire 
handes and seales the daie & yeare first above written. 

(Signed) William Benett. 

Endorsed. Sealed & delivered in the presence of 

Jo : Speede. 

Also. 

Counterpart 10 May 6 Jacob: was for 60 yeares made by S r Jo: Benet 
to William Benet of Coslowe. 1608. No. (10). 

No. 115. 

William Benet was, in fact, settling his affairs, in anticipation 
of his decease, which at no very long interval happened. By in- 
denture, on the following day, he settles Cokharris alias Quintens, 
which he had purchased in 1597, on the issue of his brother Sir 
John. From the endorsement we gather the information, not 
otherwise forthcoming from this collection of documents, that the 
dispositions he made were after his death disputed by Balph Benet, 
elder brother of them both : — 

(62) 
11 May, This Indenture made the eleaventh daie of Maie in the 
A.D. 1608. yeare of the raigne of o r soueraigne Lord James by the grace 
of god of England ffrance and Ireland Kinge defendo' of the 
fayth &c. the sixt and of Scotland thone & fortith Betweene William 
Benec of Marleborough in the Countye of Wiltes Esq/ on thone parte 
and S r John Bennet of London Knight brother of the said William on 
thother parte Witnesseth that the said William for the setlinge of his 
lande tenementes and hereditanientes hereafter in and by theis 
presentes mencioned in to and upon himselfe and the heires of his owne 
bodye and for default of such issue in to and uppon others of his name 
and bloued as hereafter in and by theis presentes shalbe named and in 
consideracion of the entire loue and naturall affeccion w ch he the sayd 
William beareth to the heires of his owne body begotten or to be begotten 
and for theire advancement if god shalbe pleased to blesse him w ,k 
any such issue And in default thereof for his like loue and affeccion 
unto and towardes the persons hereafter in theis presentes named & for 
theire seuerall advancementes doth for him his heires and assignee 
hereby covenant graunt and agree to and w lh the said S r John Benet his 
heires and assignes in manner and forme followinge, that is to saie, That 
he the said William Benet and his heires shall and will from henceforth 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 255 

stand and be seised of and in all that and those his Tenement and Toft 
lyinge and beinge in Costowe in the parish of Wroughton in the County 
of Wiltes aforesaid And of and in all landes tenementes meadowes 
pastures closes woodes underwoodes commons profittes commodities 
advantages & hereditamentes whatsoeuer to the said Tenement & Tofte 
or to either of them belonginge or appertaininge and w ch he the said 
William lately purchased of Anthony Sadler of Costoe aforesaid to the 
uses intentes and purposes hereafter in theis presentes lymited and de- 
clared That is to saye First to thonely use and behoof of himselfe the 
said William and of the heires of his bodie lawfully begotten and to be be- 
gotten And for want of such issue then to the use and behoof of the executors 
administrators and assignes of him the said William for & duringe the 
terme of fiue yeares next after his decease and untill such of the feastes 
■of S l Michaell tharchangell or Thanmuntiacion of o' blessed Lady the 
Virgine S l Marye as shall next follow thend of the said fiue yeares And 
from and after the expiracion of the said fiue yeares and the cominge of 
such feaste then to the use and behoof of William Benet one of the 
sonnes of the sayd S r John Benet and of the heires males of his body 
lawfully to be begotten And for want of such issue then to the use & 
behoof of the heires females of his bodye lawfully begotten. & to be 
begotten And for want of such issue then to the use & behoof of Thomas 
Benet one other of the sonnes of the Said S r John Benet and of the 
heires males of his bodye lawfully to be begotten and for want of such 
issue then to the use and behoof of Mathew Benet one other of the sonnes 
of the sayd S r John Benet and of the heires males of his bodye lawfully 
to be begotten And for want of such issue then to the use and behoof 
of John Benet eldest sonne of the said S r John Bsnet and of the heires 
males of his bodye lawfully begotten & to be begotten And for want of 
such issue then to the use & behoof of the said S r John Benet and of the 
heires males of his body lawfully begotten & to be begotten And for 
want of such issue then to the use and behoof of the right heires of the 
said William Benet partie to theis presentes for ever Provided alwaies 
that it shall and maie be lawfull to and for him the said William Benet 
partie to theis presentes at any tyme or tymes hereafter and from tyme 
to tyme duringe his naturall life at his free will and pleasure by any his 
deede or writinge by him sealed and published in the presence of two 
credible witnesses or more to alter change abridge determine revoke or 
make voyd all or any the use or uses estate or estates in and by theis 
presentes before declared mencioned lymited or appointed to himselfe 
or to any one or more of other the sayd parties before mencio.ned or to 
all of them as for and touchinge all and euery the sayd premises or any 
parte or partes thereof And that at all tymes from and after such tyme 
as the said William partie to theis presentes shall by any such deede or 
writinge so revoke alter change abridge determine or make voyd or 
declare his mynd will and intent to be to alter change abridge detetermine 
revoke or make voyd any such vse or vses estate or estates That then 
and thenceforth such and soe many of the vses and estates herein before 
declared as shalbe declared to be altered changed determined revoked 



256 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

and made voyd shall accordingly stand and be altered changed revoked 
and made voyd for such so much and such part and partes onely of the 
premises as he shall declare his will and mind so to be and accordinge 
to the very true intent purporte & meaninge of such deede or writinge 
and of the said William therein and thereby expressed and declared 
In witnes whereof the parties above named have to theis present 
Indentures enterchangeably sett theire handes & scales the daie & yeare 
first aboue written. William Benett. 

Endorsed. Sealed and deliuered in the presence of 
Tho : We N TWO B THE 
Jo : Speeds 

This Indenture was shewed forth vnto Thomas Wentworth Esquier 
and to John Speed at the tyme of their examinacions on the parte and 
behalfe of S r John Bennett Knight plaintiff against Baphe Bennett 
Esquier and others defendauntes The xv lh daie of June 1610 

Per Nicholaum Boberts in Cancellaria Examinatorem. 

Endorsed. William Benet of Marlebourgh did covenant w ,h Sr Jo : 
Benet to stand seised of Costow to y e vse of himself for life & after to 
y" vse of William Benet of Grayes Inne entayle ll lh May 6 Jacob : w' h 
power of revocation. 

(ID 

No. 116. 

Eather more than a month later, by a document very remarkable 
for the vigour of its drafting no less than for the complicated 
arrangement to which the two brothers had come set out in it, 
the future devolution of lord Hertford's lease of the " Two Tene- 
ments " in Costowe was finally determined. Sir John, like many 
f his kindred, was a notable man. A certain distrust of him on 
William's part may, perhaps, be read into the final covenant : — 

(63) 
16 June, This Indenture made the sixteenth daie of June in the 
1608. yeare of the raigne of our soveraigne lord James by the grace 
of God of England France and Ireland kinge defendour of the 
faith &c. the sixt and of Scotland thone and fortith Betweene S r John 
Benett of the Cittye of London Knight of thone parte and William Benett 
the elder of Marleborough in the countie of Wiltes Esquier Brother of 
the sayd S r John Benett on thother parte Whereas the right Honorable 
S r Edward Seymour Knight Baron Beauchatnpe Earle of Hertford by 
an Indenture of lease under his hand and seale bearing date the seaventh 
daie of Maie last past before the date of theis presentes for the con- 
sideracions therein specified did demise betake and to ferme lett to the 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 257 

sayd S r John Benett his executors administrators and assignes All those 
his Messuage and toft heretofore demised called or knowne by the name 
of two Tenementes situate lyinge and beinge in Costowe in the countye 
of Wiltess' nere unto the sayd Earle his Grange called Studley 
Grange in the sayd countie of Wiltess' Together with all orchardes 
[&c. See No. 60 above] which sayd lease was had and obtained of the 
sayd Earle aswell upon and in consideracion of the surrender made to 
the sayd Earle by the sayd William Benet th'elder and Anne his 
wife of a lease for terme of theire lives which they had of the premises 
from the sayd Earle as alsoe in consideracion of a summe of money 
payed unto the sayd Earle for a fine for the sayd new lease by the sayd 
Sr John Benett And where nevertheles the true intent meaninge 
and agreement of the sayd S r John Benet and William Benet thelder 
was and is that he the sayd William Benet should hold and take the 
rentes issues and profittes of the premises to his owne use duringe so 
many yeares of the sayd terme as he the sayd William should live And 
that also the rentes revenues issues and profittes of the premises untill 
thend of one whole daie after such of the feastes of S' Michaell Thareh- 
angell or the Annunciacion of the blessed virgine S' Marye as should next 
ensue the end of five yeares next after the death and decease of the sayd 
William Benet thelder should be to him the sayd William his executors 
administrators or assignes And that afterwardes the sayd S r John Benet 
his executors administrators and assignes should stand possessed of the 
premises duringe the residue of the sayde terme And should hold the 
same upon the trustes and confidences and to the uses and behoofes of 
the child or children of the bodye of the sayd William Benet thelder 
lawfully issuinge as is hereafter in theis presentes expressed (if he shall 
have any issue) The said S r John Benet his executors or assignes having 
first levyed of the profittes of the premises the surne of two hundred 
poundes of lawfull money of England in recompence of the fine payed 
by him the sayd S r John to the sayd Erie (sic) for the lease first above 
mencioned And for want of issue of the bodye of the sayd William 
Benet and after the sayd five years expired then to stand possessed 
thereof and to hold the same to the use and benefitt of such of the sonnes 
of the sayd S r John Benet and of theire issues as is herein after lymited 
and declared as of the free guift to them thereof by the saydWilliam Benet 
their uncle proceedinge from his naturall love and affeccion unto them 
according to the purport limitacions and true intent of theis presentes 
And where alsoe to thend that the sayd William Benet and his assignes 
male better enjoye and take the profittes of the premises duringe certaine 
yeares of the saide terme (if he live so longe) and for five yeares after 
his decease according to thintent and agreement aforesayd the sayd 
S r John Benet by an Indenture of lease under his hand and seale bearinge 
date the tenth daie of Maie now last past, hath demised and graunted to 
the said William Benet thelder and his assignes all and singular the 
premises (except as in the said originall Indenture of lease is excepted) 
to hold for the terme of threescore yeares (if the sayd Anne Benet wife 
of the sayd William Benet thelder and the sayd William Benet 



258 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

and Mathew Benet sonnes of the sayd S r John or any of them 
should so long live) And uppon condicion that if the sayd William 
Benet thelder should dye before thend of fiftie and five yeares 
that then from and after thexpiracion of five yeares next after 
his decease the sayd lease and graunt to hime made should be voyd as 
thereby appeareth Howbeit the true meaninge is that if the sayd 
William Benet happen to dye that then his executors and assignes shall 
hold the premises for five yeares to begine and to be accompted from 
such feast daie of the feastes of S'. Michaell or thannuntiacion of the 
blessed virgine S l Marye as shall next ensue after the decease of the said 
William Benet thelder (if he dye without issue) Now (aswell in regard 
thereof as for the better assurance for due performance and accomplish- 
ment of the trusts and confidences above declared and mencioned) Theis 
presentes doe witnesse That it is fully covenaunted concluded declared 
condiscended and agreed by and betweene the sayd parties to theis 
presentes That he the sayd S r John Benet his executors and assignes 
shall stand and be possessed of the revercion of the said terme and of all 
and singular the premises for and during all the rest and residue of the 
said terme uppon the trusts and confidences and to the uses and intentes 
hereafter in theise presentes expressed and according to the true intent 
of theis presentes That is to saye Uppon trust and confidence and to the 
use and intent That if and in case the said William Benet thelder shall 
have any issue livinge at thend and determinacion of the said five yeares 
after his deceas that then the said S r John Benet his executors and 
assignes shall stand possessed of and in the premises for the terme residue 
First to the use of himself the sayd S r John his executors and assignes 
untill the summe of two hundred poundes shalbe or maie be for or to 
the use of him his executors or administrators levyed in recompence of 
the fine by him payed for obtayninge of the said lease And after the 
sayd summe levied then to the use of theldest sonne of the said William 
Benet thelder or in case he have no sonne and shall have one or more 
daughters then to the use of the said daughter or daughters And uppon 
trust and confidence alsoe in such case that after the said five yeares 
expired and after the said S r John his executors or assignes shall or maie 
have levied the said summe of two hundred poundes as aforesaid the 
said S r John his executors or assignes shall uppon the request of such 
sonn and if the said William have no sonne then of such his daughter or 
daughters (if he have any) assign over to such sonne of the said William 
Benet thelder (if such sonne be livinge after the said five yeares end) 
and if he have no sonne then livinge then to such daughter or daughters 
of the said William Benet th'elder (if any be then livinge) the said re- 
vercion and all the remainder of the said terme And uppon further 
trust and confidence alsoe That if it happen the said William Benet 
thelder to dye without any issue or having issue at his decease the said 
issue shall dye before thexpiracion of the said five yeares Then the said 
S r John Benet his executors and assignes shall stand and be possessed 
of the premises first to the use and behoof of thexecutors administrators 
and assignes of the said William Benet thelder untill thend of one daie 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 259 

next after such feast daie of the foresaid feastes of S' Michaell tharch- 
angell and thannunciacion of the blessed virgin S' Marye as shall next 
ensue after thexpiration of the said five yeares next after the deceas of 
the said William thelder And from thenceforth to the use and behoof 
of William Benet sonne of the said S r John and of the heires males of 
his body lawfully begotten and to be begotten and for want of such issue 
then to the use and behoof of the heires females of his body lawfully 
begotten and to be begotten And for want of such issue then to the use 
and behoof of Thomas Benet one other of the sonnes of the said S r John 
and of the heires males of his bodye lawfully begotten and to be begotten 
And for want of such issue then to the use and behoof of Mathew Benet 
one other of the sonnes of the said S r John and of the heires males 
of his body lawfully begotten and to be begotten And for want of such 
issue ithen to the use and behoof of John Benet eldest sonne of the said 
S r John and of the heires males of his bodye lawfully begotten and to be 
begotten And for default of such issue then to the use and behoof of the 
said S r John Benet and of the heires males of his bodye lawfully begotten 
and to be begotten And for want of such issue then to the use and 
behoof of the right heires of the sayd William Benet thelder for ever 
And with to and uppon this further use and intent That if and when as 
the said William (sonne of the said S r John) shalbe maryed and have 
taken a wife with and by the likinge of his sayd father (if he be then 
livinge) that then the said S r John his executors and assignes shall and 
maie (uppon the request of him the said William last named) make a 
lease of the premises or any parte thereof for any number of yeares 
determinable uppon the death of such wife and to her use and for her 
jointure And that from and after such tyme as he the said William shall 
have any child of thage of eight yeares That then the said S r John his 
executors administrators and assignes shall at the request of the said 
William sonne of the said S r John assigne to him the whole terme residue 
or otherwise surrender or dispose of the same at the will and pleasure of 
the said William last named And uppon further trust and confidence 
also that he the said S r John his executors and assignes shall permitte 
and suffer the severall persons aforenamed respectively to occupie and 
take the profittes of the premises duringe the severall termes and estates 
to every of them severally and respectively herein above lymited and 
and meant Provided allwaies the true intent meaninge and agreement 
of the said parties to theis presentes (notwithstandinge any thinge above 
mencioned) is That if and in case the sayd William Benet thelder shall 
happen to dye without issue and that in the meane tyme or afterwardes 
any one or more of them the said Anne Benet William Benet the yonger 
and Mathew Benett shall happen to dye in the life tyme of the said S r John 
or afterwardes that then and in such case after the decease of the sayd 
William and after th'end of the sayd terme to him his executors ad- 
ministrators and assignes intended as aforesaid, the said S r John his 
executors or assignes shallfand maie at his or their libertye and pleasure 
surrender the residue of the sayd terme and lease abovsaid at or uppon 
the takinge of a newe lease of the premises for more yeares determinable 



260 The Society's MSB. Quidhamjpton. 

uppon such of the life or lives of the sayd Anne, William the yonger 
and Mathew Benet which shalbe then livinge and uppon any other life 
or lives whom the said S r John shall then nominate or thinke fitte In 
which case the true intent meaninge and agreement of the said parties to 
theis presentes is That (uppon the obtaininge of any such new lease) the 
said S r John his executors and assignes shall first alsoe receave and levye 
(of the profittes of the premises) such summe or summes of money and 
charges as he or they shall paie or disburse for or about the obtaininge 
of such new lease. And from thence and afterwardes the rentes issues 
and profittes of the premises shalbe held taken receaved and injoyed 
during all the terme yeares and tyme residue of such new lease and estate 
And the said S r John his executors administrators and assignes of all 
and singular the premises duringe all such terme and tyme shall stand 
and be possessed for and to such and the like trusts confidences uses and 
intentes and for the behoofes of every such person and persons respectively 
as the sayd first recited lease should or ought to have bene held and 
possessed by and accordinge to the limitacion and true intent of theis 
presentes And the said S r John Benet for himselfe his executors and 
administrators covenaunteth and graunteth to and with the sayd 
William Benett thelder (brother of the sayd S John) by theis presentes 
That he the said S r John his executors and assignes (for his and theire 
partes respectively) shall and will truely performe all and every the 
trusts and confidences in him reposed in all thinges as is abovesaid and 
particularly and most especially the assigninge over of the revercion and 
residue of all the leas and terme above said to thissue, child or children 
of the said William Benet thelder which shalbe livinge at the ende of 
five yeares next after his decease as is abovesaid (if any then be) according 
to the true intent and meaninge of theis presentes In Witnes whereof 
the parties above named to theis present Indentures enterchangeably 
sett theire handes and seales the daie and yeare first above written. 

Jo : Benet 



M d that theise words (end of five years next after the) were enterlyned 
(betwene the eight and twentith and nyne and twentith lynes) before 
thensealinge and deliverye hereof 

Tho. Wentworthe 

Hie : Warner 

Tho : Sanford 

Sealed and delivered in the presence of 
Tho : Wentworthe 
Hie : Warner. 
Tho : Sanford 

Also "No. 15" and "(12)." 

Seal, cut off. 

No. 117, 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 261 

A fine had in the meantime been levied of the premises from 
which we learn the approximate acreage, not otherwise stated : — 

(64) 

May, 1608. Quinque septiman' Pasche 6 Ja: 11608. Chyrograph 
of fine Between Edward Earl of Hertford, plaintiff And "William Bennett, 
gent' and Anne his wife, deforciants 

Of two messuages one garden one orchard 60 acres of land 30 
acres of meadow and 80 acres of pasture cumpertinenciis in Wrough- 
ton and Costow. 

William Benet died, it would seem, 19 Feb., 1608-9. His will, 
presumably that proved, is not recorded on the " abstract," but a 
copy of it which occurs among these papers, is as follows : — 

(65) 
29 Dec. In the name of god Amen : the Nyne and twentieth day 
1608. of December, 1608, and in the yeares of the raigne of our 

soveraigne lord James, by the grace of god Kinge of England, 
Scotland, ffrance, and Ireland, defender of the faith etc. that is to saye, 
of England ffrance and Ireland the sixt, and of Scotland, the two and 
fortieth, etc. I William Benet of Marleborowe in the Countie of 
Wiltes gent, being weake in bodye, but of good and perfect mynde, and 
memorye (god I thanke him therefore) doe make and ordeyne this my 
present last will and testament in manner and forme followeing ; that is 
to saie, ffirst I bequeath my sowle unto Almightye god my maker sauiour 
and redeemer faithfullie and stedfastlye beleiving, through the merrittis, 
and bloudsheadinge of Jesus Christ to be saued, and enioye everlasting 
life. And as towcheing the disposicion of such landes, goodes, and 
chattells, as it hath pleased the lord to bestowe upon mee I geue and 
bequeath the same in manner and forme followeing (that is to saye) . 
ffirst I geue and bequeath to my welbeloved wife Anne Benet all her 
wearing apparell, one chaine of golde, and all suche ringes, jewelles, and 
other ornamentes, w ch shee now hath, or att anie tyme vseth to wear. 
Item I geue and bequeath to my saide wife, all my plate, and howse- 
holde stuffe, as bedsteades, beddinge, tables, chaires, stooles, and all other 
Implem tes of howseholde whatsoever, as are to mee belonging, and of all 
those thinges afore mencyoned, and for none other purpose onelye, I 
make my saide wife my executrix. Item my will, and mynde, is, that 
my saide wife Anne Benet shall w tb in the tyme and space of three 
monethes next after my decease, geve sufficient bond to my executor, to 
paye to Elizabeth Damport, daughter of John Damport, gent, eyther att 
the daye of marriage of the saide Elizabeth, or att her full age of twentye 
and one yeares, (w ch of them as shall first happen) the somme of one 
hundreth markes of lawfull money of England, And for the better 
advancement of the said Elizabeth, my will, and mynde, is, that my 



262 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

saide wife shall w th the proffites thereof mainteyne, and bring upp the 
saide Elizabethe, untill such tyme as shee shall accomplish the full age 
of twentye and one years, or her daye of marriage, And further, my will, 
and mynde, is, that my executor hereafter named, doe alsoe for the 
better educacion, and maintenance of the saide Elizabeth, and towardes 
her bringing upp, allowe and paye unto my saide wife, the somme of 
sixe poundes thirteene shillinges, and fower pence, of lawfull money of 
England yearelye, vntil shee happen to marrye, or come to her full age 
of twentye and one yeares, But if the parents of the saide Elizabeth bee 
not contented to haue her brought upp w"' my saide wife, but shalbe 
desirous to have her awaye from her, Then my will, and mynde, is, that 
my saide wife shalbe clearely acquited, and discharged of, and for the 
payment of the saide somme of one hundredth markes, and that shee 
never bee sued or troubled upon the saide bonde. Item my will and 
mynde is, that my executor hereafter named shall forthwithe paye all 
such debts & sommes of money, as I doe now owe unto my Cosin 
Margarett Harris amounting to the somme of threescore powndes, w ch is 
rentes, and moneys I haue receaved of her, w eh by my accompt kept by 
my self, for my owne remembraunce, as well as I could, is the utter- 
most pennye I do owe her, And if shee holde her self therew' th contented, 
then my will, and mynd, is that my executor hereafter named shall paie 
her for a legacye, the somme of twentye poundes more, of lawful money 
of England, w th in the tyme and space of two yeares next after my 
decease, But if shee doe not hold herself satisfied w th the saide somme of 
threescore powndes, then my will, and mynde, is, that shee shall neyther 
take, nor receaue anie benefitt, or proffitt of the legacye of twentye 
powndes bequeathed unto her, as aforesaide. Item I geue, and 
bequeath to my brother Edmond Benet the somme of five hundreth 
powndes of lawfull money of England, to bee paide w ,h in two yeares 
next after my decease, that is to say two hundred and fif tie powndes 
w th in the first yeare after my decease, and the other two hundreth and 
ffiftie powndes w l, 'in the second year next after my decease. Item I 
geue and bequeath to my brother Walter Benet the somme of two hun- 
dreth powndes of lawfull money of England to bee paide him in three 
yeares next after my decease, that is to say, one hundreth markes thereof 
the first yeare after my decease, another hundred markes thereof the 
second yeare after my decease, and the other hundred markes the third 
year after my decease. Item I doe owe to my said brother Walter 
Benet about the somme of fortye powndes, w ch somme of fortie powndes 
my will and desire is, that it bee paid assoone as soe much of my goodes 
shall come to the handes of my executor hereafter named. Item in 
token of my naturall loue to my three naturall sisters, I geue and be- 
queath severallye to their children, as followetb, vizt ; To John Vawer 
to buy him bookes twentye markes of lawfull money of England to bee 
paid the first yeare next after my decease, sixe powndes, thirteen shil- 
linges, and fower pence of like money and the second yeare after my 
decease other six powndes, thirteene shillings, and fower pence of like 
money. Item to my sister Pearse her eldest childe twentye markes of 






The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 263 

lawfull money of England, sixe powndes, thirteene shillinges and fower 
pence thereof to bee payed in the second year after my decease, and the 
other six powndes, thirteene shillinges, and fower pence to bee payde 
in the third yeare after my decease. Item I geue and bequeathe to 
William Breckenden my godsonne, sonne of my sister Breckenden, 
fortye powndes of lawfull money of England, to bee paide unto him in 
the first year next after nay decease. Item I geue and bequeathe to 
Biehard Benet sonne of my brother Baphe Benet the somme of two 
hundred powndes of lawfull money of England, whereof, my will, and 
mynde, is, that one hundred powndes thereof shalbe paide him in the 
third yeare after my decease, and the other hundred powndes to bee 
paid him in the fowerth yeare next after my decease. Item I geue and 
bequeath to my Uncle Thomas Tesdale of Glympton, the Inheritance of 
my land at Blunsden, in the countye of Wiltes, in w ch Acreman dwelleth, 
to this end and purpose that he shall w th in the space of one whole yeare 
next after my decease well and sufficientlye convey and assure the same, 
to the releif and benefitt of sixe of the poorest children borne in Abindon, 
and to be brought upp in that schoole, by the space of sixe yeares to be 
elected nominated by him whilest he liveth and and then in theire places 
others to bee elected of like povertye, to bee releived by this meanes, 
and those to bee nominated by the maior part of the Hospitall there 
being. But for the particularities thereof, how, and by what meanes it 
shalbe bestowed, I referr it to his christian care, and conscience, having 
manye tymes had speech my self w th him about this matter, and there- 
fore doth knowe my purpose herein. The Inheritance of my howse 
at Marlburgh, w* William Yorke, and his wife holde for tearme of their 
lives of mee. Item I geue and bequeath the same to the Mayor and 
Burgesses there, to thend that the rent of the saide howse may be bestowed 
yearely upon such of the poore of the saide towne, as they shall thinke 
fitt yearelye upon Easter daye during the lives of the saide William 
Yorke, and his nowe wife, and afterwardes that the saide Mayor, and 
Burgesses shall let out the same for the best proffitt, and twice in the 
yeare bestowe the same upon the poorest in the saide towne for their 
better releife and maintenaunce, That is to saye, upon Easter daye, and 
Christmas daye by equall porcions. Item I geue, and bequeath to my 
Uncle Tesdale in token of my love to him, my graye nagg and baye 
gelding, desiring him to accept them in good part. Item I geue and 
bequeath to everye howseholde seruant I now keepe five powndes a 
peiee to bee paid by my executor hereafter named w ,h in the the tyme 
and space of one yeare and a half next after my decease, Item I geue 
and bequeath to William Wyatt his wife five powndes of lawfull money 
of England. Item I geue and bequeath to John Gortons wife five 
powndes of lawfull money of England to be paide within one yeare and 
a half next after my decease. Item I geue and bequeath to George 
Pattricke five powndes of lawfull money of England all of them to bee 
payed within one yeare and a half next after my decease. Item I geue 
and bequeath to my brother Thomas Benet my biggest white siluer 
bowle desiring him to accept it in good part. The residewe of all my 



264 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

goodes, chattels, and leases whatsoeuer, not heretofore geuen, or be- 
queathed, I doe fullye, freelye, and absolutelye bestowe, and geue to, 
and upon my brother Raphe Benet, whom I doe hereby nominate and 
appoint my full and sole executor (except before excepted) of this my 
last will, and testament, desiring and entreating him, as he will answeare 
before god, or thinke to haue any good of any part, or portion of my 
goodes, to see my funerall decentlye, and comelye discharged according 
to my state and calling, and this my present last will and testament 
fullye performed, according to the trew intent and meaning of theis 
presentes. In wittnes whereof, to this my present last will and 
testament, I the said William Benet haue hereunto sett my hande and 
seale. Yeoven the daye, and yeare first aboue written 

William Benet 

Theis being witnesses John Whitfield, seruant to Rowland Squyer, 
scrivener, dwelling in pater noster Rowe, London, the marke of Thomas 
Scorye, seruant to Mr. William Benet, Nicholas Batcheler, Junior, 
seruant to Mr Tesdale Stampe, Salter. 

Whereas I the w th in named William Benet by my last will and testa- 
ment w th in written, have geven and bequeathed, or intended to geue and 
bequeathe the Inheritance of my howse at Marlburgh to the Mayor and 
Burgesses there, to such uses, as are w th in limitted wherein the name of 
the Corporation of the Burroughe of Marlburgh, is supposed to bee by 
mee mistaken, ffor reformacion thereof, I doe hereby declare that my 
will and meaning was, and nowe is, and I doe herebye geue, will, devise 
and bequeath unto the Mayor, and Burgesses of the Burroughe and 
towne of Marlburgh, in the Countie of Wiltes, and to their successors 
for ever, my said howse in Marlburgh, vizt., the Messuage, backside, and 
close there, now in the tenure of William Yorke, and Anne his wife, to such 
use, and uses, as in this my will w"'in written is limitted and expressed. 
And I will that this present Codicill shalbe annexed to my saide will, 
and shalbe accompted and adjudged parcell of the same.' In wittnes 
whereof I haue hereunto subscribed my name the fourth daye of 
ffebruarye, Anno Domini. 1608. In the presence of Thomas Hinton, 
John Hitchcock, and Thomas Solatter. 

William Benet. 

indorsed Testamentum Willielmi Benet de Marleborough (7). 

No. 118. 

Out of its proper place in the "abstract," that is to say, at the 
very end of the documents in this section, occurs the following: — 

(66) 
An Estimate of the value of all the Lordshipps Mannors lands 
tenements and other hereditaments late of William Benett deceased 
And which after his death descended to his brother Ralph Benett who 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 265 

at the death of the said William was forty years of age As by an 
Inquisicion taken the 8th of April 7'°°. Regis [1609] appears. And the 
said Ralph Benett 20 Feb r y 6°. Regis Jacobi [1608-9] came before the 
Master of the Court of Wards and Liverys and desired his Generall 
Livery from the s d King of all his Lordshipps lands and tenements under- 
written which was granted to him on condiccion that he prosecuted the 
same in 6 months within which time he came &c. 



The Scite or Mansion house of the Mannor of Sevington alias Sen- 
nington alias Sevenhampton in com' Wilts' cum pertinenciis held of the 
King in capite by a Knights Fee 

All the Gounds called Queens lands cont' 140 acres in Sennington 
predicta and all arable lands belonging to the Mansion house as parcell 
of the Demesnes of the s d Mannor cont' 420 acres of land 88 acres of 
meadow belonging to the s d . Mansion house And all woods underwoods 
common of pasture and sheep pasture called Billingtham in Sennington 
predicta held of the King as aforesaid att 6' 1 . 8 s . 4 d . 

William Bennett being seized of the premisses in his demesne as of 
fee by Indenture of the 9th April 6°. Regis Ja : 1 [1608] agreed with Giles 
Dan vers to stand seized thereof To the use of Anne his wife for life Re- 
mainder to himselfe and the heirs of his body Remainder to the use of 
William Bennett son of his brother Sir John Benett and the heirs 
males of his body with divers other remainders in fee tale Remainder 
to the right heirs in fee of the said AVilliam son of the said Sir John 
Benett for ever. 



All that tenement and toft lyeing in Costow in the parish of Wroughton 
in com' Wilts' and all lands tenements and hereditaments to the said 
tenement and tofc belongeing at 0" : 10 s . a . 

Settled by another indenture of the said William Bennett's dated 11 May 
6 Ja : [1608] To the use of the said William and the heirs of his body 
Remainder to the use of his executors administrators and assignes for 
five years after his decease And after to the use of the said William Bennett 
son of S r ' John Bennett and the heires males of his body with other 
remainders in fee tail Remainder to the right heirs of the said William 
Benett senior deceased for ever. 



One Messuage or tenement cum pertinenciis and one close of meadow 
adjoyneing to the same lyeing on the North part of Marlborough held 
of the Burrough of Marlborough in free Burgage value per annum ultra 
reprisas K : I s : 4 a : 

Demised by another Indenture of the William Benett senior dated 
3 Ocf 6 Ja : 1 [1608] to one William York and Anne Stampe late the 
wife of the said William York for their lives and the life of the survivor 
L. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. T 



266 The Society's MSS. Quiclhampton. 

And afterwards by the will of the said William Benett senior dated 
30 Dec r 6 Ja: 1 [1608] devised to the said Major and Burgesses for ever 
To the intent that the profits thereof should be given to the poor of the 
same village for their better support and maintenance. 

The Re vercion of one Messuage or tenement with the appurtenaunces 
and divers lands meadows and pastures cum pertinenciis in Blunsden in 
com' Wilts to the said Messuage belonging depending upon the estate 
for life of Acreman value per annum 0": 5 s : d . 

Devised by the same will to Thomas Tisdale and his heirs to the intent 
that the said Thomas should within one year after his decease convey 
and assure the same to the releife and maintenance of six poor boys in 
Abingdon School to be nominated by the said Thomas during his life 
and in theire places to choose others by the Major part of that Hospitall. 

4 Nov r 7 Ja : 1 [1609] A Generall Livery under value granted 
to Balph Benett brother and heir of William 
Benett which William was the brother and heir of William Benett 
senior {sic) of all the premises contained in the Estimate above wherein 
after mentioning of the said severall Settlements and Devise of the 
9 th Aprill the ll*h May and 3 d Octob r 6° Begis Jacobi : 1 : and the will 
of the said William Benett senior dated 30 th Dec r . the same year The I 
said Generall Livery did further take notice That the said William Benett I 
senior dyed the 19 th Feb'T. then last past And that the said Anne was | 
his relict and was then liveing And that Balph Benett gent' was brother I 
and next heir of the said William Benett senior deceased and was of i 
the age of 40 years and upwards at the death of the said William And 
that the scite of the Mansion house of Sennington and other the premises 
in Sevenhampton were held in capite (viz 4 .) by the 40 th part of a Knights 
Fee And that the tenement and toft of land and other the premisses in i 
Wroughton, the Jury were ignorant of whom the same were held And 
that the said Messuages land and closes in Marlborough were held of the u 
Burrough of Marlborough in free soccage And that the jury were 
ignorant of whom the premises in Blunsden were held And inasmuch as 
the said Balph Benett was of age, the rents and profits of all the premisses 
in Costow and Wroughton and the third part of the rest of the premisses 
being of the value of 56 s . 6 d . | £ halfe farthing from the death of the said 
William Benett to the 6 th July then past which was due to the King in 
his Court of Wards and Liverys, the said Balph Benett had paid the 
same as by certificate appeared The said King for the consideracion of 
8 d . paid into the hanaper Did respite the homage of the said Balph Benett 
and delivered to him the premisses aforesaid in Costow and Wroughton 
and the third part of the residue of the premisses and taken his fealty. 
It was therefore comanded that sufficient security being taken from the 
said Ralph for payment of a reasonable releife for the premisses aforesaid 
in Costow and Wroughton and for the third part of the rest of the 
premisses which by the death of the said William Benett the elder were 






The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 267 

seized into the king's hands together with the profits received from the 
death of the said William Benett senior to the said 6th day of July, that 
full seizin thereof should be delivered Saveing to every one their right. 

9 Janry 8 Ja : 1 : [1610—11] An Exemplification of all the pro- 
ceedings relateing to the same prem- 
isses contained in the Estimate and Generall Livery above at the request 
of S r - John Bennett. 

William Benetb died in February, and on the first of March 
following, 1608-9, Sir John had escaped from some at any rate of 
the conditions imposed upon him by the indenture of 16th June 
previous. Subject to the lease of 7th May, he became prospective 
owner of the estate in Costow in fee : — 

(67) 
1 March, 6 Ja: 1 1608 [1608-9]. Lycence from the King to S r Jn» 
Morley Edw a . Morley Esq 1 "- and James Kirton in consideration of 33 3 . to 
alienate the Mannor of Costow cum pertinenciis in Wilts' to S r Jn° 

^ Bennett senior and John Bennett junior son and heir of the said S r John 
Bennett senior 
Sir John meanwhile assigned the lease of 7 May to Jeremy 
Warner and another : — 

(68) 
18 March, 1608 [1608-9] By Indenture Between S r John Bennett 
of the one part and Jeremy Warner and Thomas Sanford of the other 
part the said S r John Bennett Keciteing the lease of the 7th May 6 Jac. 
1 and the Indenture of the 10th May and the Indenture of the 16 June 
the same year for good consideracions Did grant alien assigne and sett 
over to the said Jeremy Warner and Thomas Sanford the first recited 
Indenture of lease and all the Messuages lands tenements, &c. and all 
other things by the said recited Indenture granted cum pertinenciis and 
the remainder of the terme To hold to the said Jeremy Warner and 
Thomas Sanford their Executors and assignes from the sealing thereof 
for the remainder of the term of 99 years If Anne Bennett William 
Bennett and Mathewe Bennett sons of the said S r John Bennett should 
so long live subject to the Trusts mencioned in the Indenture of the 
16 June then last past 

Subject to a Proviso for makeing void this Indenture upon pay- 
ment of l 3 . to the said Jeremy Warner and Thomas Sanford their 
Executors or administrators 

Four days later Sir John Benett bought the fee of the " manor 
r farm of Costowe," previously described as " the Two Tenements 
i Costowe," and, in a subsequent conveyance as the " grange or 

T 2 



268 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

farm of Costowe." Why the Morleys and Mr. Kivton conveyed, 
rather than the Earl of Hertford could only appear hy the settle- 
ments, &c, affecting the Seymour family and their estates : — 

(69) 
22 March This Indenture made the Two and Twentith daie of March 
1608-9 1608 And in the yere of the reigne of our Soveraigne Lorde 
James by the grace of Godkinge of England Scotland Fraunce 
and Ireland defender of the faith &c. that is to saie of England Fraunce 
and Ireland the sixth and of Scotland the two and fortith Betwene S r John 
Morley of Halnaker alias Halfnaked in the countie of Sussex knight 
Edward Morley of the Inner Temple London esquire, and James Kyrton 
of Almesford in the countie of Sommersett esquire of thone partie And 
S r John Benet of the Cittie of London knight and John Benet the younger 
of Greyes Inne in the countie of Middlesex Esquire, sonne and heire 
apparent of the said Sr John Benet of thother partie Witnesseth that 
the said S r John Morley Edward Morley and James Kyrton aswell for 
and in consideracion of the somme of seaven hundred poundes of good 
and lawfull money of England to them in hande at and before thensealling 
and delivery of theis presentes by the said S r John Benet trulie paid And 
of the somme of twelve pence to them in hand paid by the said John 
Benet the younger, whereof and wherewith the said S r John Morley 
Edward Morley and James Kyrton doe acknowledge themselves and 
every of them to be fully satisfied contented and paid And thereof and of 
every parte thereof they doe clerelie acquite and discharge the said S 1 ' John 
Benet and John Benet the younger their heires executors and adminis- 
trators and every of them forever by theis presentes And also for and 
upon certein other good and lawfull causes and reasonable consideracions 
them hereunto specially movinge Have graunted bargayned sold aliened 

and confirmed and by theis presentes doe bargayne sell 

. . . . . . unto the said S r John Benet knight and John Benet the 

younger their heires and assignes for ever All that the Mannor or farme 
of Costowe with thappurtenaunces in the countie of "Wiltess' And all 

those messuages edifices and hereditamentes whatsoever 

scituat in the townes villages parish or parishes hanilettes | 

feildes or places called or knowen by the name or names of Costowe and ' 
"Wroughton or in either of them in the said countie of Wiltess' to the said ' 

Mannor or farme belonging And also all commons and I 

commons of pasture belonging to the said I 

premisses And the reversion .... together ' 

with all writinges .... To have and to holde 

. . . . to the said S r John Benet knight and John Benet the younger 
their heires and assignes for ever to and for thonely use and behoof of ' 

the said S r John Benet and John And the said James ! 

Kyrton .... doth covenaunt and graunt .... that for and 
notwithstanding any acte or actes heretofore . . done . . . or ' 
hereafter to be . . . done ... by the right honorable Edward I 
Earle of Hertford, and by the said James Kyrton, S r John Morley and i 



The Society's MSS. Qmdhampton. 269 

Edward Morley or by any of them to the contrary they the said James 
Kyrton S r John Morley and Edward Morley at thensealling and 

delivery of theis presentes are rightfully and solie 

seized in theire or some or one of their demeasne as of fee of and 

in all the said Mannor or Farme of Costowe 

of a good . . . . estate in the lawe in fee simple ..... 

And that All and singuler the said Mannor or Farme 

may abide to the said S r John Benet and John .... free and 

clear well and sufficiently saved and kept harmeles by 

the said James Kyrton .... from all other bargaynes 

. ; . . Except onely one lease by indenture bearing date the 
seaventh day of May last past .... made by the said Edward 
Earle of Hertford to the said S r John Benet of the said Mannor or Farme 
of Costowe and other the premisses for the terme of fowerskore and 
nynetene yeres Yf Anne the then wife of William Benet thelder and 
William Benet and Mathewe Benet sonnes of the said S r John Benet 
or anyone of them .... should so longe . . live Whereupon 
the yerely rent of fower poundes eight shillinges and fower pence is 
reserved Which said yerely rent . . . shall from henceforth be 
yerely . . . paid to the said S r John Benet and John .... 
And the said James Kyrton . . . doth also covenant .... 
that they the said Sir John Benet and John .... may . . 
peaceably .... enjoy All the said Mannor or Farme of Costowe 

. . . . without any interupcion of or by the said 

Edward Earle of Hertford and James Kyrton or either of them . . . 
. . . . And also that he the said James Kyrton and his heires and 
Edward Seymour esquire commonly called Lord Beauchamp and the 
heires males of the bodie of the said Edward Seymour .... shall 
and will at all and every tyme . . . during the space of tenne yeres 
next .... upon the . . . request and at thonly costes and 
charges in the lawe of the said S r John Benet and John .... 
execute .... all and every such further . . . act .... 
for . . . the better . . . conveying or assuring ... all 
the said Mannor or Farme of Costowe ... to the said S r John 
Benet and John . . . as by the said S r John Benet and John . . . 
shalbe .... devised and required .... And the said 
James Kyrton . . . doth also covenant .... that he . 
will . . . deliver . . . myniments . . . And the said 
Sir John Morley and Edward Morley . . . . covenant .... 
that the said Mannor or Farme . . . shall or maye remayne . . . 
to the said S r John Benet and John .... discharged ... of 
. all ... . former . . . gifts 

Yeoven the day and yere first above written 

Jo: Morley Ed: Morley James Kyrton 

Seals, cut off. Memorandums of acknowledgment, by Kirton, the day 
and yeare above written, before Thomas Bidley, Master in Chancery, 
by Edward Morley, 28 May, 1609, before John Drury, Master in Chan- 
cery, and by John Morley 21 April, 1609, before the said John Drury. 



270 The Society s MSS. Quidhampton. 

Endorsed. Sealed and delivery by Kyrton in the presence of Robert 
Bankworth, scrivener, and Thomas Tasker his servant, by Sir John 
Morley in the presence of Gar : Williamson and John Pey and by 
Edward Morley in the presence of Williamson, Pey, John Cooke and 
Tho : Randall. 

Also " No. 16." 

Also Memorandum of enrolment on the dorse of the Close Roll, 10 
May, 7 James, by John Gore. 

No. 119. 

It may probably be taken as an illustration of the insecurity of 
almost any title to land at this date — and it is difficult, in Wilt- 
shire at any rate, to find an acre of land that has not been at some 
time litigated — that seven years later Sir John Benet found it 
necessary to take a further conveyance of Costowe from the earl 
himself and certain other persons. The letters patent referred to 
— in the margin of the "Abstract " occur the words " Q. The 
Letters patents " — take the form of a grant by King James, in 
consideration of 1921i. 7s. 9d., to the Earl of Hertford, Francis 
Seymour, Gilbert Prinne, knt., Eichard Wheler, esq., and James 
Kirton, of lands, &c, in Wilts, Dorset, and Somerset, forfeited j 
by Edward, duke of Somerset, some of which — the manor of 
Symondsbury, co. Dorset, for instance — had been restored to the I 
duke's heirs and since sold by them — as doubtless was the case with 
regard to Costowe itself. But it would be out of place to enquire 
in the matter of so small a thing as Costowe (it is named in the 
letters) into the history of the issuing of Letters Patent which 
include such splendours of the Seymour inheritance as the forest of < 
Savernake, &c The Letters, as affecting the Exchequer, are 
enrolled on the Originalia Boll, 10 James, part 1, fo. lxxv. : — 

(70) 
10 Jan>\ This Indenture made the Tenth daie of Januarie in the 
1616-7. yeares of the raigne of our soveraigne Lord James by the grace 
of God of England Scotland France and Ireland Kinge defender 
of the faith &c. that is to saie of England France and Irelande the fower- 
teenth And of Scotland the fiftieth Annoque Domini 1616 Betweene the 
right honorable Sir Edward Sejnnour Knight Baron Beauchamp and 
Earle of Hertford Sir Francis Seymour Knight one of the grandchildren 
of the said Earle and Sir Gilbert Prynne of Allington in the countie of 
Wiltes' Knight of the one parte And Sir John Bennett thelder of 
London knight of the other parte Witnesseth That the said Earle Sir 
Francis Seymour and Sir Gilbert Prynne for and in consideracion of a 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 2*1 '1 

certeyne somme of good and lawfull money of England to him the said 
Earle in hande paied by the said Sir John Bennett whereof the said 
Earle acknowledged the receipfce and himselfe to be well and truelie 
paied and thereof and of everie parte and parcell thereof They the said 
Earle Sir Francis Seymour and Sir Gilbert Prynne doe fullie and 
absolutlie acquitte exonerate and discharge the said Sir John Bennett 
his heires executors administrators and assignes and everie of them by 
theis presentes Have granted enfeoffed and confirmed and by theis 
presentes do grant enfeoffe and confirme unto the said Sir John Bennett 
his heires and assignes for ever All that their Graunge or Farme of 
Costowe with his rightes members and appurtenaunces in the Countie of 

Wiltes' And all and singuler messuages landes . . . 

. . hereditamentes and appurtenaunces to the said Graunge or Farme 

belonginge beinge in Costowe And all 

the estate of the said Earle Sir Francis Seymour and Sir 

Gilbert Prynne of in and to the premisses As fullie 

as the said Graunge Farme and premisses 

were amongst diverse other thinges by our said Soveraigne lord the 
kinges Majestie that nowe is by his highnes letters pattentes under the 
gjreate seale of England bearinge date at Westminster the Thirty th daie 
of Julie in the yeares of his Majesties gracious and happie raigne of 
England France and Ireland the Tenth and of Scotland the sixe and 
fortyth granted conveyed and assured to them the said Earle Sir 
Francis Seymour and Sir Gilbert Prynne Bichard Wheler esquire 
deceased and James Kyrton esquire their heires and assignes (which said 
James Kyrton hath released all his estate and interest therein to the 
saide Earle Sir Francis Seymour and Sir Gilbert Prynne their heires and 
assignes for ever) To have and to hold the said Graunge or Farme 

to him the said Sir John Bennett his heires and assignes 

for ever to the onlie proper use and behoofe of him the said Sir John 
Bennett his heires and assignes for ever And the said Earle Sir 
Francis Seymour and Sir Gilbert Prynne for them and their heires doe 
grant that they and their heires all and singuler the said Graunge or 

Farme to him the said Sir John Bennett his heires and 

assignes for ever against them the said Earle Sir Francis 

Seymour and Sir Gilbert Prynne and their heires will 

warrant . . . and for ever defende by theis presentes And lastlie 
the said Earle Sir Francis Seymour and Sir Gilbert Prynne have made 

•constituted .... and by theis presentes doe make 

and in their place putt their trustie and wellbeloved in Christ John 
Sadler of Wroughton in the countie of Wiltes' gent' Giles Francklyn of 
Wroughton aforesaid gent and William Yorke of Wroughton aforesaid 
yeoman their true and lawfull attorneys .... seizin .... 

to deliver to the said Sir John Bennett or to his certeyne 

attorney In witness whereof 

E. Hertford. Seal, quarterly of six 
Fit. Seymour Seal, crest of Seymour 
Gilbert Prynne Seal, cut off". 



272 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

Endorsed. Sealed and delivered in the presence of 
Ni : Hyde 
James Kyrton 
Joh : Kent 
Alby : Muston 

Also Memorandum of livery of seisin 10 March, 1616 [1616-17] 14 
James by Giles Francklin who " did .... enter into the mansion 
howse of the grange or ferme of Costowe " and delivered seisin to "John 
Spenser attorney of the withinnamed S r John Benett knight by him 
lawfully authorised by writing under his hand and seale " . . . "in 
the presence of us whose names are hereunder written John Sadler 
William Sadler the marke W of William Yorke senior Thomas Francklyn 
John Sadler junior Edwarde Yorke James Spackman the marke of John 
Whitborne Richard Spackman E his marke: Also Giles Francklyn. 
John Spenser. 



Also "No. 17. 



No. 120. 



Sir John's letter of attorney to Spencer and others to receive 

seisin, follows : — 

(71) 
21 February, To all Christian people to whome this present writing 
1616-7. shall come I S r John Benet thelder of London Knight send 
greeting Whereas the right honorable S r Edward Seymour 
Knight Baron Beauchampe, and Erie of Hertford, S r Frauncis Seymour 
Knight, one of the Grandchildren of the said Erie, and S r Gilbert Prynne 
of Allington in the countie of Wiltess' Knight by an indenture or dede 
indented under their handes and sealles bearing date the Tenth daie of 
Januarie last past before the date of theis presentes (for the consideracion 
therein expressed) have graunted enfeoffed and confirmed or are men- 
cioned to graunt, enfeoff and confirme unto me the said S r John Benet 
my heires and assignes forever, All that their Graunge or Farme of 
Costowe with his rightes members and appurtenaunces in the countie 
of Wiltes', And all and singuler messuages, houses, edifices, buildinges, 
landes, tenementes medowes leasowes, pastures feadynges, comons, 
woodes underwoodes rentes reversions, customes and services, profits, 
comodities, hereditamentes and appurtenaunces to the said Graunge or 
Ferine belonging or in anywise apperteyning, or accepted, reputed, de- 
mised, used letten or enjoyed as parte parcell or member thereof, or of 
or belonging to the same scituatelieing and being in Costowe in the said 
Countie of Wiltes'. In and by which indenture or dede indented, the 
said Erie, S r Frauncis Seymour and S>' Gilbert Prynne have made consti- 
tuted ordeyned, appointed, and in their place have putt John Sadler 
gent', Giles Francklyn gent' and William York yoman, their true and 
lawfull Attorneis jointly and severally for them and in their names and 
places into the said Graunge, Farme and premisses and into every or I 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 273 

any part thereof in the name of the wholle to enter, And thereof or of 
any part thereof in the name of the wholle, full and peaceable possession 
and seizen to have and take, And after such possession and seizin so 
thereof had and taken, to give and deliver to me the said S r . John 
Benet, To have and to hold the same to me the said S r - John Benet 
my heires and assignes according to the true intent and meaning of the 
said indenture or to my certeine Attorney in that behalf As by the said 
indenture or dede indented if due relacion be had more fully and at large 
it doth and maie appeare Now knowe yee That I the said S r John 
Benet have assigned, made, ordeined and in my stead and place by 
these presentes putt and constituted my trustie freindes John Spenser of 
Quidhampton in the parish of Wroughton in the countie of Wiltes gent', 
Olyver Brunsell dark Vicar of "Wroughton aforesaid and John Whithurne 
of Wroughton aforesaid yeoman and every of them my true and lawfull 
Attorney and Attornies jointly and severally for me the said S r John 
Benet and in my name and to the onely use of me the said S r John 
Benet my heires and assignes according to the purport and true meaning 
of the said indenture to receive and take of and by the delivery of the 
said John Sadler, Giles Francklyn and William York or of either or any 
of them full and peceable possession and seizein of and in all the said 
Graunge Farme and other the premisses, and of every or any of them or 
of any part or parcell of them or of any of them (in the name of the 
wholle) And the same so had and taken, for me and to my use to kepe 
Giveing and by theis presentes graunting to my said Attornies and to 
every of them jointly and severally my full power and lawfull auctoritie 
for me and in my name to doo and execute or cause to be done and exe- 
cuted, All and whatsoever els shalbe mete requisite or nedefull to be done 
in or about the premises or any part or parcell thereof as amplie as I 
my self lawfullie maie or might doe if I were present and did the same 
personally. Ratifieing confirmeing & allowing all and whatsoever my 
said Attornies afore named or any of them jointlie or severallie shall 
lawfully doe or cause to be done in or about the premisses or any part 
thereof to the use above specified by theis presentes In witnes whereof 
I the said S r John Benet have hereunto set my hand and seall. Yeoven 
the one and twentith daie of Februarye 1616, And in the yere of 
of the reigne of our Sovereigne Lord James by the grace of God King 
of England, Scotland Fraunee and Ireland defender of the faith &c. 
(that is to saie) of England Fraunee and Ireland the fourtenth and of 
Scotland the fiftith . 

Jo : Benet 
Endorsed. Sealed and delivered by the within named S r John Benet 
Knight in the presence of Jo : Benet 

Humfu : Man 

GlLBT. WlNSHAM (?) 

Costow (No. 18). No. 121. 

Four years later Sir John Benet makes over to his son William,, 
then of age, presumably (1) the lease of Costowe, (2) Cokharris : — 



.274 The Society's MSS. QvAdhavvpton. 

(72) 

26 May, This Indenture made the sixe and twentyeth daye of May 
1621. in the yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord James by 
the Grace of God of England France and Ireland King, 
Defender of the Fayth etc. the nineteenth and of Scotland the fowre and 
fiftyeth Betweene S r John Benet th'elder of the Citty of London Knight 
on the one party, and William Benet the third sonne of the sayd S r John 
Benet of Grayes Inne in the County of Middlesex Gentleman on th'other 
party, Whereas the Right Honorable S 1 ' Edward Seymour knight Baron 
of Beauchamp Earle of Hertford by an indenture of lease vnder his hand 
and seale bearing date the seventeenth daye of May in the sixt yeare of 
the raigne of our Soveraigne Lorde King James over England for the 
considerations therein specifyed did demyse betake and to ferme lett to 
the sayd S r John Benet his executors administrators and assignees All 
those his messuage and toft heretofore demised called or knowne by the 
name of two tenements scituate lying and being in Costowe in the 
County of Wilts neere vnto the sayd Earle his Grange called Studley 
Grange in the sayd County of Wiltes together with all orchards gardens 
inward and outward courts or yardes howses edifices buildings barnes 
and all other his arable lands meadowes pastures feedings and other 
hereditaments to the sayd mesuage or toft or two tenements or to eyther 
of them belonging or in any wise appertaining lying and being within 
the parish of Wroughton in the sayd County of Wilts late in the tenure 
manurance or occupation of William Benet th'elder of Maryborough in 
the County of Wilts Esquire or of his assignee or assignees together with 
all commons commodityes common of pasture wayes easementes and 
profitts to the said premisses belonging or in any wise appertayning 
in as large ample and beneficiall manner and forme as the sayd William 
Benet th'elder or his assignees had or at any time held occupied or 
injoyed the same (except as in the sayd indenture is excepted) To have 
and to hold all and singular the prcemisses witli theyrand every of theyr 
appurtenaunces (except as in the sayd indenture is excepted) Vnto the 
sayd S r John Benet his executors administrators and assignees from the 
feast of the Annuntiation of the Blessed Virgin S' Mary then last past 
for the terme of fowerscore and nineteene yeares (if Anne Benet wife of 
the sayd William Benet th'elder of Maryborough, William Benet and 
Matthew Benett sonnes of the sayd S r . John Benet or any of them 
should so long live) for and vnder such rent exceptions conditions 
covenants articles and agreements as in and by the sayd indenture of 
lease (whereto reference being had) are reserved mentioned expressed and 
contayned and thereby more at large appeareth, And whereas by one 
other indenture bearing date the sixteenth daye of June in the sixt yeare 
of our Soveraigne Lord King James over England between S r John 
Benet of the Citty of London knight on the one part, and the sayd 
William Benet of Maryborough in the County of Wilts Esquire brother 
of the said S r John Benet on the other part it is witnessed that the true 
intent meaning and agreement of the sayd S r John Benet and 
William Benet th'elder was that the sayd S 1 ' John Benet his executors 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 275 

and assignees should stand possessed of the prcemisses during the 
continuance of the said terme, and should hold the same vpon 
the trusts and confidences and to the vses and behoofes of him the 
sayd William Benet th'elder and the hey res of his body lawefully 
begotten, And if it happen the sayd William Benet th'elder to dye 
without any issue, then to the proper vse and behoofe of th' executors 
administrators and assignees of the sayd William Benet th' elder vntil 
th'end of five yeares next ensuing after the death of William Benet the 
-elder, And afterwards and from thenceforth to the vse and behoofe of 
William Benet sonne of the sayd S r John Benet and of the heyres of his 
body lawefully begotten or to be begotten, with divers remainders over, 
as more at large (if relation be had to the sayd indenture) doth and may 
appeare. Nowe this Indenture witnesseth that the sayd S 1 ' John Benet 
for and in consideration of naturall love and affection to the sayd 
William Benet his third sonne, as likewise in performance and 
accomplishment of the trust and confidence reposed in him the sayd 
Sr John Benet by the sayd William Benet th'elder of the prcemisses to 
±o the only vse benefitt and behoofe of th' afore mentioned William 
Benet the third sonne of the sayd S r John Benet his executors and 
assignees, as of the free gift to him thereof by th'aforesayd William 
Benet th'elder his Uncle proceeding of and from his naturall love and 
affection vnto him the sayd William Benet third sonne of S r John 
Benet according to the true intent purpose and meaning of him the 
sayd William Benet th'elder, as by the aforesaid indenture may 
appeare, hath given granted assigned set over and executed, and by 
these presents doth give grant assign sett over and fully execute in 
present possession all that his estate title interest possession right or 
terme of fower score and nineteen yeares, if Anne Benet late wife 
of • William Benett th'elder, William Benet of Grayes Inne, and 
Matthew Benet sonnes of S»' John Benet shall live soe long, of all 
that his mesuage and toft called or knowne by the name of two 
tenements scituate lying and being in Oostowe in the county of Wilts 
neere unto Studley Grange in the sayd county of Wilts, together with 
all orchards gardens inward and outward courts or yards houses edifices 
buildings barnes stables and all other his arable lands meadowes pastures 
feedings and other hereditaments to the sayd messuage or toft or two 
tenements or to eyther of them belonging or in any wise appertaining, 
lying and being within the parish of Wroughton in the sayd county of 
Wilts late in the tenure of William Benet th'elder or of his assignee or 
assignees, and nowe or late in th'occupation and manurance of 
William Yorke of Saltrop or of his assignee or assignees, To have 
and to hold all th'aforementioned prcemisses with theyre appurtenances 
whatsoever to him the sayd William Benet his third sonne of Grayes 
Inne in the county of Middlesex in as full ample and large manner* 
as he the sayd Sir John Benet or his assignees did enioye 
and occupy the same. Provided neverthelesse because the sayd 
S r John Benet did allwayes intend the inheritance of the prcemisses 
to his sayd sonne William, and that the sayd William Benet the elder 



276 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

intended (as by the aforesayd indenture is mentioned) that the sayd 
William Benet of Grayes Inne should and might be able to make hia 
wife a joynture out of the prcemisses, that nowe his sayd sonne William 
Benet may by force of these presents, if he the sayd William Benet shall 
marry and take a wife, change any one life, and putt her name instead 
thereof as a livelyhood for her during her naturall life, As alsoe 
that his sayd sonne William in regard of the due debt of one hundred 
pounds that he meanes to discharge for his sayd Father to John Vawer 
of Christchureh in the University of Oxon clarke may sell fell cutt downe 
and carry away to his owne proper vse benefitt and behoofe one hundred 
and fifty of the best trees growing or being vpon the prcemisses 
at any time at his pleasure, And whereas the sayd S r John Benet is 
possess'd and stands nowe seized vpon like trust and confidence of other 
lands of inheritance called or commonly knowen by the name of Quinteyns 
Lands with all th'appurtenances to the same belonging or appertayning 
in the parish of Wroughton in the County of Wilts aforesayd, to him and 
his heyres in fee simple to the only proper vse and behoofe of him the 
sayd William Benet his third sonne and the heyres of his body, as of the 
guift of William Benet the elder to him the sayd William Benet third 
sonne of S r John Benet as aforesayd, He the sayd S 1 ' John Benet hath 
given granted and executed and by these presents doth fully execute give 
and absolutely grant to the said William Benet his sonne aforesayd All 
the prcemisses with th' appurtenances to the same belonging or anyways 
appertayning, To have hold and enioye all the prcemisses whatsoever in 
as full large ample and beneficiall manner as he the sayd S r John Benet 
or his assignees hathe or nowe doth enjoye the same. In witnesse 
whereof the parties above named have sett to theyre hands and seales. 
Yeoven the daye and yeare above written. 

Jo : Benet 
indorsed. Sealed and delivered in the presence of vs 

Arthur Duck 

Geo : Lister. 

John Copinger 

No. 123. 

At this point an important, but undated, document is inserted 
in the " abstract " : — 

(73) 
A Copy of an Indenture Between S r John Bennett senior and S r John 
Bennett junior Kn' son and heir of S r John Bennett senior of the one 
part and S r Robert Lee Kn l and Francis Gregory Esq,- of the other part 
Whereby the s d S r John Bennett sen r in consideration of natural love 
and affeccion which he bore to Dame Leonora his wife and Thomas 
Bennett [Mathewe Bennett] and Michaell Bennett sons of S r John 
Bennett sen r and Mary Bennett Dorothy Bennett and Margarett Bennett 
daughters of S r John Bennett sen r and for a provision for Thomas, 
Mathew, Michael Mary Dorothy and Margarett It was covenanted and 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 277 

agreed between all the partys and S r John Bennett senr and S r John 
Bennett junr did covenant and agree with S r Robert Lee and Francis 
Gregory their heirs and assignes That the s d S r John Bennett sen r and 
S r John Bennett junr should before All Saints day then next at the costs 
of Sr John sen r Levy a fine with proclamacions to the s a S r Robert Lee 
and Francis Gregory and their heirs or the heirs of one of them 

Of the Mannor or Farme of Costowe cum pertinenciis in Wilts' and 
of all those messuages outhouses &c. in Costowe and Wroughton and also 
all commons &c. ; and of all the capitall messuage in Woxbridge alias 
"Oxbridge in com' Midi's with the barns outhouses, &c. four parcells of 
meadow in Uxbridge near the mansion house one part called Great 
Meadow another Little meadow "Woodcocks Close Bakers Close ; all those 
messuages lands tenements &c. called Woodlands containing 8 acres in 
White Chappell parish, and all other the messuages lands &c. lyeing in 
or near Whitechappell ; Little Cross Key Meade alias Washing Block 
Meade containing 3 acres cum pertinenciis in Hillingdon in the tenure of 
Michael Page ; nine acres in Cross Key Mead in Hillingdon predicta ; a 
messuage in Uxbridge in the tenure of Mathew Baker ; another messuage 
called Fend Garden Plott in occupacion of Roger Henlo alias Jordan ; 
and another messuage in occupacion of Thomas Barrett and a parcel of 
land belonging to s a messuage ; and two messuages where late was but 
one in Uxbridge in possession of Edmund Carely and Owen Evan ; and 
of two other messuages where lately was but one in Uxbridge in poss- 
ession of George Gascoigne and Thomas Henlo ; and of a close contain- 
ing two acres in occupacion of John Garrett and all woods &c. ; and of 
two acres of meadow ground lyeing in Southmead in Denham in Bucks 
in tenure of Edw a Thompson; and of another messuage in Uxbridge ; 
and of a messuage in Booles occupacion ; and severall other landes tene- 
mentes &c. in the deed mencioned 

The use of which fine was declared to be as followeth (viz'.) As for 
and concerneing the messuages lands and hereditaments of S 1 ' John 
sen r in Whitechappell S l Buttolph without Aldgate and Houndsditch To 
the use of S r John Bennett senr and Dame Leonora his wife for their 
lives and the life of the survivor And after the decease of the survivor 
To the use of the first son of the body of S r John sen'' and Dame 
Leonora and to the heirs of the body of such begotten son And for de- 
fault of such issue To the use of the 2 nd 3 rd 4"' 5 th 6 th 7 th 8 th 9 th 10 th llt h 
12 th and all other the sons of the body of the s d John and the heirs of 
their bodys successively And for default of such issue To the use of 
Michael Bennett and the heirs of his body And for default of such issue 
To the use of Mary Margarett and Dorothy Bennett and the heirs of 
their bodys And for default of such issue To the use of Thomas Bennett 
and Mathew Bennett their heirs and assignes for ever 

And as concerning the mannor [of] Costowe cum pertinenciis in Cos- 
towe and Wroughton To the use of S r Robert Lee and Francis Gregory 
their heirs and assignes for ever. 

And as concerneing the messuages in Aldermanbury To the use of 
S 1 ' John Bennett jun r for 40 years if Sr John senr should so long live 



278 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

And after 40 years expired To the use of S r John Bennett sen* and 
Dame Leonora his wife for their lives and the life of the survivor And 
after their decease To the use of S r Robert Lee and Francis Gregory 
their heirs and assignes for ever. 

And as concerneing all other the premises whereof no use was declared 
To the use of the s d S r John Bennett sen r and Dame Leonora for their 
lives and the life of the survivor And after the decease of the survivor 
To the use of the first son of the body of S r John sen r and his s d wife 
and the heirs of the body of such first son And for default of such issue 
To the use use of the 2 a son of S r John sen r and the heirs of the body 
of such 2 d son and so on to the twelfth son and the heires of their respec- 
tive bodyes Remainder to the right heires of the said S r Robert Lee and 
Francis Gregory their heires and assignes for ever 

In 1626, five-and-a-half years after he was put into possession 
of it by his father, "William Benet suffered a recovery of Cokharris 
to Eobert Lewis, Esq., to bar entails, &c. In 1561 (No. 52 above} 
it was described as a toft and 81a. It now figures as a toft and 

80a. :— 

(74) 
28 Nov. Carolus Dei gracia Anglie Scocie Francie et Hibernie rex 
1626 fidei defensor &c. Omnibus ad quos presentes litere nostre 
pervenerint Salutem Sciatis quod inter placita terre irrotulata 
apud Westmonasterium coram Ricardo Hutton' milite Francisco Harvey 
Georgio Crooke milite et Henrico Yelverton milite justiciariis nostris de 
Banco De termino saneti Michaelis anno regni nostri secundo [Oct, — 
Nov., 1626] Rotulo xlvij continetur sic. Wiltes' ss. Robertus Lewys 
armiger in propria persona sua petit versus "Willeltnuin Benet armigerum 
unum toftum viginti acras terre viginti acras prati et quadraginta acras 
pasture cum pertinenciis in Wroughton ut jus et hereditatem suam Et in 
que idem Willelmus non habet ingressuni nisi post disseisinam quam 
Hugo Hunt inde injuste et sine judicio fecit prefato Roberto infra triginta 
annos jam ultimo elapsos &c. Et unde dicet quod ipsemet fuit seisitus 
de tenementis predietis cum pertinenciis in dominico suo ut de feodo et 
jure tempore pacis tempore dornini Regis nunc capiendo inde explecias 
ad valenciam &c. Et in que &c. Et inde producit sectam &c. Et pre- 
dictus Willelmus in propria persona sua venit et defendit jus suum quando 
&c. Et vocat inde ad warantiam Edwardum Howes qui presens est hie 
in curia in propria persona sua Et gratis tenementa predicta cum perti- 
nenciis ei warantizat Et super hoc predictus Robertus petit versus ipsuru 
Edwardum tenentem per warantiam suam tenementa predicta cum 
pertinenciis in forma predicta et unde dicit quod ipsemet fuit seisitus de 
tenementis predietis cum pertinenciis in dominico suo ut de feodo et jure 
tempore domini regis nunc capiendo inde explecias ad valenciam &c. Et 
in que kc. Et inde producit sectam &c. Et predictus Edwardus tenens 
per warantiam suam defendit jus suum quando &c. Et dicit quod 
predictus Hugo non disseisivit prefatum Robertum de tenementis predietis 



The Society's MSS. Qmdhampton. 279' 

cum pertinenciis prout idem Eobertus per breve et narracionem sua 
predicta superius supponifc Et de hoc ponit se super patriain &c. Et 
predictus Eobertus petit licentiam inde interloquendi Et habet &c. Et 
postea idem Robertus revenit hie in curia isto eodem termino in propria 
persona sua Et predictus Edwardus licet solempniter exactus non revenit 
set in contemptu curie recessit et defaltam facit Ideo consideratum est 
quod predictus Robertus recuperet seisinam suam versus prefatum 
Willelmum de tenernentis predictis cum pertinenciis Et quod idem 
Willelmus habeat de terra predicti Edwardi ad valenciam &c. Et idem 
Edwardus in misericordia Et super hoc predictus Robertus petit breve 
domini regis vicecomiti comitatus predicti dirigendum de habere faciendo 
ei plenariam seisinam de tenernentis predictis cum pertinenciis Et ei 
eonceditur retornabile hie in octabis sancti Hillarii &c. Que omnia et 
singula ad requisicionem predicti Willelmi Benet tenore presencium 
duximus exemplificanda In cujus rei testimonium sigillum nostrum ad 
brevia in Banco predicto sigillanda deputatum presentibus apponi fecimus 
Teste T. Richardson apud Westmonasterium xxviij die Novembris anno 
regni nostri secundo Gulston. 

Seal, cut of. Endorsed " No. 21." 

Ifo. 124. 
The above is the last document mentioned in the " abstract " 
whereof an original is extant. The following copy of William 
Benet's will occurs among these papers, but, as in the case of his 
uncle's will, is not included in the " abstract " : — 

(75) 
2 October, In the name of God Amen, the second day of October 
1635. 1635 and in the eleauenth yeare of our soueraigne Lord King 
Charles : I William Benet of Greys Inne in the County of 
Middlesex Esq 1- - an vnprofitable seruant of God, being in good health of 
body, and perfect disposeing memory, thankes bee to Allmighty God 
Doe make and constitute this my last will and testament in manner and 
forma following, That is to say, ffirst I commend my soule into the 
hands of my Creatour hopeing assuredly through the merits of Jesus 
Christ my Saviour to be made pertaker of euerlasting life, and I 
commend my body to the earth whereof it is made to bee buried where 
my executours shall appoynt in a very priuate manner without any 
blacks or mournings for my kinred or ffriends, giueing to the poore of 
the place ffiue marks, and what other dole or charges my executours 
shall hold conuenient at the time of my buriall. I ordaine and appoynt 
my executours of this my last will and testament my deare and loving 
brothers Thomas Benet D r - of the Ciuill Lawe and Matthew Benet 
Rector of the parsonage in the County of Middlesex (sic) and my kinde 
and louing brother in law ffrancis Gregory of Hordley in the County of 
Oxon Esqr- Whereas some ffoure or ffiue yeares agoe I made a will 
deposited in the hands of my brother D'- Thomas Benet, wherein I 
enlarged my selfe in beequests as my estate then was, now I wholely 
reuoke the same in euery part and particle, being my estate is diminished 



280 The Society's MSS. Qmclhampton. 

and much lessened as allsoe for some causes best knowne to my selfe, 
and make this my last and absolute will. I give to my brother 
Gregories eight children ffoure hundred pounds to be paid within halfe a 
yeare after my decease, that is to say threescore pounds a peece to 
Thomas, ffrancis, Elizabeth and Jane Gregory the ffoure elder children : 
to Eleanor, Winifrid, Henry and John Gregory the foure youngest, 
fforty pounds a peece ; and if any die before other not disposing of theyr 
parts, it shall bee equally diuided amongst them all. Item I giue to my 
brother Doctour Thomas Benet my lease of Salthrop in Wroughton in the 
County of Wiltes, with the house and household stuffe, and all things 
thereunto belonging. Item to my brother Mathew Benet, his heyres 
and assignes I giue my lease of Costowe in discharge of a annuity of 
ffifty pounds, which I am bound to pay him for his life, excepting out of 
the same lease of Costowe in the parish and county aforesaid the summe 
of twenty pounds currant money of England to bee paid quarterly at the 
Charterhouse neare London to Jerremy Warner, in discharge of one 
annuity of twenty pounds which my estate stands engaged to pay him 
for life, and if the said lease of Costowe shall expire before the death of 
the said Jerrimy Warner, then my will is that he resort to the lease at 
Salthrop for his assureance and satisfaction. Whereas my ffather left 
ffoure children by his second wife, Michaell Benet, Mary, Dorothy and j 
Margaret, I give to them and theyr heyres for euer my land of Quinteynes 
alias Cockarris in the parish of Wroughton in the County of Wiltes 
aforesaid, to bee sold and equally divided amongst them. And though 
my sister Margaret bee at this time dead, yet my minde is, that child of 
hers, sonne or daughter, I knowe not whether, shall have equall and 
iust portion out of the sale of the same land, and if any of them happen 
to die not disposeing of his or theyr part, it shall remaine equally to the 
survivours. This Quinteynes aunciently parcell of Canne Court is 
held in free soccage and payes noe tithes, as Canne Court is exempted 
and freed. Item I giue to my honest and carefull friend, and my 
ffathers auncient seruant Hierimy Warner of the Charterhouse neare 
London as a legacy of my good will twenty pounds lawfull money of 
England, togeather with my colour'd cloath cloake lined with plush. 
Item I give to my seruant ffrancis Lee twenty marks lawfull money of 
England. Soe reuokeing all former wills and testaments by mee here- 
tofore made, the residue of my goods to my executours, I declare this ' 
my last and only will, in testimony whereof I have put my hand and 
seale. 

William Benet. 
Sealed published and deliuered in the presence of Tho. Rater, 
William Metcalfe, Thomas Glouek. 

A codicill dated the eight and twentieth day of December A . Domini 
1636 to bee annexed to the last will and testament of mee William 
Benet, which last will and testament I have committed to the custody of 
my deare and louing brother ffrancis Gregory Esq r . which codicill to- 
geather with the said last will I doe hereby declare to bee my last will 
and testament Amen. Whereas by my said last will I have appoynted 



) 



The Society's MSS. Quidham'pton. 281 

that my lands in Wiltes sheire shall bee sold for the benefit of my three 
younger sisters, and haue not appoynted by whom the said land shall 
bee sold I doe hereby declare that my said lands shall be sold by my 
executours or the greater number of them, and the money thereof disposed 
to my said sisters and their children according as I have declared by my 
said last will and testament, with this prouiso that my will is to deduct 
the fourth part of the sale of these lands to the payment of my debts. 
And whereas I haue given ffoure hundred pounds to eight of my sister 
Gregories children, the ffoure eldest in a larger proportion then the 
younger, being somewhat doubtful of the expressing it fully in my will, 
if it prooue otherwise, then I leaue the ffoure hundred poundes to bee 
distributed by the hands of my brother Gregory according to his judge- 
ment and my intention. Item I giue to my brother Gregory my plush 
veluet cap, my spectacles, a paire of doeskinne gloues to be trimmed vp 
with the sad coloured ffrindge that lies in the trunke, and my swan skinne 
stomacher. Item to my sister Gregory I giue my watch. To my 
brother Mathew Benet I giue my crimson coloured cap with siluer lace 
and a fine linnen laced cap belonging to the same ; I giue him likewise 
the pictures of deaths head, with the letters of our Sauiour which he 
formerly bestowed on mee and a new Bible which he gaue me seauen 
yeares agoe, it lies at London, I giue it him ; I giue him my best beauer 
allsoe. To my cozen Elizabeth Gregory I giue my best trunke at Hord- 
ley. To my cosen Jane Gregory I giue my best-lookeing glasse, a paire 
of plaine greenish silke garters and knotts and my old silke wascoate. 
Item to my deare sister Dorothy Benet I giue a debt due vnto mee by 
Mr. Charles Child sometime of Allsoules in Oxon, the instructions 
whereof lies in my brother Doctor's hands ; if she will peticion my Lord 
Keeper God send her good lucke ; if not, it falls to my executours. Item 
to my cosen Thomas Gregory I giue my sword and Minshawes Dictionary. 
To ffrancis Gregory my cosen I give my last new coate lined with plush. 
To the ffoure younger nephewes and neeces I giue such small things as 
may be found in the trunkes that haue not beene worne. To my brother 
Gregorie I giue all my small bookes at Hordley and those that are about 
mee to be diuided amongst all his children at his discretion, excepting 
the choyce to bee first made by Mr. Evan ffloyd of two of the principall 
books. Item to William Crofts I giue thirty shillings, to Katherine and 
Joane seruants at Hordley I give twenty shillings a peece, and to old 
Richard there I giue a noble. Item to M ris Elizabeth Bayer I giue 
twenty shillings, to ffranc' Bayer my wife (sic) ffiue pounds, and I giue 
to Benedick Bayer my godsonne tenne pounds. Item to M ri " Joane 
Glouer daughter of John Glouer I give twenty nobles, and to Thomas 
Glouer her brother I giue ffiue marks, my cloath hat, and a paire of 
bowles. Item to my seruant ffrancis Lee I giue ffiue pounds, and my 
horse, bridle and saddle. To my painfull and carefull maide that 
attended mee [in] my long sicknes, Anne Boyd, I giue ffiue pounds. In 
witnes whereof I haue set my hand and seale 

William Benet 
XXXVI. — NO. CXII. U 



282 The Society s MSS. Quidhampton. 

Signed, sealed, published and deliuered as the codicill of my last will 
and testament in the presence of these subscribed 

Thomas Bayee, Philip Parsons, Ffeancis Lee. 

A codicill dated the third day of 
January 1636. 

Item I giue to Mr. Kayer, Maior of Woodstocke, thirtie shillings, that 
is to say tenne shillings for his paines, and the rest to bee bestowed 
according to his discretion. Item I giue to Mr. Thomas Abraham fforty 
shillings, as he and I haue agreed betweene vs, that is to say twenty 
shillings to one purpose, the other twenty for his paines and trust that I 
doe repose in him. Item I giue to my landlady M ris . Dunford twenty 
shillings, and to her maid a noble. Item I giue to M ris Hierons twenty 
shillings. Item I giue to goodwife Wright at the Parke gate twenty 
shillings. Item I giue to Edmond Paynter twenty shillings. Item I 
giue to Belcher tenne shillings. Item I giue to Abygall at the Bull tenne 
shillings William Benet 

Witnesse Ffeancis Lee. 

Endorsed. A Copie of Mr. Will : Benets will 2d. Octob : 1635. 

No. 126. j 

Two successive attempts at building up a Beuet estate in North- 
Wilts had thus failed, and as it appears by the above will, the 
testator contemplated the dispersal of what had been so far brought 
together. Possibly, however, he was well aware that his brother 
Thomas, afterwards Sir Thomas Benet, possessed both the means 
and the inclination to proceed further with the design : — 

(76) 

28 Nov r . 1637.' Enrolled in Chancery. By Indenture Between i 
Tho : Bennett D r of Lawes Francis Gregory Esq r & Mathew Benett ! 
cler' Executors of W ra . Bennett Esq r dec d . of the one part and W". Stede j 
and Martin Ailesworth D 1 ' of Lawes of the other part Keciteing that the 
said W m . Bennett being seized in fee of a tenement or toft in Costow in I 
Wroughton in com' Wilts' called Cockharris alias Quintins with severalh 
arrable landes meadows closes commons &c. And alsoe reciteing that |! 
being so seized by his will in writeing devised that the said tenement orl: 
toft called Quintins and the landes thereto belonging should be sold by| 
Thomas Bennett Francis Gregory and Mathew Bennett his executors' 1 
and the money disposed as per will The Indenture witnessed that; 
the said Thomas Bennett Francis Gregory and Mathewe Bennett! 
accordinge to the will and in consideration of 706" paid them by the saidl 
W m Stede and Martin Aileworth Did bargaine sell alien and confirme t0| 
the said W m . Stede and Martin Aileworth their heires and assignes The 
said tenement or toft in Costow called Cockharris alias Quintins and 



The Society's MSS. Qitidhampton. 283 

all the lands &c. thereto belonging and the reversions &c. and other the 
premises And all deedes writings and copyes of deeds &c. To hold to 
the s a W m Stede and Martin Aileworth their heires and assignes To the 
only use and behoofe of the said W m . Stede and Martin Aileworth their 
heires and assignes for ever. 

(77) 
Eodeni die. An agreement in paper between the same parties touching 
Quintins. 

(78) 
10 Nov r 1638 Enrolled in Chancery. By indenture Between 
W m . Stede and Martin Aileworth of the one part and Tho : Bennett of 
the other part It's witnessed that in consideration of a competent 
summe of money paied to the said Stede and Aileworth by the said 
Bennett [they] bargayned sold aliened and confirmed unto the said 
Bennett his heires and assignes the aforesaid toft lands and premisses 
To hold to the said Thomas Bennett [and] his heires for ever 

(79) 
20 Novr. 1640 By Deed Poll S r - Gabriell Lowe son and heire of 
S r Thomas Lowe (with the consent of Tho : Bennett Mathew Bennett 
cler' Michaell Bennett and Joseph Colson for good consideracion Did 
grant remise release ratify confirme and for ever quitt clayme unto 
"Thomas Gregory Gent' in his actuall possession being and to his heires 
and assigns for ever A Messuage cum pertinenciis in Aldermanbury 
then late in the tenure of Jn°. Bennett and then late in the possession of 
Tobias Dotchen And 2 messuages in Uxbridge in the occupacion of 
Sampson and Swift alias Mallett And the Mannor or Farme of Costow 
cum pertinenciis in Wroughton And the revercion &c. and all his de- 
mands thereto with a generall warranty against the s d Gabriell Lowe 
and his heirs. 

(80) 

1 st Dec r - 1640. Lycence to Thomas Gregory son and heire of Francis 

•Gregory Esq r - dec d . to alienate the Mannor of Costow cum pertinenciis 

To Thomas Bennett W in [Stede] and Thomas Brickenden their heires 

and assignes To the use and behoofe of the said Thomas Bennett W m . 

[Stede] and Thomas Brickenden their heires and assignes for ever 

(81) 
11 th Dec 1 '- 1640. By indenture between Mathew Bennett cler.' 
Michaell Bennett Joseph Colston and Thomas Gregory son and heir of 
Francis Gregory (which Francis Gregory surviv'd S 1 ' Rob'. Lee) of the 
•one part, and Thomas Bennett W m . Stede and Thomas Brickenden jur r . 
of the other part, The said Tho : Gregory in consideration of 5 s . paid him 
by Tho : Bennett W m . Stede and Tho : Brickenden did at the request of 
Mathew Bennett & Michaell Bennett and Joseph Colston testified &c. 
-Grant bargayne sell and confirme to the said Thomas Bennet W m Stede 

u 2 



284 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

and Thomas Brickenden their heires and assignes for ever All that 
the Mannor of Costow with the rights &c. cum pertinenciis in com* 
"Wilts' and all houses outhouses &c. and comons in Costow and Wroughton 
in corn' Wilts' To hold to the said Thomas Bennett W m . Stede and 
Thomas Brickenden their heires and assignes for ever To the only proper 
use and behoofe of the said Thomas Bennett W m . Stede and Thomas 
Brickenden their heirs and assignes for ever with a clause of warranty 
against the s d Geo : (sic) Gregory and his heires and other proper cove- 
nants. 

(82) 
20 Ap 11 1650. The particular account and agreement of D r Bennett 
M'- Mathew Bennet and M>- Colston. 

(83) 
30 11 ' Sept' 1658. By Deed Indented William Stede of Harrietshain 
in the County of Kent D r - of Lawes (reciteing therein that whereas 
Mathew Bennett of Harlington in the county of Middx' cler' Michael 
Benet of Sudbury in the county of Northampton cler' Joseph Colston of 
London, gent' and Thomas Gregory son and heire of Francis Gregory 
late of Greys Inne Esq 1 " deceased by their deeds inrolled bearing date 
the ll ,h day of Dec r - 1640 for the consideracions therein expressed did 
grant bargayne sell and confirme unto Thomas Bennett of S' Benetts 
Paul's wharfe D*- of Lawes to the s d . W ra . Stede and Tho : Brickenden 
the younger and their heires and assignes for ever All that the Mannor 
Farme or Grainge of Costow with all messuages &c. cum pertinenciis and 
all the estate of the s d . Tho : Gregory To hold to the said Tho : Bennett 
W m . Stede and Tho : Brickenden their heires and assignes for ever And 
further reciteing that the said Brickenden was dead by means whereof 
the right title and interest to the premisses was vested in the said Thomas 
Bennett and William Stede the survivors and their heires, in and by 
which said Deed Poll (sic.) the said W m . Stede in performance of the trust 
in him reposed by the said Tho : Bennett upon the purchase of the 
premisses as aforesaid and other consideracions Did for him and his 
heires and assignes for ever remise release and quitt claym unto the s d . 
Tho : Bennett his heires and assignes for ever All and Singular his 
right title &c. of in and to the said mannor and premisses. 

Studley Grange. 
The purchase of apparently about one-ninth of the Grange of 
Studley, for economic convenience, part of such lands lying inter- 
spersed with his own, by Dr. Benet, is not illustrated in the 
" abstract." To this we hope to recur. The documents which 
immediately follow concern the redemption by the respective 
purchasers of the Grange, in their proper proportions, of a rent 
charged upon it : — 



The Society's MSS. Qwidhampton. 285 

(84) 
24 Sept r 1650. By Indenture between Thomas Cooke W m Bosvile 
John Sparrow and about 20 otherTrustees appointed by an Act of Parliam' 
made for sale of the Fee Farme Rents belonging to the Commonwealth 
•of England formerly payable to the Crown, Dutchey of Cornwall orLan- 
■castre or any of them And also by virtue of another Act of Parliament 
to explain the former and all tenths, rents reserved &c. mencioned in the 
said Act (excepting Pencions as in the said Act is excepted) which by 
the said Acts are vested and settled in the said Trustees and their heires, 
of the one part, and Henry Kemp on the other part The said Trustees in 
pursuance of the said several Acts and in execucion of the trusts thereby 
•committed to them And in consideracion of 60 li which Tho : Andrews 
and John Dethick trustees appointed to receive the same had certified 
was paid by the said Henry Kemp Did grant bargain remise release 
and confirme unto the said Henry Kemp his heires andassignes for ever 
All that yearly rent sallary or stipend of 6 U 13 s 4 d payable out of Studley 
Grainge in com' Wilts' sometime parcell of the possessions of the then 
late Monastry of Stanley which in the particular is mencioned to come 
to the hands of King Edw d the 6th upon the Dissolution of the Colledges 
&c. And all the interest which the Trustees had to the said yearly rent 
of 6 U 13 s 4 a To hold unto the said Henry Kempe his heires and 
•assignes To the only use of the said Henry Kemp his heires and assignes 
for ever. 

(85) 
27 Nov. 1651. Mr. Kemps Eeceipt for 6 1! - 8 s . 4 d . 

(86) 
3 d May, 1652 By Indenture 5 tile . Between Henry Kemp of the first 
part Tho : Bennett D r - of Lawes of the 2 d . part W m . York sen r - and 
Charles York of the 3 d . part W m . York Jun" - - of the 4 th part and John 
Wells of the 5 th part Beciteing the Indenture of the 24th Sept. 1650 And 
that Henry Kemp was a person intrusted to purchase the yearly sallary 
of 6 1 '. 13'. 4 d . as well on the part of himself as of the said Thomas Bennett 
William York sen r . Charles York William York jun r - and John Wells 
amongst whom the Grange of Studley is divided and who are seized of 
severall partes of the said Grange to them and their respective heires 
The Indenture witnessed that the said Henry Kemp in pursuance 
of the trust and in consideration of 5 H 6 s . 8 d . paid him by Thomas 
Bennett and of 20". by York sen', and Charles York and 14". 18 s . p d . by 
W m - Yorke jun'- and 20". 00 s . 8 d . paid by the hands of Jn°. Wells being 
their proportion of the s d . 60 u and other charges said Henry Kemp had 
been at in procureing the purchase and passing the conveyance thereof 
Did remise release and for ever quifct clayme unto the said Tho : 
Bennett W m York sen'- Charles York W m . York Junr- and John Wells 
the said yearly rent sallary or stipend of 6 H . 13 s . 4 d ., and all his 
interest therein and it was agreed that the said yearly rent of 6". 13". 4 d . 
should from thenceforth [be] extinguished. 



286 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

QuiDHAMPTON, COSTOWE, &C. 

(87) 

29 th June, 1659. By Indenture Tripartite Between Thomas Bennett 
the elder of Salthrop in the county of Wilts D r - of Laws Francis Gregory 
and Roger Gillingham of the first part John Smith Esq*- Henry Smith 
Merchant and Thomas Smith the young 1 '- mere 1 of the 2 d p'. and Thomas 
Bennet the younger Gent' son and heire apparent of the said 
Thomas Bennet the elder and Martha Smith spinster (one of the 
daughters of the said John Smith) of the 3 d . p'. therein Reciteing a 
lease for a year dated the day before the date thereof made between the 
said Tho : Bennett the Elder Francis Gregory and Roger Gillingham of 
the one p' and the s d John Smith of the other part whereby the s a Thomas 
Bennett the elder in cons' 5 s did graunt bargayne & sell unto the s d . John 
Smith 

All that the Mannor Lordship & Farme of Quidhampton in or near 
the parish of Wroughton cum pertin And all those 3 severall fields of 
arrable land and pasture called the Overfields and the Croft which were 
some time parcell of the Capitall Messuage and farme of Can Court in the 
parish of Lydyard Tregose in com' Wilts And all barns &c. And all that 
Mannor Farme and Grange of Costowe cum pertin' And all that Toft 
scituate in Costowe called Cokharris alias Quintins cum pertin And all 
that Messuage or Tenement and one farthing of land cum pertin scituat 
in Torbryan in com' Devon All that parcell of Burton land on the Tor 
cum pertin' then late in the possession of Elian r and John Eaton cont' 

20 acres All that Messuage or Tenem' and one farthing cum pertin' at 
Poole and one parcell of land and meadow adjoining to Pool Mill cont' 

21 acres lying in Torbryan aforesaid reputed parcell of the Mannor of 
Torbryan And all rents herriots &c. All those severall parcells of arrable 
lands in the severall feilds called Roundhill Salthropfeild and Spring- 
furlong in Wroughton aforesaid cum pertin' formerly parcell of the 
Mannor or Farme of Studley in corn' Wilts And all messuages cottages 
&c. And all other the Mannors &c. of the said Thomas Bennett the 
elder scituate in Costow Wroughton Lydiard Tregose and Torbryan 
aforesaid or else where in the said County of Wilts (sic) and all and 
singular their rights members and appurtenances And further reciteing 
that the s d . Francis Gregory and Roger Gillingham in consideracion of 
5 s . to them paid by the said John Smith Did with the consent and ap- 
pointment of the said Tho : Bennett the elder Grant bargaine and sell 
unto the said John Smith [a rent of 87 1 . 18 s . l d . out of the manor of 
Somerford, co. Southampton, rent called " Larder Silver," &c. tithes of 
of fishing and " clotheing" in Shalford and tithes of hay in Ogbeare and 
Avon, fishing near the sea shore " in Cleverton bounds and lode with 
with a nett called Ramshorne," &c. &c. all apparently in co. Southampton} 

Which said Indenture Witnesseth that for and in consideration 
of a Marriage then intended between the said Tho : Bennett the younger 
and Martha Smith and of 2000 1 ' a marriage porcion with the said Martha 
by the said John Smith to the s d . Thomas Bennett the elder paid [&c. to 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 287 

secure 1501. annuity out of lands &c. in Wilts and Devon to Thomas, the 
younger, during father's life, payable quarterly at dwelling house of his 
said father situate in Salthrop, and to Martha, after her husband's 
death in recompence of dower an annuity of 1521 payable quarterly at 
" Capitall Mansion house of Quidhampton " ; and as to the manor, farm 
and Grange of Costow subject to the said annuities (the toft called 
Cockharris excepted) to the use of Thomas Bennett the elder for life, 
with rem. to Thomas the younger in tail, with rem. to use of Mary 
Bennett daughter of the said Thomas the elder in tail, with rem. to use 
of Matthew Bennett, brother of the said Thomas the elder in tail, with 
rem. to use of the said Thomas Bennett (sic) his heires and assigns for 
ever. 

And as to the manor, lordship and farm of Quidhampton, the messuage 
there, fields called Overfeilds and Croft, lands &c. in Torbryan] "and the 
aforesaid severall parcells of meadow in Broad feild and New Close " 
(not previously mentioned, however, in this abstract) " and the lands 
lying in the severall feilds called Roundhill Salthropfeild Little Feild and 
Springfurlong aforesaid heretofore parcell of theManor Farme andGrange 
of Studley " [and other the premises whereof no use is before limited 
to the use of Thomas Bennett the elder for life, with rem. to Thomas the 
younger for the terme of 100 years if he so long live, &c. with remainder 
to the use of his issue male by the said Martha, with rem. to John Trott 
the elder of Ash, co. Southampton, esq. and John Mompesson of North 
Tidworth, co. Wilts, gent, in case Thomas die leaving Martha enceint 
with a son, with rem. to the use of the said Thomas, the son, Mary 
Bennett and Mathew Bennett successively in tail, with rem. to the 
right heirs of Thomas, the younger &c, &e. There is a memorandum 
endorsed " that in case (of rates and taxes imposed by any authority 
whatsoever) the said taxes in any kind shall exceed the present rate of 
thirty five thousand by the month," the excess shall be deducted from 
the said annuity of 1521. &c] 

(88). 

10 Feb r >' 1684 [1684-5] Articles of Agreement Between Henry 
Gregory clerk of the one part and Thomas Benett of the other part 
Reciteing that Thomas Bennett was to receive a moiety of the personall 
estate of Mathew Bennett clerk which came to the hands of Francis 
Gregory as executor of the said Mathew Bennett And Takeing notice 
that Francis Gregory dyed before any account stated between Francis 
Gregory and Thomas Bennett haveing before his death made his will 
and the said Henry Gregory executor And since the death of the said 
Francis Gregory the said Henry Gregory and Thomas Bennett evened 
accounts The said Henry Gregory agreed and by Indenture of that date 
did grant and assigne to the said Thomas Bennett his heires and assignes 
the summe of forty poundes eighteen shillings payable yearly out of the 
Hereditary Revenue of Excise and agreed to pay the said Thomas 
Gregory a moyety of all such moneys as should be recovered on any 



288 The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

securities in the schedule annext to the Articles The Articles wit- 
nessed That the said Henry Gregory agreed at the joynt costs of him 
and the s d Thomas Bennett to prosecute the persons bound in the said 
securities their heires execut' 8 and Adm' s as they should joyntly think 
fitt And that Henry Gregory should not discharge or discontinue any 
such suite or the moneys due thereon without the consent of Thomas 
Bennett And would pay him a moyety of the moneys recovered deduct- 
ing half the charges And in consideracion of the premisses and of the 
said ass* Thomas Bennett released to the said Henry Gregory all clayme 
to the estate of Mathew Bennett or on account of the executorshipp 
other than on ace 1 of securities in the schedule annext with a covenant 
from Tho : Bennett that he would pay a moyety of the charges of the 
suites and a moyety of the annuall summ of 40" 18 s which was in arrear 
at Christmas then last. 

(89) 
7 June, 1706. Lease for a year Between Thomas Bennett of 
Salthrop in the county of Wilts Esq/ of the one part and Arthur Morgan 
of the Middle Temple London Gent' of the other part. 

(90) 
8 th of June, 1706. Belease. Indenture Quadrupartite Between 

the said Thomas Bennett on the first part the Hono b,c John Smith Esq r . 
Executor of Thomas Smith who survived Henry Smith brother of the 
said Tho : Smith on the 2 d . part the said Arthur Morgan and Thomas 
Cromwell of the Inner Temple London, Gent' of the 3 d . part and Thomas 
Bichmond alias Webb Esq r . and Serf, at Law of the 4 th part It is 
witnessed that the sayd Thomas Bennett for the barring docking and 
destroying all estates tayle and remainders thereupon expectant of and 
in the Mannors or Lordshippes Farmes Bents Lands Tenements, &c. 
therein mencioned and for settling assureing and conveying the same 
To the use of him the s d . Thomas Bennett his heires and assignes And 
in consideracion of 10 s . to the s d . Thomas Bennett and John Smith paid 
by the said Arthur Morgan and Thomas Cromwell The said Thomas 
Bennett and John Smith granted bargayned sold aliened enfeoffed and 
confirmed unto the said Arthur Morgan and Thomas Cromwell (in their 
actuall possession then being by virtue of the aforesaid bargayne and sale, 
&c.) All and singular the aforesaid Mannors Lordshipps Lands Tene- 
ments fee-farme rents hereditaments and premisses To hold unto the 
said Arthur Morgan and Thomas Cromwell their heires and assignes for 
ever To the intent that they may become and be perfect tenants of the 
free hold of all and singular the said premisses That two or more Common 
Becovery or Becoveryes with double vouchers may be had and suffered 
thereof &c. To the use and behoofe of the said Thomas Bennett his 
heires and assignes for ever. 

(91) 

Trinity Terrne 1706 Exemplification of Recovery. In Trinity 
Terme 1706 in the 5 Ul year of the reign of the late Queene Anne (No. 



The Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 289 

Koll 202) Thomas Bennett accordingly suffers the recovery of the Mannors 
of Quidhampton and Costow and Fee farme Eent aforesaid cum perti- 
nenciis. Which said recovery is entered upon the Roll in Foley's Office. 

Broad Hinton. 

(92) 
March 11th 1709 [1709-10] By Indenture Between the said Thomas 
Bennett of the one part and John Glanville of Broadhinton in the county 
of Wilts Esq r . of the other part It is witnessed that the said Tho : 
Bennett for securing unto the said John Glanville his exc rs . &c. the summe 
of 2700 1 '. with Interest at 5 U per cent' per ann' But subject and lyable 
in the first place to the trusts in a certain Indenture [of] even date with 
the said Indenture made between the said John Glanville of the one part 
And the said Thomas Bennett of the other part Which said summe of 
2700 11 . is the remainder of 3728 1 '. 11 s . l d . and Interest thereof at 5 a . per 
eent' per ann' computed from the 12 th Nov r . then last past unto the date 
thereof Which said suimn of 3728 u . 11 s . l d . is the consideration money 
mencioned in certaine Articles of Agreement Indented made between 
the said John Glanville of the one part And the said Thomas Bennett of 
the other part for the purchase by him the said Thomas Bennett of the 
Feesimple of the Mannors or Lordshipps of Broadhinton and other the 
premisses therein mencioned The which said summe of 3728 1 '. 11 s . l d . 
<[ which] with interest for the same at the rate aforesaid from the said 
12 th of Nov r . to the day before the date of the said Indenture amounted 
to 3790 u . 13 s . 9 d . is the consideracion money mencioned in certaine In- 
dentures of Lease and Release, The Lease bearing date the 8th and 
Release the 10 th of this instant March and made between the said John 
Glanville of the one part and the said Thomas Bennett of the other part 
And in consideracion of the summe of 2700". and also of 5 s . the said 
Thomas Bennett granted bargained sold &c. unto the said John Glanville 
his exec is . &c. All the aforesaid Mannor of Costowe cum pertin' And 
also that the Capital Messuage or Tenem 1 . called Salthrop Farme Lands 
Tenements cum pertin &c. thereto belonging (except as therein excepted) 
To hold the said Mannor of Costowe cum pertin' for the terme of 1000 
years And the said Salthrop Farme cum pertin' (except as aforesaid) 
for the residue of a terme of 21 years to the said Thomas Bennett granted 
by an Indenture of Lease dated the 24th of June 1703 from the Governors 
of the Charterhouse then to come Subject to the Covenants &c. in the 
s d . Indent r . of Lease on the Lessees part to be performed Vnder a 
Provisoe to be void on payment of the summe of 2767". 10 s on the 
12 th of Sept' then following by the said Thomas Bennett to the said John 
Glanville at the place therein mencioned. 

(93) 
12 Decemb r . 1713 By Endorsement on the backside of the s d . 
Mortgage the said John Glanville then acknowledges to have received of 
the said Thomas Bennett 2025". which with the 200 w . and 500 11 . part of 






290 The, Society's MSS. Quidhampton. 

the principall sumtn of 2700 1 ' within mencioned formerly to be by him 
received at severall times makes the full of the within mencioned summe 
of 2700" and all interest due for the same to the date hereof In con- 
sideracion whereof and of 5 s to him paid by Charles Tooker Did by 
the direccion of the s d . Tho : Benett sell and assigne the said mortgaged 
premisses and the residue of the terme of 1000 years and all his right 
&c. To hold to the said Cha : Tooker his Exo rs . &e. for the remainder 
thereof Vpon Trust that the s d terme and estate may not be amerged 
or destroyed but may attend upon and be subject unto such estate and 
estates uses &c. as mencioned of and concerning the said mortgaged 
premisses in and by one Indenture Quadrupartite dat' the 17 th of Sept' 
1712 made between the said Thomas Bennett by the name of Thomas 
Bennett of Salthrop in the county of Wilts Esq r . of the first the Hon'" e 
Dame Jane Wharton of Mansf eild Woodhouse in the county of Nottingham 
widow and relict of the Hon Me S r . Thomas Wharton K'. of the Bath 
dec' 1 , and Eliz : Wharton spinster one of the daughters of the s d S r . 
Thomas Wharton by the said Dame Jane of the 2 d . part the Hon We 
Kobert Price one of the Barons of the Excheq r and Edward Ernley Esq r . 
of the 3 d . part and Edw d . Kyder Esq. and John Nicholas Esq r . of the 
4 th part And to the further trust that that the residue of the said estate 
and interest of 1000 years may be kept on foot to protect the freehold 
and inheritance of the said mortgaged premisses from all mean estates 
and incumbrances whatsoever. 



The only other documents described in the "abstract" are 
concerned with the purchase, 4th March, 1652-3, by Thomas 
Benett, Dr. of Laws, and John Weeks, gent., of a rent charge of 
871. 18.s. Id., issuing out of the manor of Somerford, or Summer- 
ford, co. Southampton, his moiety whereof John Weeks,- 8th Feb., 
1658-9, released to Benet Benet and son, entering into bond 
9th Feb. following, to pay Weeks a moiety thereof for term of bis 
life. 



The Society also possesses a few other documents concerned 
with or derived from the family of Benet, thus there is :— 

(94) 
An Act (printed) for confirming an agreement made between Thomas 
Benet and Philip Saltmarsh Esquires for a partition of several Estates 
in the Counties of Nottingham and Dorset. 

The Act recites the settlement made by Inden 9 . of Lease and Release, 
22 and 23 July, 1706, before the marriage of the said Thomas Benet, of 



The Society's MSS. Quiclhampton. 291 

Salthrope, co. Wilts, esq. with Mary daughter and coheir of William 
Molynes of Sherfield super Lodon, co. Southampton, esq. deceased ; and 
that she had since died, leaving issue only two daughters Mary Benet 
and Martha Benet, both infants; also the settlement 21 Oct. 1704 prior 
to the marriage of Fhilip Saltmarsh and Anne Molynes, the other sister 
and coheir, &c. 

No. 134. 

(95) 

Indenture 3 March, 6 Geo. II. 1732 [1732-3] between Thomas Benet 
of Salthrop, co. Wilts esq. of the one part and William Northey, of 
Compton Bassett, co. Wilts, esq. and William Hawkins, of the Close 
of New Sarum, co. Wilts, Esq., of the other part. In conson. love and 
affection to Elizabeth Benet, his now wife, and that by inden. quad- 
partite, of even date, between Edward Ernie of Brimslade, co. Wilts, 
esq. of first, himself of second, himself and the said Elizabeth his wife 
of third and the said Northey and Hawkins of fourth part, the said 
Elizabeth had avoided, frustrated and annulled the use and trust touching 
her jointure in one inden. therein first recited, and in conson. 5 8 . paid 
him by Northey and 5 s . by Hawkins, the said Thomas Benet releases to 
Northey and Hopkins, in their actual possession by bargayne and sale 
to them by him made by inden. of previous day's date, &c. and to their 
heirs " All those Fee Farm rents issuing .... and payable out of 
and for some estate or estates in Norton Bavant Cherill Mill Studly 
Grange and Salthrop Farm," co. Wilts, " amounting in the whole to the 
value of thirteen pounds eight shillings and two pence or thereabouts 
which he the said Tho s . Benet lately purchased of Will 111 . Levinze Esq r .," 
to hold, with all deeds and evidences belonging to Northey and Hawkins 
and their heirs for ever, in trust to convey same to said Elizabeth Benet 
or such person as she shall appoint and her heirs in fee simple 
and to such uses as shee shall appoint. Executed by " Tho : Benet " seal, 
crest of Benet " : " W m Northey," seal, Northey arms ; " W m Hawkins," 
seal, on a base wavy (?) a lion passant, in chief three roundels, and 
on a canton three .... 

Endorsed. Signed &c. by Benet in presence of John Lord, W m Jacobs, 
Stephen Smith, by Northey in presence of Anthony Serlanty (?) John 
Holbussh (?) Richard Ingle, and by Hawkins in the presence of Martha 
Benet, Elisa D'Oyly, J. Clarke. 

No. 128. 

(96) 

Letters of administration of the "goods of Elizabeth Benet formerly 
Wharton late of Salthorpe, co. Wilts deceased granted by Thomas 
archbishop of Canterbury to Thomas Benet the lawfull husband 

London, 22 Aug. 1749. 10 s . stamp. 

(Mem".) "Entred in Am: Soc? Office Register Book 15 th Sept'. 
1749. J. P." 

No. 133. 



292 



MALMESBUBY ELECTION PETITION, 1807. 
By E. 0. P. Bouverie, F.S.A. 

[Read at the Wilton Meeting of the Society, July \%th, 1906.] 

This paper is on the Malmesbury Election Petition of 1807, 
consequent on a polling which took place on 31st October, 1806. 
It is founded on a pamphlet entitled " Petition of C. H. Bouverie, 
Esq., against the Malmesbury Election Return, 1807," which con- 
tains the proceedings of the Committee of the House of Commons 
on February 26th, 27th, 28th, and March 2nd, 1807, and was 
printed at Salisbury by J. Easton, High Street, 1807. It may be 
of interest here to note that Malmesbury was one of sixteen 
boroughs within the area of Wiltshire which each returned two 
members to Parliament, the others being Great Bedwyn, *Calne, 
*Chippenham, Cricklade, *Devizes,Downton, Heytesbury, Hindon, 
Ludgershall, *Marlborough, *New Sarum, Old Sarum, *Westbury, 
*Wilton, and Wootton Bassett. Of these Malmesbury and those 
marked with an asterisk preserved separate representation with at 
least one member down to the last Beform Bill, while Cricklade was 
enlarged by the addition of the voters in adjacent places. It will 
thus be seen that at the date in question Wiltshire with its county 
members had thirty-four parliamentary representatives. I will 
not say before this audience that our county was over-represented, 
but about j- of the House of Commons was returned from this 
area against about -ft at the present time. What they represented 
is another matter, and doubtless a subject of interest, but it is 
with the intricacies of the representation of Malmesbury alone 
that we are concerned upon this occasion. 

Mr. Bouverie, the petitioner, was a nephew of the then Lord 
Radnor, who was the owner of considerable property in the neigh- 
bourhood of Malmesbury, and it was probably due to this 
connexion that he put himself forward as candidate for this place. 
He was at the time of the election a man of twenty-four, and from 



Malmesbury Election Petition, 1807. 293 

what little I know of him I doubt if he was keenly interested in 
political matters. He was not a witness before the Committee. 
The Committee sat for four days, and heard a number of witnesses 
on behalf of the petitioner, but no evidence was called on the part 
of the sitting members, and at the close of counsel's speech on 
their behalf the Committee dismissed the petition, but held that 
it was not frivolous or vexatious. 

The hearing began before fifteen M.P.'s on 27th February, 1807,. 
Mr. Thomas Stanley in the chair. The petition alleged that 
at the last general election there were six candidates proposed to* 
the electors, and charges the two who were returned, Messrs. 
Ladbrook and Colbourn, with bribery, corruption, and treating. It 
appears that the right of election in this place was vested in one 
alderman and twelve burgesses (thirteen in all), and counsel even 
at that date was compelled to admit that this seems a rather 
small number for so important a task ; on this occasion the two 
members were returned by the votes of five people — no other of 
the thirteen qualified exercising their right. There were, therefore,, 
six gentlemen soliciting the votes of five people. It is somewhat 
remarkable that throughout the lengthy proceedings it nowhere 
appears of what political complexion were any of these six gentle- 
men. We may surmise that the candidates returned were Tories,, 
inasmuch as Mr. Estcourt, who, you will hear really returned the 
members, was probably a Tory, but whether they were supporters 
of Lord Grenville, who was then the Prime Minister, or what 
views they held of the late Mr. Pitt, who had recently died, or 
whether, indeed, anybody concerned in this election paid the 
slightest attention to any public question, cannot be gathered, or 
indeed inferred, from anything that is reported in the course of 
these proceedings. This may seem to you remarkable, but you 
must remember, that we are politically in the Stone Age, and in 
boroughs of this description the mandates of which we now hear 
so much, were given, not as you might suppose by the thirteen 
persons who had the power of returning a member, but by the 
person who had taken efficient and sufficient means to secure that 
that power should be exercised in a certain way. 



294 Malmesbury Election Petition, 1807. 

Now these thirteen electors (the alderman and capital burgesses) 
were elected for life, the capital burgesses being chosen by them 
from the twenty-four assistants, and the assistants out of thirty-one 
landholders of about an acre of land by inheritance. There was also 
a high steward of the borough, elected by the corporation ; an 
office filled at the time of this election by Mr. Edmund Estcourt, 
of the well-known old Wiltshire family which is said to have been 
settled in the neighbourhood for many centuries. Mr. Spackman, 
in common with other electors, who was the alderman and re- 
turning officer on the present occasion, admitted that he had never 
seen the members who were returned, either before or since the 
election, and did not know if he had ever seen them in his life, and 
that the only knowledge he had of them was that they were 
mentioned to him by Colonel Kingscote, who lived a few miles 
from Malmesbury, two or three days before the election. 

It further appeared that on the day of the election Mr. Estcourt, 
Colonel Kingscote, and the ten electors who were — as it is said — in 
Mr. Estcourt's interest, paraded with a band to the polling place, 
that the electors were then called over by the deputy high steward, 
the alderman first, and then the youngest burgess, and after five 
of the electors had voted for Ladbrook and Colbourn, Messrs. 
Bouverie and Panton, who alone of the candidates were present, 
said they would not put the electors to further trouble, and would 
retire from the contest. Thus concluded a not very solemn farce. 
These are the facts appearing about the actual election which 
have an engaging simplicity about them, when we consider how 
complicated is the machinery at the present day to enable us to 
be represented in parliament. But I must now direct your at- 
tention to the story leading up to this election, of which the 
petitioner unsuccessfully complained. The controversy raged round 
the acts of the high steward, who seems to have held the borough in 
his pocket. It appears that down to shortly before his death 
in 180-4 this post was held by a man called Wilkins, and 
the main part of the case put forward by the petitioner 
before the committee consisted of his behaviour during many 
years as high steward of the borough. It appeared that he 



By E. 0. P. Bouverie, F.S.A. 295 

was in the habit of paying the voters an annuity of £30 a year 
■each, taking from them a bond to the effect that they would accept 
his directions in any matter affecting the borough. For nearly 
thirty years by this machinery he returned the members, who were 
practically unknown to the electors ; but about the year 1803 he 
appears to have fallen into arrear with his payments,and he thought 
it desirable to resign, suggesting that Mr. Estcourt should succeed 
him. It may here be mentioned that he left £500 to the burgesses 
by his will, except to one who had " disobliged " him, so we may 
hope that, in spite of the arrears, his ashes rested in peace so far 
as Malmesbury was concerned. It appears that Lord Peterborough 
made enquiries, and took some steps with a view to becoming high 
steward, but the choice fell on Mr. Estcourt, who had recently 
taken a prominent part in upholding successfully the right of the 
capital burgesses to vote in exclusion of the freeholders at large 
and who, said two of the witnesses, was strongly recommended as 
Mr. Wilkins' successor because he was not only prepared to do all 
that Mr. Wilkins did, but even more, because he was ready to 
distribute among the electors the surplus that he received, if 
any, from marketing the seats. I presume the committee rejected 
1 or whittled down, as they were asked to do by counsel, the statement 
I of this witness in rejecting the petition, or they may have adopted 
his other suggestion that even if they suspected corruption they 
had no right to act on mere suspicion, and that in any event there 
was no act of corruption brought home to the sitting members, and 
there was no evidence to show agency of Mr. Estcourt on their 
behalf, but in those days the committee seldom interrupted save 
in the most dignified manner, and at the close of the proceedings 
merely announced that the members were duly elected. Now 
Mr. Estcourt was never called as a witness, and I cannot but think 
that the petitioner proved sufficient to call upon him for his account 
•of the circumstances, and I think it probable that a majority of 
the committee were in sympathy with the political views of Messrs. 
Ladbrookand Colbourn, and were unwilling to disturb the general 
electoral status quo. 

I will give you a few extracts from the evidence showing the 
attitude of the voter in those days, and in this place. 



296 Mcdmesbury Election Petition, 1807. 

Thomas Brook, a farmer living near the borough, had a conversa- 
tion with Spackman, the alderman, who said "Mr. Estcourt was a 
very good kind of a gentlemen to them and would do everything for 
them that he could in the borough,he would make as much money as 
he could for them, and after making as much as he could, he would 
pay his expenses, and would separate the rest among the burgesses, 
and would not get a penny by them, and that he (Spackman) could 
go to Tetbury bank at any time and draw money in Mr. Estcourt's 
name whatever he wanted!!" Mind you, this witness was not 
cross-examined for the sitting members. 

Margaret Broadway, a servant to one Newth, a capital burgess, 
said Mr. Estcourt asked her master for his vote for the hi^h 
stewardship and told him he was to come in on the same terms as 
Mr. Wilkins did, and also said the last year that Mr. Wilkins lived 
he brought Newth £30, and she took him the money about Trinity 
time (when it was alleged the annuities under the bonds were 
paid) . She also knew Newth was bound in a bond because she was 
called in that there might be no dispute about the bond after his 
death (he being ill at the time). This witness was not cross- 
examined. 

Bishop, a burgess, corroborated as to Mr. Estcourt having the 
borough on the same terms as Mr. "Wilkins. He had never seen 
any candidate for whom he had voted, "Wilkins gave him a card I 
with the names (produced), and he voted for the names (this, of 
course, referred to a previous election). He admitted being j>aid 
£30 a year by "Wilkins. Neither was this witness cross-examined. 

Ponting, a burgess, in answer to questions, said " He (Mr. E.) was I 
to bring forward the gentlemen; they had no particular reason, I 
one gentleman was as good as another to we." Q. " Did you say I 
just now that they had thro wed up the business to Squire Estcourt?" 
A. " Yes, we gave it in his power to bring forward the members ; I 
one gentleman to me is as good as another, we are never biassed I 
nor bribed to elect one in more than another : we never received I 
nothing nor want nothing in regard to that." "Which I suppose U 
the committee accepted. 

Tanner said " The gentlemen [i.e., members] for a good many 



By E. 0. P. Bouverie, F.S.A. 297 

years have not been at the borough. Mr. Wilkins said it made 
no odds. I voted for them when Wilkins named them." 

Sargeant said he " did remember of several voting against the 
wishes of the high steward." Declines to say whether he had an 
annuity or was bound in a bond to the high steward. When asked if 
he had received anything from Mr. Estcourt : A. " I never knew Mr. 
Estcourt give me anything in his life. Mr. Estcourt named 
the members." Q. " Did you go to court without knowing whom 
you were to vote for ? " A. " Lord bless ye ! In Mr. Wilkins' time 
we voted for the persons he put up ? " Q. " Were you to do the same 
with respect to the persons Mr. Estcourt put up ?" A. "Yes, we 
thought it our duty to do so." Q. " Did Colonel Kingscote mention 
Col bourn's name to you ? " A. " Yes and I said if it was agreeable 
to Mr. Estcourt I never should be against it." 

W. Jefferies applied to Hanks, a burgess, and said he hoped 
they would show their consequence and choose members who were 
present at being chosen. Hanks said " I have nothing to do with 
that, that is as my master likes." I said " Who do you mean ? 
It is of no consequence to you whether they are Foxites, Pittites, 
or what, it is a matter of indifference. If Mr. Wilkins consents 
you choose them." He said "Yes." I said "I thought they had 

■ conferred great honour on Mr. Wilkins and that they had made 
him very rich, and that now they had an opportunity of making 
themselves very rich if they knew their consequence." 

Bishop was recalled to speak to the existence of bonds in several 
cases of the burgesses. Q. "What were these bonds for ? " A. 
" For choosing Wilkins high steward, and choosing in members 
such as Wilkins should bring." 

I merely cite this evidence, not to show that the committee 
arrived at a wrong decision, but to show you the kind of story 
which probably would have to be told and would be told, without 

I any undue amount of blushing, in the case of many boroughs 

i which then had the'privilege of returning members to parliament. 

> Now admittedly Mr. Estcourt returned the members, and I 
i cannot but think that the voters who had the right of returning 
j the members were very unlikely to have chosen Mr. Estcourt to 

VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. X 



298 Malmesbury Election Petition, 1807. 

succeed Mr. Wilkins unless they were pretty certain to get the 
same or better terms out of Mr. Estcourt. Mr. Estcourt sat with 
Mr. Wilkins when the latter was high steward, he was recommended 
to them by Mr. Wilkins as his successor, he subsequent to his 
election as high steward took a house in Malmesbury, he gave a 
dinner two days before the election at which he recommended the 
two men who were subsequently returned as members, and I confess 
I think that there is more than a suspicion that the electors of 
Malmesbury did not suffer pecuniarily from the change of high 
stewards. But in justice to the memory of a high-minded gentleman, 
such as both sides were at pains to admit that he was, I would 
ask you to realise that at this date there was nothing derogatory 
to such a character as he bore in being concerned with traffic of 
this nature. The committee treated the whole matter with dignity 
and reticence, and no doubt that which seems to us open to 
criticism was a matter of common occurrence a hundred years ago. 
You must remember, too,that more tban sixty years elapsed before 
this jurisdiction was transferred to the judges from the committees, 
on account of the notorious partiality of election committees, 
and such committees were not likely to be less partial when 
probably a certain number of their members owed their seats 
to devices somewhat similar to those alleged to have been used in 
the case of Malmesbury. 

You may, perhaps, ask what was the motive of these proceedings, 
and how they came to be published at private expense in pamphlet 
form, and I think I have a reasonable theory to account for both. 
Now the petition was presented by Mr. Bouverie alone, his colleague 
had nothing to do with it, nor did Mr. Bouverie claim the seat, as 
his counsel urged at some length on the committee, and my surmise 
is that the candidature, the petition, and the subsequent publication 
of the proceedings were instigated by his cousin, Lord Folkestone, 
and carried through simply to expose the system of corruption in 
this borough. Lord Folkestone, who was then the Radical member 
for New Sarum, afterwards became well known in the House of 
Commons as a vigorous opponent of privilege in all its forms, and 
afterwards as almost the only Badical member of the House oft 



By E. 0. P. Bouveric, F.S.A. 299 

Lords. He was an ardent supporter of the Reform Bill, how 
ardent may be judged from the following incident. On becoming 
Lord Radnor in 1828 the patronage of the borough of Downton 
fell into his hands. He returned the members for it on the distinct 
pledge, that if and when the question was raised, they would vote 
for its disfranchisement. I therefore think it likely that thus early 
in his political career he was getting a case together for reform by 
showing to the public the nature of our electoral system. The 
pamphlet was published in Salisbury, for which he was member, 
with which place Charles Bouverie had little connection, nor, from 
what I know of the latter, do I think it likely that having failed 
in his petition he would concern himself further about the matter. 
In whatever manner the publication may have come about, the 
record shows the distance which we have travelled politically 
since 1806. No doubt the inducements to vote for a particular 
person at the date in question seemed adequate to the voters, and 
lit is not material to consider whether they would be adequate now. 
"We cannot say that Mr. Wilkins's pension scheme has its 
•counterpart at the present day, and under the ballot no bond 
could secure that he who claimed the pledges of the electors should 
not be " disobliged." The point that it is difficult to realise is 
that those who were concerned in bargains of this description 
suffered nothing in their personal reputation. Familiarity had 
bred a confident feeling that such transactions were necessary and 
proper. Let us hope that our views have altered for the better 
and that it is not merely the impossibility of such occurrences that 
has changed our ideas of necessity and propriety. 



x 2 



300 



THE DISCOVERY OF A CHAMBEK IN THE LONG 
BARROW AT LANHILL, NEAR CHIPPENHAM. 

By Maud E. Cunnington. 

In June last (1909) a fine sepulchral chamber was discovered in 
the stone-built long barrow at Lanhill, near Chippenham, Wilts. 

This once fine barrow was partially excavated by Dr. Thurnam 
in 1855, when he discovered what he believed to be the remains 
of two cists, both of which seem to have been previously opened 
and ruined. 1 Until this summer the barrow seems to have been 
little, if at all, disturbed since that date, and the description of its 
appearance then applies to it equally well to-day. "At present 
the mound," Dr. Thurnam wrote, " has the appearance of several 
irregular hillocks, in part grown over with thorns and briars, re- 
sembling somewhat the site of an old quarry." The barrow has, 
indeed, from time to time been used as a quarry, and it is a matter 
of difficulty to recognise the remnants of a long barrow in the few 
more or less detached hillocks that now remain. 

Some stone being needed to repair the floor of the cowyards 
of Lanhill Farm, the barrow was attacked this summer at a hitherto 
undisturbed section on the south side of the mound. 

After a considerable quantity of stone had been removed two 
large upright stones were uncovered which proved to be the portals { 
of a sepulchral chamber. The workmen moved the easternmost of 
these two uprights, and were proceeding to clear out the chamber, 
which had become filled with loose stone as a consequence of the 
collapse of the roof. They soon recognised that they were 
digging out human bones with the stone, ' and the work was i 
stopped, but unfortunately not before three skulls that seem to j 

have been in an excellent state of preservation were smashed, and I 

___^__ , . l 

1 Wilts Arch. Mag., vol. iii., p. 67. This barrow is sometimes called | 
" Hubba's Low." 




Lanhill Long Barrow, Chippenham. 
Entrance to chamber as excavated 1909. 



The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lanhill. 301 

the greater part of them no doubt carted away to mend the cow- 
yards. 1 

The chamber proved to be a large and very interesting example 
of its kind. It is situate on the south side of the mound, 10ft. 
within the outer edge, and 84ft. from the western end, the total 
length of the barrow, as well as it can now be judged, being 196ft. 

Six irregularly-sbaped stones form the walls of the chamber ; 
Nos. 5 and 6 on the plan are narrow in proportion to their height, 
and while they form the southern wall of the chamber, they may, 
perhaps, be regarded equally well as portals, or pillar stones, on 
either side of the entrance. 




Plan of Chamber. 

At the highest point of the remaining original roof the chamber 
is 5ft. high ; its greatest length inside the portals 8ft., or at N.N. 

'The Kev. C. N. Wyld, Eector of Grittleton, hearing of the discovery, 
brought it to the notice of the Wilts Archaeological Society, and with the 
kind approval of Sir Audley Neeld, Mr. B. H. Cunnington, of Devizes, was 
privileged to open out the chamber. 



"302 The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lanhill. 

8£f t. ; its width just inside the portals at M.M. 4|ft. ; its greatest 
width at o.o. 5ft. 2in. ; the width between the portal stones 2ft. 4in. ; 
the stones themselves are from 5in. to 1ft. in thickness, 

The greater part of the roof was found to have collapsed into 
the chamber, filling it with loose stones, but about 3ft. of roof over 
the back part of the chamber was intact, and beneath this and 
above the fallen-in rubble there still remained an open space. 

The part of the original roof still remaining is formed of thin 
slabs of stone of no great size. On top of the large stones forming 
the walls of the chamber is a carefully-laid dry walling, the upper 
layers of which are laid with increasingly large stones towards the 
top, so placed as to overlap each other, and thus to form a slightly 
domed roof, somewhat after the fashion of stone-built Irish beehive 
huts. 1 

As no stone large enough to span the width of the chamber was 
found among the debris, it seems tbat this device for utilising 
smaller pieces of stone must have been attempted over the whole 
space to be roofed in. But unless this overlapping dry stonework 
was carried up at a fairly steep pitch it could not have formed a 
very strong covering. Possibly timbers were thrown across onj 
top of the walls to support the roof over the front part of the 
chamber. Either the decay of such timbers, or the inherent weak- 
ness of the roofing would account for its collapse. 

In the angles between the large stones of the wall, where from 
the irregularity in their shape they do not meet, the spaces are 
filled up with dry walling. In the north-eastern corner between 
the stones Nos. 3 and 4, is a particularly neat and pretty little 
piece of work, executed with evident care and precision, and shown 
in the accompanying photograph. 2 

1 This form of roofing is not uncommon in long barrows. It occurred at 
Stony Littleton, Archceologia, XIX., p. 46; at Uley, Arch. Journal, XI., 
319, 326 ; and at Upper Swell, Greenwell's " Barrows," No. ccxxxl., p. 522, 
&C. It has been called the " horizontal arch." 

The photograph of the roof here given shows the original overlapping 
stonework and the large slab supported by iron bars, with which the roof has 
recently been completed. 

2 Gaps and irregularities in the walls were found to have been made good 
in a similar manner elsewhere; notably at Uley, Arch. Journ., XI., 317, 
and at West Kennet, Archaologia, XXXVIII., 410. 






'.# : v-. 






■' 


, 1 






o — 
<32 ■« 



c I 




OS ^ 

« £ 
< 

O Z 

Z o 

o „ 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 303 

One of the workmen present when the uprights at the entrance 
were first uncovered stated that a thin slab of stone was found 
resting lengthwise against the outside of the two uprights ; from 
his description it also appears that the stones immediately 
outside the entrance were larger than elsewhere. Possibly these 
formed a dry walling closing up the chamber. 

A course of regularly-laid stones, forming a containing wall, such 
as is often found in stone-built barrows was well shown in the 
section into the mound made by the stone diggers. Where exposed 
this wall was 3ft. high, and 4ft. within the barrow, measured from 
the present outside edge of the mound. Possibly this wall had 
curved inwards to form an entry to the chamber, but evidence as to 
this was destroyed by the stone diggers. 

In his paper on long barrows in Archceologia, vol. XLIL, Dr. 
Thurnam classified chambered long barrows into three types : — [A] 
those with chambers opening into a central gallery; [B], those 
with no central gallery, but with separate chambers, all with 
passages opening externally; and [C], those with cists in place of 
chambers. In this third class Dr. Thurnam placed the barrow at 
Lanhill. The recently discovered construction is, nevertheless, 
more corectly described as a chamber than as a cist, for, as Dr. 
Thurnam himself has said, cists are built up on all four sides and 
not intended to be entered except from the top, whereas chambers 
open on one side by a recognisable entrance. Cists, also, generally 
speaking, are smaller than true chambers. The four cists in the 
neighbouring barrow at Littleton Drew were not much more than 
2ft. in height, 1 nor were the cists previously discovered at Lanhill. 
There were both cists and chambers in the long barrow at 
Avening, Glos. 

Bones that could not have belonged to fewer than eleven in- 
dividuals were found in the chamber. The majority of these were 
on, or in, the red clayey soil of the floor, but one skull was found 
among the rubble filling-in, some 3 or 4 inches above the level of 
the floor. This skull was much crushed but otherwise complete, 
and proved to be the only one capable of restoration. The lower 
1 Archceologia, XLIIL, 218. 



304 The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lanhill. 

jaw was imperfect, and lay some 3 inches in front of the facial 
bones. The skull was upside-down, resting on its crown among 
the rubble. 

Among the bones cleared out by the stone diggers when they 
first broke into the chamber, and which, therefore must have been 
just inside the entrance, are parts of three adult skulls, two well- 
preserved femurs, four nearly perfect pelvic bones, the only two 
sacra, and the only sternum found. It seems therefore probable 
that two or three skeletons, or parts of skeletons, were placed just 
inside the entrance at some time later than the disposal of the 
majority of the remains, and it is possible that had these not been 
disturbed by the workmen one or more fairly perfect skeletons 
would have been found there. 

In that part of the chamber undisturbed by the workmen it 
was impossible to trace out the position of any individual skeleton, 
the bones being all scattered promiscuously on the floor, and rarely 
even were two found in their natural relative positions. 

The limb bones, with only one or two exceptions, were broken, 
sometimes into as many as five or six pieces, the hollows of the 
bones being filled with red soil, showing that the breakages were 
of no recent date. In more than one instance parts of the same 
bone, fitting each other, were found in different parts of the 
chamber. 

It is notable that in addition to the three skulls broken by the 
stone diggers, the only one found in good condition, referred to 
above, was also in the outer half of the chamber. Only fragments 
of two other skulls were found, one of an adult, and one of a young 
child, making a total of six, while there were nine lower jaws, 
and from the number of limb bones it is evident that the remains 
of not fewer than eleven individuals were represented in all. 

Unless the scattered condition of the bones be taken as such, 
there is no reason to think that the chamber had ever been opened 
since it was closed for the last time by its original owners, but it 
is nevertheless possible that at some early date an entry had been 
made through the roof. Even so, it is doubtful if such an in- 
trusion would account altogether satisfactorily for the conditions 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 305 

within. The collapse of the roof would no doubt account for the 
breakage of the longer bones, but not for their complete dis- 
arrangement. 

The human remains in a trench forming the primary interment 
in a long barrow at Upper Swell, Glos., 1 seem to have been found 
in much the same condition as those in the chamber at Lanhill. 
One complete skeleleton was found, but the other bones were 
broken, and indiscriminately mixed up, some on the floor and some 
in the rubble above the floor ; and bones apparently belonging to 
the same individual were found at distances from each other. 
There were fourteen lower jaws to only ten skulls, and more limb 
bones than could have belonged to so few as ten individuals. 
Professor Eolleston, from whose account these details are taken, 
took these facts to disprove in this case the " ossuary theory," and 
thought them altogether in favour of the " successive interment 
theory." He thought the moving of the older bones to make room 
for the later burials would account for their disordered condition, 
and intermixture with the rubble. It is difficult, however, to see 
how this theory would account for the absence of many of the 
principal bones, especially of the skulls. 2 

The Pottery. 
Some fragments of pottery which appear all to have belonged 
to one vessel were found by the men digging stone when they first 
broke into the chamber. The ware is a blackish brown in colour 
on the outside of the vessel, shading up to a bright brick-red on the 
inner side. It is roughly modelled by hand and devoid of orna- 
ment ; the rim is straight with a slight and very irregular beading. 
The paste is of a good quality and freely mixed with crushed fossil 
shells. In clearing out the floor of the chamber a few more 
fragments of identical pottery were found, embedded in the clay. 
In addition to these, three small fragments of a different ware were 
found. This latter is of much the same texture as the first, but on 

1 British Barrows, CCXXXIL, p. 533. 
2 In unchambered long barrows the skeletons are often found to be incom- 
plete and huddled promiscuously together. At Norton Bavant there were 
too many skulls in proportion to the limb bones. Archceologia, XLII., p. 184. 



306 The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lanhill. 

the outside it is a light brown in colour, shading to buff, and the 
surface is smooth, as though it had been tooled. The colour of the 
inner side and of the paste itself is a brownish black. 

It is interesting that in four instances Dr. Thurnam mentions 
that pottery found in a long barrow was mixed with crushed shells, 
and not, as is more usual in Bronze Age ware, with pounded flint 
or quartz. It occurred in the chambered barrows of Eodmarton 
and Nether Swell, in Glos., and in the unchambered barrows at Nor- 
ton Bavant and Tinhead, in Wilts. No doubt locality would to a 
great extent determine the materials used in the manufacture of the 
wares, and fossil shells may have been easily obtained at Lanhill 
and in the three first-mentioned cases, but at Tinhead, on Salisbury 
Plain, chalk or flint would seem more likely to be used. 

Two small flint flakes, a small piece of burnt flint, a nodule of 
iron stone, some pebbles and gravel flints, such as may be found 
locally on the surface, were the only other objects found. These 
were all on the floor of the barrow, either in the chamber or just 
outside it. 

Other Excavations. 

The edges of two large stones were noticed above the turf near 
the eastern end of the mound. It was not at the time recognised 
that these were part of the cist opened by Dr. Thurnam in 1855 ; 
his description not being very definite. But on excavating at 
this spot it was made clear that this was the eastern cist 
opened by him, in which he found a few scattered fragments 
of human bones. The northern of the two parallel stones 
described by him seems to have been broken, and the larger part 
of it put back into the cist leaning up against the western side 
of the stone which he described as fomiing the cross bar of the 
letter " H." Nothing was found except one finger bone among 
the stones filling in the cist. This leaning stone has now (1909) 
been taken and used as a covering or roofing stone for the better 
preservation of the southern chamber. 

Dr. Thurnam seems to have excavated at four different places 
in the barrow. But as he made no plan or exact measurement it 




c „ 



I a 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 



307 



is not now possible to locate them. In his third excavation it 
seems that he may have narrowly missed finding the southern 
chamber. The small disturbed cist that he found on the north 
side of the mound was apparently to the north or north-east of 
the southern chamber. These two cists found by Dr. Thurnam 
and the chamber found in 1909 are the only recorded burial places- 
found in the barrow at Lanhill, but it is quite possible that other 
cists, and even chambers, have been destroyed by stone diggers. 

It is a pleasure to be able to add that Sir Audley Neeld has 
taken steps to preserve and safeguard the chamber from destruction. 
A large stone has been put over the chamber where the roof had 
fallen in, and an iron framework adjusted to counteract the inward 
thrust of the walls. Earth has been banked up against the exposed 
sections of the mound, as otherwise rain and frost would bring 
down the loose stones of which it is built and iron railings have 
been put round that part of the barrow containing the chamber. 

The following list of the principal bones found is given in case 
it may some day be of use for purposes of comparison. 

The stone diggers are probably responsible for some of the 
missing bones, but not for many. 



Femora 


3 


complete 


5 


incomplete 


total 8 


Tibue 


6 


j? 


8 




)> 


„ 14 


Humeri 


5 






14 




>> 


„ 19 


Radii 


2 


; 




13 




yj 


„ 15 


Ulnae 


2 


j 




11 




>> 


„ 13 


Fibulae 


3 


j 




14 




?? 


„ 17 


Clavicles 


6 


, 










„ 6 


Sacra 


2 


, 










2 


Sternum 


1 


, 










„ 1 


Lower jaws 


9 


„ 


(all 


more 


or 


less imperfect) 


Skulls 


1 


3omp' 


ete 


5 i 


ncomplete 


total 6 



The complete bones are inclusive of those that it was found 
possible to mend. These bones are exclusive of those of the very 
young child. 



308 The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lanhill. 



EEPOET ON THE HUMAN BONES FOUND IN THE 
LANHILL LONG BAEKOW. 



Femora : — 

Length. Shaft, 

1 E' 456 32 X 29 

2 L« 457 32 X 27 



By Dr. J. Beddoe, F.E.S. 



Stature by Do. by 
Circ. Manouvrier. Pearson. 



97 
92 



16631 ..,,„-. Almost surely a pair. Both, 



1665) 



3 abt. 400 21 x 20 68 1505 f. 



especially the left one, some- 
what bowed and pilastered. 
Oblique measures 454 and 457. 
Stature by Beddoe 1699 mm 6 . 
=66-9 inches. 
Young, probably female, wants 
epiphyses. Discolored. 



4 


26 x 24 


86 




Proximal portion. Discolored. 


5 


29 x 29 


92 




Ditto. ditto. Eobust. 


Tibia .— 










1 L« 377 


35 X 23 


94 1668 


1682 


Malleolus included, and spine ex- 
cluded. Discolored. 


1 E l 355 


31-5x22 


83 1624 






S B< 342 


33 X 22 


af . fl592m. 
Bi> \1557f. 


} 


Discolored. 


4 L l 361 


30 X 23 


80 1636 


1644 


Slightly bowed. 


5 E' 344 


32 X 17 


78 




Shaft ; malleolus gone, bowed. 


6 242 


22 X 16 


63 




Child ; no epiphyses. 


Humeri :- 










1 L l 322 




70 1634 


1638 




2 L" 320 




R7 (1629 m 
b< 11604 f. 


i. 




3 E< 302 




77 /1560 m. 
" \1562f. 




4 E l 305 




72 1 1575 m. 1 


Slender, probably female. Dis- 


5 E' 205 




73 11562 f 


• I 


colored, twisted. 


Others, fragmentary 


, circumferences 86 


, 75, 62, 59, 58, & 45 (child). Ten 


persons indicated, beside the young 


child. 




Radii : — 










1 E« 243 




49 1666 


1654 




2 E l 243 




47 1666 


1654 




Ulna : — 










1 E' 259 


11 X 9 


50 1650 






2 L' 270 


13 x 9 


54 1690 






Fibulae : — 










1 E' 345 




50 1578 




Crooked. 


2 L l 358 




50 1626 




Straight. 


3 E' 358 




55 1626 




Ditto. 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 



30i> 



Clavicles : — 




4 R< 152 


42 


5 L< 148 


46 


L 142 


39 


L 139 


36 


R 107 


35 


R 118 


42 



Child. 

Discolored, imperfect, straight. 
? female. 






Pelves : — Two nearly perfect, seemingly female. 



Mandibles : — 



Chin Height. 
| 33 
! 32 



34? 



33 



32 



Length. 
103 
92 

94 

85 

86 



29 — 



26 

36 
22 



75 



Appertaining to skull. Adult. Teeth moderately worn. 
Robust, in two fragments, but nearly complete. Much 

discolored, teeth moderately worn. 
In one piece, but imperfect. Discolored. Teeth little 

worn. Chin bifid. 
Imperfect. More rounded in vertical aspect. Discolored. 

Chin not bifid. 
Left side perfect, ramus 52, chin angular. Probably aged 

woman ; no teeth remain, alveoli partly absorbed. 
Very slightly discolored, chin rounded, teeth very much 

worn. Probably aged man, left postremal alveolus 

absorbed. 
Very young, not discolored, one molar remaining is un- 
worn, last molars not fully erupted. 
Massive fragment, chin bifid. Not discolored. 
Ramus 53 (left, perfect). Much discolored. Four 

bicuspids, no true molars. A child, between 1st and 

2nd dentition. 



There is no sign of caries in any one of the teeth, 
chin is in most cases to be narrow and angular. 



The tendency of the 



Skull. 



Lengths — glab-max., 204; metopo-inial, 195; glab-inial, 190; ophryo- 
max., 201 ; facial (estimated), 65 and about 111. 

Breadths— frontal, min., 95? ; Stephanie, 110?; max., 140. 

Circumf. horiz., 558 ; sagittal arc, 145 ? frontal, 290, 375, 423 + ? 
Transverse arc. (Pearson's), imperfect, probably 158 or 159 X 2 = 318 ; 
(Busk's) 163 X 2 = 326 ? 

Ear-height — by Pearson, 120 or more ; by Busk, 125 ; Basibregmatic 
height probably about 138. 

Nasal breadth 22, length ? Leptorhine. • Orbital, 39, 34 ? Breadth-index, 
68-6. 



310 The Discovery of a Chamber in the Long Barrow at Lanhill. 

The skull has been carefully restored, but some of the figures must of 
course be somewhat doubtful. The vertical , aspect is dolichokephal and 
somewhat pentagonal, the occiput prominent but rounded, the glabella and 
ridges only moderately developed, the upper frontal region full. The skull is 
large and capacious, but not thick, coarse, or heavy. The capacity, estimated 
by Welcker's tables, might vary between 1628 and 1750 ; by Pearson's, from 
1571 to 1737 ; by Manouvrier's, perhaps 1587 ; Pelletier's, 1722. My plan 
gives 1822, which is probably too great, owing to the enormous horizontal 
circumference and sagittal length. But my estimate would be over 1700, 
considerably more than the average capacity of modern English crania. The 
head was that of the chief of the family or tribe, and deservedly so. I suppose 
that Femora 1 and 2, Tibia 1, Fibulae 2 and 3, Ulna 2, and Clavicles 4 and 5 
may have belonged to him. These are all free from the kind of peppergrain 
discoloration which affects so many of these bones, and which I cannot 
explain with certainty. On the whole, these remains are typically neolithic. 1 

1 By kind permission of Sir Audley Neeld the fragments of pottery, the 
skull, and a few of the more perfect limb bones, have been placed in the 
Museum at Devizes. The rest of the bones have been re-interred in the 
barrow. 



311 



NOTES ON BARROWS ON KING'S PLAY DOWN, 
HEDDINGTON. 1 

By Maud E. Cunnington. 

The Long Barrow. 

King's Play Down rises in a steep ascent from the old Bath and 
London road to the edge of the chalk escarpment overlooking the 
village of Heddington. About half-way up the slope, and not in 
a very prominent or conspicuous position, is a long, low, rather 
flat barrow. 2 

Before excavation the mound measured 101ft. in length ; 47ft. 
In width at a point one third of its length from the east end, and 
34ft in width at two-thirds of its length from the same end. The 
mound lies east-north-east and west-south-west. It increases in 
height for the first 23ft. from the east end, and then gradually 
tapers off towards the west. 

The whole of this mound was thrown over with the exception 
K>f a shallow fringe on the northern side, a trench 24ft. wide being 
first cut down the entire length of the mound and the sides then 
thrown over into it. 

Before excavation two saucer-like depressions were noticed on 
the south side of the mound, one 23ft, and the other 36ft. from the 
east end. A skeleton was discovered lying crouched on its left 
side immediately beneath the spot where the first depression had 
been noticed. The skeleton lay a little to the south of the central 
line of the barrow, 23ft. from the east end and 22in. below the 
surface. Thus, though not in any way in a central position, dis- 
regarding the local depression, it was at that point where the 

1 The three barrows here described were opened by Mr. B. H. Cunnington 
and myself in August, 1907, by kind permission of Captain Spicer, of Spye 
Park and of his tenant, Mr. Peak-Garland. 

2 Described by the Bev. A. C. Smith as " An oblong low barrow, running 
to great length ; grass: not opened." — Antiq. of North Wiltshire, Section 
lV.,A.vii., c. p. 62. 



312 Notes on Barrows on King's Play Do'ivn, Heddingtun. 

mound attained its greatest height. The skeleton lay east and 
west, with the head towards the east and facing the south. The 
hody must have been much contracted, the whole space occupied 
by the bones being only 3ft. 2in x 18in. The left elbow was bent 
and the hand clenched in front of the face ; the right arm was 
stretched out, the hand resting behind the knees, which were bent 
and drawn up towards the face. 

The body had been laid on the turf without any excavation, and 
no relic of any description seems to have been placed with it. 
Four flint flakes were found among the bones, but their presence 
may have been quite accidental, and although the soil under and 
round the skeleton for some feet was sifted nothing was found in it. 

For an irregular space of from 3ft. to 5ft. round about the 
skeleton the soil appeared to be composed of decayed turf and 
mould and was quite different from the material of the rest of the 
barrow. It seems not unlikely that the first step towards building 
the barrow had been made by piling up round the body the turf 
and mould which must have been taken from the ditch before the 
chalk of which the mound mainly consists could have been got at. 
A few specks of what may have been either decayed wood or 
charcoal were noticed in this mould, but not enough to suggest 
that there had been a fire on the spot. 

It has been said that there were two depressions or slight hollows 
on the surface of the mound, and an interment having been found 
under the first' it was hoped and expected that another would be 
found under the second. No trace, however, could be found of a 
second interment, nor did the mound show any signs of having 
been disturbed at that or any other place. 

The dark seam of the old surface turf was plainly visible under 
the whole area of the mound. The ground was picked over down 
to the undisturbed chalk in search of any cist, but with the ex- 
ception of two holes and a trench nothing was found. These two 
holes were 2ft. deep and 2ft. in diameter, one 15ft. and the other 
30ft. from the east end, and both just to the north of the central 
line of the mound. The trench was 2ft. wide and 1ft. deep in the 
chalk ; it ran from side to side beneath the mound in a slightly 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 313 

oblique direction from north-east to south-west, ending abruptly 
on both sides at the outer edges of the mound, and 9ft. within its 
eastern end. Both the holes and the trench were filled with the 
same rubbly chalk of which the barrow was built, but in the first 
hole mixed with this there was some dark earth and a fragment 
of deer horn. 1 

The mound was built entirely of chalk rubble, apparently taken 
from the wide shallow ditch which extended along both sides of 
the mound, but which, as is usual in long barrows, was not carried 
round the ends. The ground having been thus lowered on either 
side the mound appeared higher than it really was, the greatest 
depth from the surface to the old turf line being only 26in. 

Ten fragments of coarse pottery and fourteen flint flakes were 
found scattered through the mound, four of the flakes being among 
the bones. 

The barrow seems to be undoubtedly a true long barrow of the 
simple unchambered class. The shape and orientation of the 
mound, the interment at the east end at the spot where the mound 
was highest, the absence of accompanying grave goods, the presence 
of a shallow ditch on the sides of the mound, the size of the bones 
and the pronounced character of the skull are all typical of 
Neolithic barrows ; while the crouched position of the skeleton 
and the mysterious holes under the mound seem to be equally 
characteristic of Neolithic and Bronze Age barrows. 2 



The Saxon B arrow. 

This is a small very low round barrow, not noticed by the Bev. 

A. C. Smith, or marked on the Ordnance Maps. It is situated 25 



1 For holes under barrows see Archceologia, XLIL, p. 181, and British 
Barrows, p. 9. 

5 " The primary interments in the (unchambered long) barrows may be 
classed under two heads : . . . skeletons of one, or at the most two bodies 
separately interred, or . . . many bodies promiscuously piled together," 
the latter being much more usual than the former. Archceologia, XLIL,. 
p. 184. For crouched position in long and round barrows see Ibid, p. 189. 

VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. Y 



314 Notes on Barrows on King's Play Down, Heddington. 

yards south-west of the bowl-shaped barrow on the summit of the 
hill. 1 

The mound is 24ft. in diameter and 1ft. in height. Under the 
■centre a large grave was found, 6ft. 7in. deep, 7Jft. long, 4ft. wide 
at the top, and 2|f t. wide at the bottom. The grave contained the 
remarkably well-preserved skeleton of a man extended at full 
length on its back, with feet to the east and head to the west, the 
left arm bent across the body, the right arm extended by the right 
side. 

There were no relics or remains of any kind with the skeleton, 
with the exception of thirty-six iron nails which were found em- 
bedded in the chalk round it in such a manner as to make it 
practically certain that they had been used in a wooden 
coffin. All sign or trace of the wood had, however, disappeared, 
except a few shreds actually adhering to the nails themselves. 

From the manner of interment and from the character of the 
skull it is probable that this barrow is of Saxon origin. 

Barrow No. III. 

This mound is 175 yards south of the bowl-shaped barrow on 
the summit of the hill. 2 It is close to the box hedge and close to 
the western side of the ancient bank and ditch, which here run 
up the hill. 

The mound is not noticed by the Eev. A. C. Smith, nor is it 
marked on the Ordnance Maps. The mound is not quite circular, 
being 22ft. in diameter from north to south, 18ft. from east to 
west, and 2 feet high in the centre. The whole mound was turned 
over but no trace of any interment could be found, and no grave 
or cist, although these were carefully searched for. A few small 
sherds of coarse pottery and one or two pieces of pottery that may 
be Romano-British were found in the surface mould. It is possible 
that the mound is not really a barrow. 



1 See Rev. A. C. Smith's Map, Antiquities of the North Wiltshire Downs 
Section IV., A. vii., a. p. 62. 

2 Eev. A. C. Smith's Map, p. 62, Section IV., A. vii., a. 



By Maud E. Cunnington. 



315 



KEPORT ON SKULLS AND LONG BONES FEOM BARROWS 
ON KING'S PLAY DOWN, HEDDINGTON. 

By J. Beddoe, M.D., F.R.S. 



Table of Measurements : — 






Lengths : — 


Saxon. 


Neolithic. 


Glabello max 


193 


213 


Fronto-inial 


186 


204 


Glabello-inial 


182 


202 


Ophryo-max 


192 


208 


Facial 


130 


122 


Upper Facial 


77 


75 


JBreadths : — 






Frontal min. 


98 


99 


Stephanie 


120 


112? 


Zygomatic 


134 


128 


Auricular 


115 


108 


Maximum 


143 


133 


Mastoid 


134 


? 


Asterial 


107 


? 


Bigonial 


94 


97? 


Arcs. : — 






Circumference, horizontal 


547 


565 


Frontal 


135 


146 


To Lambda 


265 


300? 


To Inion 


350 


384 


Total Sagittal 


403 


428 


Transverse to centre of m. 


326 


320 


Length of Foramen 


38 


? 


Breadth of ditto 


28 


? 


Basis cranii 


99 


? 


Basio-alveolar length 


97 


? 


Nasal measures • 


54, 24 


53, 23 


Orbital „ 


37, 34 


38, 33 ? 


Palatal ,, 


58, 40 


? 


Mandible — Chin height 


37 


35 


Length 


92 


93 


Ramus 


68 


63 


Height, basio-bregmatic 


139 


145? 


Earheight, approximate 


122 


120? 


Length of left Femur, maximum 


488 


436 


„ left Humerus, maximurr 


346 




Cranial Indices — Breadth 


74-1 


63-4? 


Height 


72-02 


68-07 ? 


Nasal Indices 


44-4 


43-4? 


Orbital „ 


92 


87? 

Y 2 



316 Notes on Barrows on King's Play Down, Heddington. 

The Saxon skull is quite perfect, even to the styloid processes. It is that 
of a vigorous man apparently in the prime of life, and is very fine in both 
size and proportions. In the norma verticalis it is rather elliptic than oval- 
in the lateralis it presents a slight postparietal flattening, but is generally 
well filled, rounded, and symmetrical. The face is long, the nasal bones- 
arched, the forehead domed, the brows only moderately prominent. 

The cranial capacity is much above the average. The following are the- 
estimates thereof by several processes : — 

Welcher, D. 1677 cubic cent* Pelletier 1613 

Beddoe 1672 Welcker, C. 1586 

Pearson, G. F. 1639 Pearson & Lee, \icco 

Manouvrier (Flower) 1612 or 1624 mean of 3 j 

Here the peripheral schemes all give results exceeding those of the 
diametral ones —the truth probably lies near the upper end of the scale — say 
about 1650 ; for the skull, being well rounded, must be capacious in propor- 
tion to its diameter ; and its- weight (about 28 ounces including the mandible)' 
is not excessive. 

For the determination of the stature I have a left femur and a left 
humerus. The former yields, by my process [(3 F. + 330 mm.)=stature] a 
height of 1794 mm. = 70*5 inches, the latter one of 1769 • = 697 inches. 
Pearson's process for the two bones gives 1745 mm. = 68 - 7 inches. Man., 
ouvrier's 1734 = 68 - 27. Thurnam would have made the stature 70"4 inches, 
and Humphry 7016. L 

The preservation of the thyroid cartilege, due to infiltration with lime 
from the chalk, is a markworthy circumstance. 

Taking in conjunction the following facts : — 1, Burial in, or rather under, 
a barrow apparently raised expressly for the purpose ; 2, Absence of any 
accompanying objects ; 3, Orientation (head to west) ; I presume that this 
interment dates from about the middle of the 7th century. The skull-type 
is what I have been accustomed to call " high Saxon, and it is frequent 
among us at the present day. 

The other skull is as typically Neolithic as the former is Saxon or English, 
in narrowness it may even be said to transcend the type. It has unfortunately 
been smashed into about fifty pieces, and, though it has been well recon- 
structed, one cannot, of course, put much trust in the measurements. We 
may, however, be certain that it was very large and very long, extremely 
narrow, much higher than it was broad, very regular in profile-contour, and 
in the norma verticalis flatsided, and square anteriorly. It was probably 
opisthognathous, and certainly leptorrhine. The forehead was somewhat 
receding and the brows prominent : the lower occipital was very short. It 
belonged to an old man, but the teeth, smaller than those of the Saxon, and 
quite sound, were not very much ground down. 

It is rather thin and light, weighing 22£ ounces with the mandible. Its 
capacity was certainly very large, probably greater than that of its Saxon 

1 It is interesting that measurements of the skeleton taken before the bones 
were disturbed, from the crown of the skull to the heel bone, made 5ft. 9jiu. 
— M.E.C. 



By Maud E. Cunniiigton. 



317 



companion and age-long neighbour, but by reason of its manifold fracture 
and reconstruction, it is not possible to give any estimate of much value. 
Mme Pelletier would probably put the capacity somewhere about 1715 c. cm. ; 
Pearson's and Lee's plans anywhere from 1570 to 1744 ; Manouvrier (Flower) 
about 1680 ; my own computation would come out higher than any of these 
figures (1877), but I do not doubt that it is excessive. However, the 
dimensions are so great as to transcend the limits of any of Walcker's tables. 
Though this old chieftain had so large a head, his stature was low, and not 
above the Neolithic average. The estimates of Thurnam, of myself, of Karl 
Pearson, and of Manouvrier, in this instance all agree within half-an-inch, 
the average of the four being 1635 cm 8 , or 64*35 inches. This femur is 
strongly contrasted with the Saxon one, not only in length but in robustness. 
Their respective circumferences are 85 and 97 millimeters, and the Neolithic 
■one is somewhat pilastered, or its figure would be less than 85. - 



1 By kind permission of Captain Spicer the two skulls and the limb bones 
have been placed in the Museum at Devizes. 



318 



NOTES ON THE PARISH CHURCH AND SAXON 
CHURCH, BRADFORD-ON-AVON. 

By A. W. N. Bukdee, F.S.A. 
[Bead at the Bradford-on-Avon Meeting of the Society, 1909]. 

The Parish Church was built in the first half of the twelfth 
century, and originally consisted of a nave and chancel. Some 
think there was a Norman west tower, and that the staircase 
turret, which has been very much restored, belonged to it, as from 
its position, access to the tower can only be obtained from the small 
platform corbelled out into the nave, just under the roof. There 
are windows of the Norman period in nave and chancel, and 
Norman buttresses to both, and from the proportions of the Church 
it is evident that Bradford at that early time was a place of some 
importance. 

The next century — the thirteenth, or Early English period — is- 
not represented in the Church, unless the figures under the 
canopied tombs in the chancel can be ascribed to this period, but 
the canopies are later. 

In the succeeding century — the fourteenth — Bradford was, we 
know, rising in prosperity, and — as we might expect — the Church 
was not forgotten, for we find the chancel was lengthened by about 
one-third of its length. 

In the fifteenth century, as we generally find in town Churches, 
a considerable enlargement took place. The town, owing to the 
woollen trade, a most important industry in the country, was in- 
creasing in prosperity, and amongst the families who left their 
mark upon the Church were the Horton and Hall families. A 
north aisle was added to the nave and its history is the history of 
not a few of the aisles to our English parish Churches, viz., that 
it was originally a chantry chapel or chapels. 

Reginald Halle, by a deed in the year 1420 provided for the 
endowment of a chaplain in the Church of the Holy Trinity of 



Notes on the Parish and Saxon Churches, Bradford-on-Avon. 319 

Bradford to celebrate mass at the altar of St. Nicholas for his 
soul and for the soul of his mother ; it is not clear whether he built 
the chantry, but it belongs to this period. Its position is said to 
be the western portion of the north aisle. 

I state here what I find recorded, but I am not sure that there 
is not some confusion as to the work of Hall : the chapel on the 
south side was built by this family, but it appears of a later date 
than 1420, or at any rate was altered at a later date. Canon 
Jones, in his history, speaks of two chantries, but there was 
a third, that of Thomas Allerton, during the incumbency of 
William Ffurbrier, and if Allerton's chantry was in the north 
aisle as well as Horton's, the south chapel would be that of Hall. 

A little later in this century Thomas Horton, a wealthy clothier 
of Bradford, built the eastern portion of this north aisle, endowing 
it as his chantry, and the cross wall between the two was removed 
— thus we have the aisle. He prepared his monument during his 
lifetime, for on his brass now fixed against the wall at the south- 
east corner of the aisle (originally no doubt on the floor before his 
altar), the date of his death and that of his wife is left blank. It 
is as follows : — 

" Of your charity pray for the souls of Thomas Horton and Mary his wife, 

which Thomas was some time founder of this Chantry and deceased the 

day of Anno D ni 15 and the said Mary deceased the day of 

15 On whose souls Jesu have mercy." 

He died in 1580. He seems to have been engaged largely in 
building, for he built himself a house at the east end of the Church, 
now the Abbey House, in the outbuildings of which there are 
walls and beams and fireplaces of this date. He also built a 
mansion house for the chantry priest, now incorporated in the 
house still called the Chantry, the residence of our President, Dr. 
Beddoe. The rent paid by the chantry priest was 3s. Ad. a year. 
Later on we find him building another house at Iford, where he 
died, about two miles distant, still in existence; as is also his will. 

Amongst stones now stored in the Saxon Church is part of the 
i basin of a piscina of this date, which may have been the piscina 
' of this altar, mutilated possibly when the huge slab with his brass 
i upon it was fixed against the wall in modern times. 



i 



320 Notes on the Parish and Saxon Churches, Bradford-on-Avon. 

There are also in the Saxon Church two capitals, a base, and 
some arch moulds of Transition Norman style, which I suspect 
are part of the original chancel arch of the Parish Church, the 
present one dating from the fifteenth century. 

There is an unusually long hagioscope from Horton's Chantry, 
ending under the canopied tomb against the north wall of the 
chancel. The intermediate part has been destroyed to form a 
heating chamber. 

The original nave arcade with its piece of Norman wall left, 
through which a hagioscope was pierced, was destroyed during 
last century, and the present uninteresting arches — bad copies of 
the original — erected. One of the uses of such a Society as ours 
is to keep a keen look-out and to enter the strongest protest 
against tampering with our ancient buildings. Had the Society 
come into existence a few years earlier much that has been de- 
stroyed in many Churches might have been saved. 

Canon Jones, in his History, speaks of several fragments of the 
rood screen remaining, and adds " the rood loft still remains." 
The beam supporting the rood loft and the gallery itself with its 
front remained until the middle of last century, and was used as 
a gallery ; it has been swept away. The beam was first used to 
strengthen the belfry floor, then taken down, and after lying in 
the churchyard with its original gilding and colour decorations 
still remaining, is said to have been used for firewood. Of the 
rood gallery front all that remains is part of two panels (here 
illustrated): it was sawn into pieces and distributed. The two 
panels have been cleaned of the varnish and are now fixed on the 
west wall of the nave. The figures are those of St. Ambrose and 
St. Jerome, of the end of the fifteenth or beginning of the sixteenth 
century, and are worthy of inspection. The original doorway of 
the rood staircase remains and is a specimen of axed work. In 
front of it is a case containing a bible believed to be a reprint, in 
1572, of the Bishops' Bible, published in 1568. It is thought to 
be the first English version of the bible used in this Church. Since 
its disuse its history is known, and it has during this year been 
re-purchased at an old furniture shop in the town and presented 
to the Church by the churchwardens. 




Painted Panels of the Rood Screem of the 
Parish Church, Bradford-on-Avon. 




Fragment of Recumbent Effigy, 
Paiish Church, Bradford-on-Avon. 



By A. W. N. Burder, F.S.A. 321 

The tower is late fifteenth century. There are eight bells, the 
two oldest of which are 1614 in date. 

The Church registers date from 1579. 

The Church plate includes : — 

A chalice 1564 

Chalice with cover and paten 1634 

Almsdish 1702 

Paten 1704 

Flagon 1723 

Spoon 1756 

Two chalices, two patens, and flagon 1764 

It is not known to whom the monuments under the canopies on 
the north and south of the chancel are erected. 

An illustration is given of the head and shoulders (all that now 
remains) of what has been a very beautiful recumbent effigy of 
a female of the fourteenth century. 

There is an Elizabethan brass within the altar rails with in- 
scription to Anne, wife of Gyfford Longe of the date 1601. 

The Steward monument, on the north wall of the chancel, is 
worthy of inspection, the western cherub being particularly good. 
It is of the Queen Anne period. 

In the north aisle there is an erection, supposed by some to be 
the reredos of an altar, by others to be a reliquary, by others an 
Easter sepulchre. It is of the fifteenth century. In the original 
nave arcade there was a block of Norman walling opposite this, 
pierced by a hagioscope, facing towards the chancel. 

In the churchyard, near the chancel door, is a dole table, at 
which debts were paid, as well as Church dues and tithes to the 
parish priest. 

Opposite to the Church on the north is the house of Edward 
Orpin, for many years Church clerk in the eighteenth century: 
a small building of some merit. His tomb is just inside the 
churchyard. He was a friend of Gainsborough, who painted his 
portrait, well known as " The Parish Clerk," now in the National 
Gallery, an engraving of which hangs in the vestry. 



322 Notes on the Parish and Saxon Churches, Bradford-on-Avon. 

SAXON CHUKCH— NOTES ON REPAIRS TO CHANCEL AND 
DRAINAGE IN 1908. 

The level of the ground on the north side had risen so as to bury 
the plinth. This has been lowered and the plinth again exposed 
to view. It was found that the plinth was the lowest course of 
masonry, and owing to the stony nature of the ground there was 
no foundation under it. The soil was therefore excavated in short 
lengths at a time, 2ft. 6in. deep, and the walls underpinned with 
cement concrete, projecting 15in. at the bottom beyond the face 
of the walls, tapering to 9in. projection at the top. At the lowest 
level a 3in. field drainpipe was laid to intercept the water from 
the higher ground. On the surface of the concrete foundation an 
open channel was formed in cement concrete laid to a fall to take 
the water from the rain water pipes, thus abolishing all underground 
drains near the building. 

A few bones were found under the roadway between the Saxon 
and Parish Churches. These were re-interred in the Saxon church- 
yard. Bones were also found in July, 1908, in excavating in the 
garden attached to Church House. Though a careful look-out was 
kept no moulded stone or anything of interest has been found in 
the ground round the Church during the excavations. 

On the south side, the wall of the chancel was found to go down 
about 5ft. below the present ground-level. The wall below the 
ground had been lime-whited, and at its base some coal dust re- 
mained. A shed formerly used as a coal cellar had stood here. 
There was no paving. Three new stones were put in to the wall 
below the ground-level, the wall was pinned up, grouted, and 
pointed. 

The foundations having been made secure the work of grouting 
the walls commenced, beginning at the ground-level, course by 
course. I at first thought of using a grouting machine, but coming 
to the conclusion that this was not suitable, I decided to adopt the 
slower process of injecting liquid cement grouting partly by a 
syringe, and partly by pouring it in, until the whole of the cavities 
in the wall were entirely full. Before grouting, some of the wide 



By A. W. N. Burder, F.S.A. 323 

vertical joints were raked out, and here and there a stone of modern 
date which had been inserted was removed, and the core of the 
walls raked out, and the walls thoroughly saturated with water the 
day before the grouting was done. The walls, I may explain, are 
built of large coursed stones inside and out, with no bonding 
stones, the interior of the wall being filled with a rubble core, 
which had crumbled to dust. The grouting was repeated on the 
north, south, and east walls of the chancel up to the arcading. 
At this level the walls were more unsound. At the south-east 
corner the stones had shifted 2in. to Sin. from their position. The 
corner was therefore shored, four stones on the south side were 
taken down, the perished core was removed, copper ties fin. x^in., 
about 5ft. long, were laid in the interior of the wall, cross and cross, 
hard bonding stones were built into the middle of the wall, every 
crevice was grouted with Portland cement, and the facing stones 
re-bedded. The east and north walls were similarly grouted and 
tied together with copper ties, but it was not found necessary to 
remove any stones. The Saxon builders had selected their stones 
with admirable judgment, and it was necessary to substitute only 
one new stone in the walls. 

The gable of the east wall is thinner and is built solid without 
a core. It was necessary to point this only. 

The copings throughout have been repaired and pointed, the flat 
surfaces of all string-courses and other protections have been 
covered with a weathered cement fillet. 

The walls of the chancel are now quite sound, and the foun- 
dations and those of the north porch quite secure. 



324 



NOTES ON SOME WILTSHIRE MERCHANTS' MARKS. 

By T. H. Baker. 

The Rev. J. A. Lloyd, late Vicar of Mere, 1 made a collection of 
Merchants' Marks, with the intention of writing a paper on the 
subject.but being prevented by illness, has handed over the material 
for publication in this Magazine. Although the list of those 
relating to Wiltshire is by no means exhaustive, yet it forms a 
valuable nucleus for a complete collection, containing the greater 
part of those existing in the southern part of the county. Mr. 
Lloyd says " The practice of each merchant to affix a distinguishing 
mark to his bales of goods was necessary, when people could 
neither read nor write, but they would be able to recognise a mark. 
These marks were in general use in the thirteenth, fourteenth' 
fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. They often exhibit the cross 
and banner of the Agnus Dei ; sometimes a monogram seems to be 
intended. They were formed under no fixed rules, the marks 
really depending upon the fancy of the merchant. They were 
used by the better class of shopkeepers, and not confined to 
foreign traders or owners of vessels, and they were hereditary, a 
distinguishing difference being taken by various branches of the 
family. Merchants placed their marks upon their houses and on 
shields in Churches, as in Mere, Wilts, and they are to be found 
amongst the coats of arms of those promoting the restoration of 
Churches. This is noticed in " Piers Plowman's Creed " in the 
fourteenth century: — 

Wyde wyndowes y-wrought 

Y-wryten ful thikke, 

Shynen with shapen sheldes, 

To shewen aboute, 

"With markes of Merchauntes 

Y-medeled betwene. 

Mo than twentie and two 

Twyse ynoumbbred." 

1 The Society is indebted to the Rev. J. A. Lloyd for the kind gift of the 
three blocks illustrating this paper. 



Notes on some Wiltshire Mei'chants' Marks. 325 

They are found on rings, seals, oak chests, doors, windows, and 
panels of old houses, painted on windows, and engraved on brasses. 
They were used on the Continent and by wine merchants in Oporto 
and Lisbon. 

When the younger sons of the nobility or others bearing arms 
engaged in trade, they often had on their tombs their paternal 
coat of arms as well as their merchant's mark, impaled or on 
separate shields. 

In 1459 one Robert Thompson was appointed tokener to seal 
all cloths called Norwich cloth with a lead seal or token after 
being found of correct measurement, and the woollen weavers were 
obliged to bring in a roll of the names of their craft with each 
man's token, by which the goodness of the cloth might be known 
by the mark as the measurement was by the token. Sometimes 
the Merchant Adventurers Arms, or the arms of the city company 
to which the merchant belonged are found in connection with his 
mark." 

. The accompanying plates contain Merchants' Marks, the 
majority of which are to be found on the seals attached to 
deeds belonging to the Corporation of Salisbury, but it by no means 
follows that the seal contains the mark of the person who executed 
the deed, as it is evident in many cases that it was engraved for 
his ancestors. 

The Eev. E. E. Dorling, late incumbent of Burcombe, drew to 
uniform size the whole of the marks engraved for this paper. 

A Key to the Plates. 

Unless otherwise stated these are from seals attached to docu- 
ments amongst the municipal records, Salisbury. In this list the 
persons to whom I have assigned the marks are, in many cases, 
j not the persons using the seal and executing the documents. On 
| the other hand, where the seal itself gives no evidence to the 
contrary, it is assumed that it belongs to the person using it on 
the document. This attribution, however, must not be regarded 
j as always certain. 



326 Notes on some Wiltshire Merchants' Marks. 

1. — Date 1312. Around this is inscribed sig. aedelefvz* ieoavy 1 
2.— „ 1313. Eobert de Cnowell— Mayor 1314. 
3. — n 1342. Isabella de Lavington is inscribed round this 
impressionw, hich seal is attached to a docu- 
ment of Isabella, wife of Henry de Melksham. 
Eobert de Lavington, Mayor 1319. 

Roger Fouke. 

Johis Gillingham. 

Thomas le Eyr executes this document but it 
will be observed the initials on the mark are 
I.E. 

Johis 

Reginald Tudeworth. Mayor 1297, 1306, 1310, 
1312. M.P. for Salisbury, 1306. 

Johis Surmen or Gurmen. 

Robert Rlayer. Mayor 1386-7. 

Henry Gille. Tanner. 

7 

? 

Andrew Fostebury. 

Richard Gatour, of New Sarum. Mayor 1430-1. 
M.P. 1433. 

id 1443. John Noyle, of Sarum. 

William Devenysh. Silversmith. 

John Wyse. Draper. Mayor 1460, 1461, 1470. 
M.P., 1463. 

Nicholas Edmondes. Mayor 1475. 
William Swayn. Merchant. In St. Thomas's 
Church, Salisbury, on the beams and in the 
east window of south aisle. He was mayor 
1444, 1454, and 1477. M.P., 1460. 
21. — circa 1500. Webbe. Wool merchant. On a corbel in the 
library of the Church House, Salisbury, and 
in St. Thomas' Church. 

1 The impression of this seal is very indistinct but apparently is as here 
given. It is attached (without the horizontal line at the bottom) to documents 
of Reginald de Tudeworth. 



4.— 


j> 


1345. 


5.— 


>> 


1382. 


6.— 


J5 


1382. 


7.— 


>> 


1383. 


8.— 


>> 


1383. 


9.— 


)> 


1383. 


10.— 


J> 


1387. 


11.— 


>> 


1387. 


12.— 


>> 


1392. 


13.— 


?> 


1392. 


14.— 


It 


1416. 


15.— 


)) 


1431. 


16.— 


)> 


1431a 


17.— 


)) 


1447. 


18.— 


>> 


1474. 


19.— 


J» 


1474. 


20.— 


circa 1460 



tli 








6 





7 • 



8 






3- «J 



11 






15 



12 



16 



Wiltshire Merchants' Marks. 





^ 






T!7 

21 ^* * J A 

,t-rS. *Jb». S$S i 

J*-^ vtxr W ^ 



W 



25 



26 





2 7 



28 



a 




*9 



3<> 



31 



32 



Wiltshire and other Merchants' Marks. 



By T. H. Baker. ■ 327 

William Webbe was mayor 1495, 1511, 
1513, 1522. William Webbe, his son, 1533, 
1547, 1552, and 1561. M.P. 1529, 1536, 
1547. 

John Webbe. 1560. To the latter is a 
brass in St. Thomas's Church, 1570. 
22. — Date 1508. Henry Serygge. Mayor 1508. On a mantelpiece 
in the smoking room at the Church House, 
Salisbury, formerly in an old house in the 
Fish Eow, Salisbury. 
Unknown. 
Stephen Jobson. 
Unknown, 
Thomas Eodde. 
John Coryett. Mayor 1555. 
Thomas Shipton. 
John Lott, bellfounder of the Close, Warminster 

his mark. 
John Joyce, of Salisbury. Mayor 1664. 
Edward .... Salisbury. 
38. — circa 1460. John Hall. Wool merchant. Salisbury. Im- 
paled with his arms in one of the windows 
in his hall, on the Canal. Mayor 1450, 1456. 
1464 and 1465. M.P. for Salisbury 1460, 
1461. 
39. — circa 1460. In Mere Church. Unknown. On a shield on 

the balcony in the north aisle. 
40. — Date? On a fifteenth century tomb in St. Thomas's Church, 
Salisbury, the original name and inscription 
on which has been abstracted. 
1 44. — „ ? Bishopstone Church, near Salisbury, on a slab 

in a recess probably the tomb of a benefactor. 
.48. — „ 1591. In plaster found on a wall of an upper room in 
Mr. Neesham's house, Oatmeal Eow, Salis- 
bury. 



23.— 


ti 





24— 


jj 


1526. 


25.— 


>J 


1542. 


26.— 


>9 


1542. 


27— 


» 


1555. 


28.— 


)> 


1624. 


29.— 


» 


1660. 


32.— 


» 


1674. 


53.— 


J> 


1354. 



328 Notes on some Wiltshire Merchants' Marks. 

Foreign. 
30 and 31 are from Haarlem Cathedral, on brasses. 

Other Counties, English. 

34, 35, 36. — On brasses in Hereford Cathedral. 
37.— Date 1430. William Kylands, of Manchester. 



43.— , 


, 1579. 


Hillingdon Church, Middlesex. Drew Saunders 
Devonshire. 


41.— , 


, 1550. 


St. Mary Arches, Exeter. 


42.— 




John Lane. Collumpton Church. 


45.— , 


, 1517. 


John G-reenway. In Tiverton Church. 


46.— , 


, 1570. 


At Axmouth. On a chimney. 


47— , 


, 1579. 


John Waldron. In Tiverton Church. 



I 




Wiltshire and other Merchants' Marks. 



329 



THE EXCAVATION OF THE SITE OF OLD SARUM. 

The systematic excavation of the site of Old Sarum has been 
recently undertaken by the Society of Antiquaries, with the 
cordial co-operation of the Wiltshire Archaeological Society. It will 
of necessity be a work entailing much labour and expense, and will, 
if sufficient funds are forthcoming, be continued for several years. 
The direction of the work has been placed in the hands of Lieut- 
Col. Hawley, F.S.A., and Messrs. W. H. St. John Hope, M.A., and 
Mill Stephenson, F.S.A., the three delegates appointed by the 
Society of Antiquaries, one of whom will always be present to 
superintend the actual work of excavation. It is proposed that 
the whole site, that of the Norman Castle, Cathedral, and City, as 
well as the earlier earthworks, and whatever remains may exist 
on the hill of the Saxon, Eoman, and Prehistoric periods, shall be 
scientifically and exhaustively examined. 

A Local Committee of nineteen members, representing the Dean 
and Chapter, the City of Salisbury, the Wiltshire Archaeological 
Society and the County at large, has been formed to assist the 
work and to help in the collection of funds. The Society of 
Antiquaries has issued an appeal to its Fellows, and established a 
Kesearch Fund, from which grants will be made for this and other 
! excavations. As, however, a large sum will be required annually, 
a Special Wiltshire Fund has been opened, and the Local Committee 
appeal to all who are interested in the archaeology of the county 
to support this important work. 

Subscribers are asked, if possible, to promise an annual sub- 
scription for three years, and to send in their subscriptions for the 
current year as soon as may be to the Treasurer. 

All subscribers of 10s. a year and upwards will have the right 

of free entry for themselves and their families to the excavations. 

Cheques should be sent to the Hon. Treasurer of the Fund, 

Mr. M. H. W. Devenish, Wilts and Dorset Bank, Salisbury; and 

VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXII. Z 



! 



330 



The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum. 



other correspondence addressed to Mr J. J. Hammond, Mitke 
House, Salisbury, Hon. Secretary to the Local Committee. 

The subjoined list shows the response to the appeal issued by 
the Local Committee up to the present time. It is hoped that a 
considerable number of additional subscriptions may be obtained 
before the work is resumed next year. 



LIST OF ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS AND DONATIONS. 





Subscriptions 
for 3 years. 


Donations. 




£ ■■ 


d. 


£ s- 


a. 


The Earl of Pembroke, G.C.V.O. 


5 





— 




W. Heward Bell, Esq. 


— 




10 





N. Story Maskelyne, Esq., P.E.S. 


3 3 





— 




W. Price, Esq. 


— 




10 





The Rev. E. H. Goddard 


10 





— 




The Bishop of Salisbury 


— 




5 





The Bev. C. V. Goddard 


10 





— 




J. A. Rutter, Esq. 


1 1 





— 




Miss Knowles 


— 




10 





Mrs. Knowles 


— 




10 





Miss M. A. Douglas 


1 1 





— 




Ambrose Tucker, Esq. 


10 


6 


— 




The Rev. W. H. M. Clarke 


10 





— 




J. Rose, Esq. 


10 





— 




The Rev. J. A. Lloyd, F.S.A. 


10 





— 




Miss Ewart 


1 





— 




The Rev. A. W. Stote 


10 





— 




P. Benton, Esq. 


10 





— 




The Rev. F. W. Reade 


10 





— 




The Rev. Chancellor Bernard 


— 




5 





Mrs. Carver 


1 





— 




Sir Walter Grove, Bart. 


1 





— 




E. 0. P. Bouverie, Esq. 


— 




5 





The Rev. Canon Morrice 


— 




1 





The Baron von Roemer 


1 1 





— 




Lord Avebury 


— 




2 2 





Captain E. F. Oakeley 


10 





— 




L. L. Morse, Esq., M.P. 


1 1 





— 




Charles Awdry, Esq. 


1 





— 




Edward Coward, Esq., (10/- a year paid in 










advance) 


— 




1 10 





William Stratton, Esq. 


— 




3 3 





E. P. Squarey, Esq. 


— 




5 









Carried forward ; £21 7 6 £39 5 



The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum. 



331 





Subsci'ii 


otions 










for 3 y 


ears. 


Donati( 


MIS. 




£ 8. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


Brought forward 


21 7 


6 


39 


5 





Colonel Pitt, E.E. 


1 







— 




S. Grove, Esq. 


10 







— 




Mrs. Grove 


10 







— 




C. H. De Mello, Esq. 


10 







— 




Miss A. A. M. B. Bosanquet 


10 







— 




Blair Onslow Cochrane, Esq. 


— 




1 








A. Robinson, Esq. 


— 




1 


1 





George Knowles, Esq. 


2 







— 




E.T. Fison, Esq., M.D. 


— 




1 


1 





J. Roger Rees, Esq. 


— 






10 





M. H. W. Devenish, Esq. 


— 




5 








W. Pritchard, Esq. 


— 






10 


6 


The Rev. G. R. Hadow 


1 1 







— 




Colonel Good 


10 







— 




F. Watson, Esq. 


10 


6 




— 




E. C. L. Parker, Esq. 


— 






10 





C. S. Dixon, Esq. 


— 






10 





A. R. Maiden, Esq., F.S. A. 


— 




1 


1 





Sir Charles Morrison Bell, Bart. 


— 




10 


10 





Maurice Hewlett, Esq. 


2 2 







— 




Margaret, Lady Heytesbury 


10 







— 




E. J. Orchard, Esq. 


— 




1 


1 





Dr. Blackmore 


— 




1 








0. G. S. Crawford, Esq. 


10 







— 




Mrs. John Pinckney 


10 







— 




John Beddoe, Esq., M.D., L.L.D., F.R.S. 


— 




1 


1 





John E. Ward, Esq. 


10 







— 




Lt. Colonel Moore 


— 






10 





Mrs. Roberts 


10 







— 




The Rev. Canon Bankes 


1 1 







— 




A. S. Hoffe, Esq. 


— 






10 





The Rev. F. T. Wethered 


— 






10 





The Duke of Hamilton 


1 1 







— 




Arthur B. Wood, Esq. 


— 




1 


1 





J. Macklin, Esq. 


— 






10 


6 


The Rev. S. F. Handcock 


10 







— 




The Hon. Louis Greville 


5 







— 




C. S. Awdry, Esq. 


1 







— 




G. S. Hodson, Esq. 


1 1 







— 




A. C. Jonas, Esq. 


1 1 







— 




Miss Clara Manning 


— 






10 





E. Haviland Hillman, Esq. 


— 






10 





Brig.-General Stafford, C.B., R.E. 


— 


; 


1 








Carried forward 


£43 15 


m 


2 






z 2 



332 



The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarv.vi. 





Subscriptions 






for 3 years. 


Donations. 




£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


Brought forward 


43 15 


69 2 


John Howell Westcott, Esq. 


— 


10 


F. J. Arnold, Esq. 


10 


— 


Colonel T. A. Colfox 


10 


— 


J. A. Way, Esq. 


— 


10 


George Richardson, Esq. 


— 


10 


E. A. Eawlence, Esq. 


2 


— 


Stephen Fletcher, Esq. 


10 


— 


Mrs. Egleston 


10 


— 


S. S. Williams, Esq. 


10 


— 


W. H. Carter, Esq. 


— 


10 


Miss Palgrave 


10 


— 


Colonel Birkbeck 


— 


18 


E. W. Gawthorne, Esq. 


— 


10 


Master and Brethren of S. Nicholas Hospi 


tal — 


5 


E. J. Gordon, Esq. 


10 


— 


The Rev. Geoffry Hill 


10 


— 


A. W. Dubourg, Esq. 


— 


10 


The Rev. W. Goodchild 


— 


10 


E. F. Pyesnaith, Esq. 


— 


110 


The Rev. Canon Myers 


10 0. 


— 


Miss Violet Wyld 


— 


10 o 


Captain Sharp 


— 


10 


H. E. Medlicott. Esq. 


10 


— 


The Rev. Sub -Dean Watts 


10 


— 


C. R. Straton, Esq. 


— 


10 


Mrs. Lougheed Baskin 


10 


— 


H. Messenger, Esq. 


10 


— 


F. G. Penrose, Esq. M.D. 


— 


' 10 


Alfred W. N. Burder, Esq., F.S.A. 


110 


— 


The Misses Vaux 


10 


— 


Major-General Wavell, C.B. 


10 


— 


John T. Kemp, Esq. 


10 6 


— 


Miss M. F. C. Lipscombe 


10 


— 


Messrs. Wilton Brothers 


110 


— 


George Fullford, Esq. 


10 


— 


Wm. Main, Esq. 


— 


110 


F. H. T. Jervoise, Esq. 


— 


loo 


The Rev. R. J. Hill 


— 


5 


The Rev. W. S. Shuttleworth 


— 


10 


The Rev. W. E. H. Sotheby 


10 


— 




59 17 6 


85 7 
59 17 6 








£145 4 6 



The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum. 333 

The following article by Mr. W. St. John Hope, which appeared 
in The Times of November 17th, gives an account of the results of 
the work so far as it has at present gone, and is here reprinted 
with the consent of the writer : — 

About If mile due north of the city of Salisbury stands the im- 
posing ancient monument known as Old Sarum. Apart from its 
historical associations, Old Sarum is chiefly remarkable for the 
vast scale of the earthworks of which it consists. The outer 
earthwork is an irregular oval of considerable area, defended by 
a deep and steep-sided ditch, the contents of which have been 
thrown up along both scarps to form a continuous bank, in- 
terrupted only by the entrances on the east and west. The earth- 
work is only partly artificial, as may be seen by an interesting 
section in a disused chalk pit on the north side. The inner bank 
was at one time crested by a massive wall, but only a fragment of 
this remains. In the middle of the area is a smaller and loftier 
earthwork, probably of Norman date, consisting of a deep ditch 
with steep sides, the material from which has been thrown inwards 
to form a high bank, enclosing a nearly circular area of no great 
size. Within this stood the Norman castle. From the castle 
area two transverse ditches are carried across the main enclosure 
to the outer bank, dividing it into two baileys. 

Historical Eetrospect. 

Of the beginnings of Old Sarum nothing is known. There are 
reasons for identifying it with the Boman station of Sorbiodunum 
of the twelfth and fifteenth Antonine Itineraries, but the main 
earthwork is clearly pre-Eoman, and possibly of the early Iron 
Age, if not older. 

Old Sarum was evidently a place of some note in Saxon times, 

coins of Cnut and Edward the Confessor being known which are 

believed to have been struck there. The description of " Saris- 

! berie " in the Domesday Survey does not seem to include the 

'< earthwork, probably because it was then in the King's hands. It 

must, however, have continued to be inhabited, since the seat of 



334 The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum. 

the bishopric of Sherborne was moved hither by Bishop Herman, 
in accordance with the edict of the Council of London of 1075, 
ordering the transfer of episcopal sees from vills to cities. The 
Cathedral Church of Old Sarum was, however, the work of 
Herman's successor, Osmond (1078 — 99), and was hallowed in 
1092. It stood in the north-west quarter of the outer work, 
where its foundations can still be traced after a prolonged drought, 
and during the autumn of 1835 they were sufficiently uncovered 
to show that the Church was a cruciform building, about 270ft. long. 

About the year 1220 the ecclesiastical authorities obtained leave 
to remove from Old Sarum to the new site known as Salisbury, 
and were by degrees followed by the townsfolk. The Cathedral 
Church was left standing until 1331, when the Dean and Chapter 
obtained letters patent from the King empowering them to take 
it down and use the stones for the repair of their Church and the 
walling in of the Close. A chapel of our Lady was to be built to 
mark the site, and remained standing into the 16th century. The 
Eoyal Castle, of course, continued to exist, but fell into decay 
during the fifteenth century, and at the time of John Leland's 
visit, about 1535, he could only record that " much notable ruinous 
building of this castell yet ther remaynith." 

A place with such a history and so early an ending cannot fail 
to give interesting results if scientifically excavated, and a formal 
agreement has lately been made between the Society of Antiquaries 
on the one part and the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury (owners), 
the Ecclesiastical Commissioners (lessees) and their tenant, Mr. 
Carey, on the other part, for the carrying into effect of a proper 
examination of the whole site, to which H.M. Office of Works,! 
under whose care Old Sarum has been placed in accordance with 
the Ancient Monuments Act, has also given its approval. 

The Nature of the Operations. 

Circumstances being favourable, operations were begun onl 
August 23rd last, under the direction of Lieut.-Colonel Havvley 
and Mr. Hope, and continued without interruption down tc 
November 5th. The part selected for examination was the castle 



The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum. 335 

area in the middle of the site. It was known that the original 
timber defences had early been replaced by masonry, the tower or 
keep being mentioned in the Pipe Eoll of 1130-1, while the 
" houses," walls, gates, treasury, and well are repeatedly referred 
to in the accounts of Henry II. 's reign. The first work attacked 
was the east gate, of which some rubble cores were still visible, 
but the passage was buried under six or eight feet of fallen masonry 
and rubbish. This was soon cleared away, disclosing a passage 
some 36ft. long, flanked by two strong towers, and defended 
originally by stout outer doors. "Within the doorway on either 
hand was a guard-chamber with a fireplace. In the north wall of 
the passage a place has been hollowed out for the porter's seat. 
The upper part of the gatehouse has unfortunately gone, as well 
as most of the ashlar facing of the concrete core. 

After the clearing of a way into the castle, operations were 
begun upon the opposite side of the bailey, where lofty grass- 
covered mounds indicated the site of large buildings. Work here 
gradually disclosed the remains of a large block, over 80ft. long 
and still some 20ft. high, built partly upon and partly in front of 
the chalk rampart of the original defences, This block contained 
four chambers— two small ones which have not yet been cleared, 
and two others of unequal size, which appear to form the base of 
a large tower, 40ft. square, within. This can now be identified 
j with " the tower above the postern " mentioned in a Literate Eoll 
! of 1246, inasmuch as further investigation disclosed the postern 
j beside it. This consisted of a narrow passage of masonry through 
| the rampart, defended by inner and outer doorways, and opening 
originally upon a wooden bridge across the ditch leading from the 
i outer bailey. 

Much of the work of excavation has necessarily been devoted to 

clearing the inner bailey of the huge mounds of fallen rubbish, 

and this has been largely effected by the laying clown of a tramway 

i which enabled the de'bris to be carried into the outer area, where 

it has been temporarily deposited until arrangements can be made 

j for its removal. This clearing of the bailey will enable the in- 

■ : vestigators, when work is resumed in the spring, to begin at once 



336 The Excavation of the Site of Old Sarum. 

laying bare the base of the great tower and other buildings on the 
north side of the site and to search for and empty the well, which 
must have been of great depth. 

As much of the past season's work was confined to the removal 
of fallen masonry and rubbish, not many antiquities and objects 
of interest have yet come to light. They include, however, a 
number of important architectural fragments indicative of the 
character and date of the great tower, &c, and a large quantity of 
broken pottery, all of the medieval period, together with the usual 
assortment of nails, bits of lead and iron, and a few more artistic 
objects, including a pretty gilt bronze pendant pounced with a 
fleur-de-lys of early type. The upper half of an undoubted Roman 
quern, a large piece of another of Andernach lava, and some 
fragments of Roman tile, foreshadow the finding in due course of 
earlier antiquities than those belonging to the Castle period. 

To carry out the work on an adequate scale some £600 or £700 
will be required annually, and the work will probably occupy 
eight or ten years. All antiquities and objects of interest found 
will, of course, be the property of the Dean and Chapter of 
Salisbury, and arrangements are being made for their preservation 
and exhibition in Salisbury itself. 



337 






WILTS -OBITUARY. 

Rev. Philip Edward Miles, died May 2nd, 1909, aged 78. 
Buried at Odstock. Son of John Miles, of Watford House, Herts. 
Born September 25th, 1830. Educated at Harrow and Caius Coll., 
Camb., 1853 ; deacon 1855 ; priest 1856 (Line). Curate of Barton-on- 
Humber, Lines., 1855 — 58; Castle Bytham, Lines., 1859 — 65 ; perpetual 
curate of Owslebury, Hants, 1865 — 68 ; rector of Odstock, 1868 until 
his death. The Church was restored and the Bectory enlarged during 
his incumbency. He married 1862 Eleanor Sarah, d.' of the Bev. 
William Jex Blake, rector of Little Dunham, Norf. , who with four sons 
and seven daughters survives him. 

Obit, notice, Salisbury Journal, May 8th, Salisbury Diocesan 
Gazette, June, 1909. 

Thomas Longman Mills, died August 14th, 1909. 

Buried at Orcheston St. George. Son of Edmund Francis Mills, of 
Tilshead Farm, where he was born. Early in life he bought Shrewton 
House and the farm attached to it of Mr. Sheppard, of Frome. Here 
he resided until his death. He married Fanny, d. of William Brown 
Canning, tenant of Elston Farm, which became the property of Mr. T. 
L. Mills in 1903 and was occupied by him in addition to Shrewton. He 
thus farmed fully 3,000 acres of land, and was one of the most prominent 
gentlemen farmers in S. Wilts, and took an active part in public matters. 
He was an alderman of the County Council, J. P. for Wilts, church- 
warden of Shrewton for many years, and held many other offices. His 
wife survives him, but he leaves no children. 
Obit, notice, Devizes Gazette, Aug. 19th, 1909. 

George LudlOW Lopes. Died Oct. 3rd, 1909, aged 73. Buried at 
Westbury Cemetery. Born 1836, 5th son of Sir Balph Lopes, 2nd 
Baronet. Married, 1871, GeorginaE., d. of Anselmo de Arroyave. J. P. 
for Wilts 1876, D.L. for Wilts. Served in 16th Lancers and N. Devon 
Yeomanry. Lived formerly at Hardenhuish and Greenhill, Warminster, 
and for the last 20 years at Northleigh, Bradford-on-Avon. 
Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Oct. 9th, 1909. 

John Thomas FOWell. Died Sept. 17th, 1909. Buried at Easton 
Royal. Born at Warminster Oct. 8th, 1822. He learned farming in 
Dorsetshire, became tenant of Aughton Farm, Collingbourne, 1844, and 
removed to Easton Hill Farm, 1847, which he held until he retired from 
business in 1899. He continued however to reside at Easton Hill House 
until his death. A keen sportsman he was known as " the Father of 
the Tedworth Hunt." A Conservative and staunch Churchman, widely 



338 Wilts Obituary. 

known and respected by agriculturists. He married, 1844, Jane Homer, 
youngest daughter of Thomas Homer, of Bere Begis, Dorset, who died 
1896. His only son died 1898. 

Long obit, notice, Devizes Gazette, Sept. 23rd, 1909. Salisbury 
Journal, Sept. 25th, 1909. 

Rev. Walter Lomer Barnes. Died Aug. 3ist, 1909. King's 

Coll., Lond., 1862; All Souls' Coll., Oxon., B.A., 1869; M.A., 1873. 
Deacon 1874, Priest 1875,Lond. Curate of Fulham, 1874—78 ; St. Saviour, 
Fitzroy Square, 1878—82 ; St. George in the East, 1882—84 ; Walcot, 
Bath, 1884—86 ; Vicar of Alberbury, Salop, 1886—94 ; Bector of Bar- 
ford St. Martin, 1894 until his death. 

Obit, notice, Guardian, Sept. 8, 1909. Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, 
Oct., 1909. 

Rev. Messing Rudkin. Died Sept. 1st, 1909. Educated Church 
Missionary College, Islington. Associate King's Coll., London, 1871. 
Deacon 1871, Priest 1872, Gloucester and Bristol. Curate of St. Luke, 
Barton Hill, Bristol, 1871—73 ; St. James, Cheltenham, 1873 ; Easting- 
ton (Glouc), 1875—77; St. James, Gloucester, 1877—78; Vicar of 
Horsley with Shortwood and Chavenage, 1878— 87 ; Vicar of St. Mark's, 
Birmingham, 1887—1907 ; Vicar of Froxfield, 1907 until his death. 
The work of his life was done at Birmingham in a very poor and difficult 
parish. During his incumbency at Froxfield he had secured the enlarge- 
ment of the churchyard, and was building a new school at the time of 
his death. Author of A History of Horsley, 1884. 

Obit, notices, Guardian, Sept. 8th ; Devizes Gazette, Sept. 9th, 1909. 
Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, Oct., 1909. 

Rev. Mark WarbUl'ton, died October 12th, 1909, aged 91. Queen's 
Coll., Oxon., BA. 1843; M.A. 1851; B.D. 1858. Deacon 1847, Priest 
1848 (Lichfield). Curate of Wirksworth 1847—48; Bromley Begis, 
Staffs, 1848—53 ; chaplain to Earl of Ellesmere 1853—57 ; Perpetual 
Curate of Bevesby, Lines. 1857 — 66 ; Bector of Kilmington 1866 until 
his death. 

Rev. Edward Arthur Pearse, died July, 1909. Buried at 
Corston. King's Coll., Loudon. Deacon 1882 Dover, Priest 1883 Cant. 
Curate of Chislet 1882—85; Buckerell 1885—86; Tipton 1887-90; 
Dittisham 1890—93; Braunton 1894—98; Dittisham 1900—1903. Vicar 
of Corston with Bodbourne 1903 until his death. 

Rev Jabez Gray Carpenter, died September 7th, 1909, at 

Newport, Essex. Buried at Clavering Congregational Burial Ground, 
Essex. Born at Trowbridge 1817. Educated Cheshunt College and 
London University. Pastor of Congregational Churches at Canterbury, 
Kidderminster, Clavering and Woodbridge. 

Obit, notice, Wiltshire Times, Sept. 25th, 1909. 



Wilts Obituary. 339 

Rev. Henry Alexander Carwardine. Died June 5th, 1909. 

aged 77. St. John's Coll., Camb., B.A., 1853 ; M.A., 1856. Deacon 
1854, Priest 1855, Eochester. Vicar of Tolleshunt Major, Essex, 1856 
— 76. Vicar of Ogbourne St. Andrew, 1876 until his death. 

Rev. James John JaCOb, died Nov. 21st, 1909, aged 86. 
Emmanuel Coll., Camb. B.A. 1845, M.A. 1848. Deacon 1846, Priest 
(Salisbury) 1847. Curate of Berwick Bassett, 1846-50; Chaplain Salis- 
bury Infirmary, 1850-53 ; Curate of Fisherton Anger, 1853-58; Vicar of 
Horningsham, 1858-1900, when he resigned and retired to live at 
Salisbury. Bural Dean of Heytesbury, 1874-95; Prebendary and Canon 
of Salisbury, 1881. 

Obit, notices, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 25th ; Salisbury Diocesan 
Gazette, Dec, 1909. 

Herbert BiggS, died June 18th, 1909, aged 58. High Constable of 
Devizes. Town Councillor, 1885. Alderman, 1895-1907, when he 
resigned. Mayor, 1899. J. P., 1901. His father and grandfather were 
each twice Mayor of Devizes. 

Long obit, notice, Wiltshire Advertiser, June 24th, 1909. 

Rev. Charles Henry Townsend, died Nov., 1909. Line. Coll., 

Oxon. B.A. 1850, M.A. 1852. Deacon 1851, Priest 1852 (Salisbury). 
Curate of Laverstock, 1851—61; Vicar of Mere, 1861-81; Vicar of 
Little Bedwyn, 1881-93. 



340 



RECENT WILTSHIRE BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, 
ARTICLES, &c. 

[N.B. — This list does not claim to be in any way exhaustive. The Editor 
appeals to all authors and publishers of pamphlets, books, or views in any 
way connected with the county to send him copies of their works, and to 
editors of papers and members of the Society generally to send him copies 
of articles, views, or portraits, appearing in the newspapers.] 

Life in an English Village; an Economic and 
Historical Survey of the Parish of Corsley, in 

Wiltshire. By M. P. DavieS. T. Fisher Unwin, London : 
Adelphi Terrace. Leipsic : Inselstrasse 20. MCMIX. 

9in. X 5fin., pp. xi. + 5 unnumbered + 319. Cloth. 10*. 6d. net. 
Seven illustrations — An Old Inhabitant ; Map of the Parish ; Cley Hill ; 
The Old Church, pulled down cir. 1830 (S. view, from an accurate 
drawing) ; Cottage with Weaver's window, inhabited by John Mines, the 
last weaver in Corsley ; Corsley Heath Wagon Works (a group of work- 
men) ; Temple and the Longleat Woods. 

" In 1905, when a student at the London School of Economics, it was 
suggested to me by Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Webb that I should pursue my 
studies of Economic History and Social Science by making an investigation 
into the history and present conditions of the parish in which I was 
living, and it is upon the research and investigations begun at that time 
that this monograph is based." So says the authoress— Miss Maud F. 
Davies — in her preface. 

The book is a stout volume on good paper, well printed, and its scope 
may be judged of from the proportionate length of the two parts into which 
it is divided ; Part I., " Corsley in the past " occupying pp. 4 — 96, whilst 
Part II., " Corsley in the present " fills pp. 99 — 290. 

The appendices contain a translation of the grant of the manor of 
Corsley in 1245 to the nuns of Studley ; an Inquisition of 1337 ; 
translation of an extent of the manor of Whitbourne in 1364 ; a 
translation of the Papal Bull of 1415, giving the right of sepulture to 
Corsley, which before that time bad buried at Warminster; an in 
interesting order of 1635, assigning the seats in the Church to their 
respective occupiers ' ; and a list of incumbents and patrons of Corsley 
from 1250 to 1902. Extracts from the overseers' accounts of 1729, the 
Census Reports, and the farming accounts of Mr. John Barton in 1804, 
together with a list of references to Corsley, MS. and printed, are also 

1 This curious order, which exists amongst the parish records, showing a 
plan of the Church with every seat marked, is not here illustrated, but a 
photograph of it is inserted in the copy of the book in the Society's library. 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 341 

given. It is a pity that most of the names mentioned in these appendices, 
as well as many of those in the body of the work, do not appear in the 
index, which might have been fuller with advantage. 

The early and medieval history of the place is only touched upon in 
the lightest way, but at the twenty-fifth page the author arrives at the 
year 1666, when George Carey, cloth worker, appears in the parish with 
his token, and the book really begins at this point. The Carey family 
remained in the parish for two hundred years as clothiers and maltsters. 
With the beginning of the eighteenth century several other clothiers, who 
were evidently men of substance, are found to be established there. In 
1691 the population is estimated by the author at 700, in 1701 at 500 f 
in 1731 at 700, and in 1760 at 1300, The interesting fact is noted from 
the Longleat Survey Book of 1745 that at all events up to 1732 rents 
were partly paid in kind or in service, a day's work with plough often 
forming part of the specified rent. 

The parish registers for the eighteenth century are carefully analysed, 
and the rise and fall of the death and birth rates for the different periods 
are given, and explanations are suggested for their variations. In 1741 
the whole of Corsley Heath was enclosed and allotted to twenty-seven 
persons who had common rights. After 1730 the cloth trade increased 
very rapidly, as is seen by the number of persons connected with it to 
whom leases were granted, and with this increase of the manufacturing 
population a number of other tradesmen to supply their wants appear. 

The overseers' accounts from 1729 to 1740 show that from £160 to 
£200 was annually expended in poor relief though the condition of the 
parish then seems to have been very prosperous, the pensions given by 
the overseers varying from 1*. to 12.?. a month. The population, estimated 
at 1300 in 1760, grew rapidly with the prosperity of the cloth industry 
until about 1830, and at the fitst census in 1831 numbered 1729. It was 
probably even larger just before this date. All stages of the cloth manu- 
facture were carried on in the parish, including preparing, spinning, 
dying, weaving, shearing, and finishing. " Some of the weaving was 
done in weaving factories where several looms would be kept at work 
. . . . but the greater part of the yarn was woven by independent 
workers at their own homes. The loom was fatted up in a long weaving 
shed at the back of the house, or else in the dwelling itself .... 
probably few houses, from that of the yeoman farmer down to the 
labourer's cottage, were at this time without a loom." In the first 
quarter of the nineteenth century, when agricultural wages 'were about 
8s. a week, workers in the clothing factories at Corsley could earn from 
13*. to 30.5. a week. At this period " three-fourths of the population were 
dependent upon manufactures and trades, and one-fourth on agriculture." 
In 1783 the whole parish was enclosed and divided up, and this rendering 
improved methods of agriculture possible, the parish became almost 
wholly arable, and few cows were kept after the enclosure. 

Coming to religious matters the Wesleyans had established themselves 
in the parish in 1769, the Baptists in 1777, and the Congregationalists in 
1771. In 1830 the Parish Church, which, judging from the sketch here 



342 Recent Wiltshire Boohs, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

given was a very pleasing building, chiefly of late work, being in bad 
repair, and " its accommodation being insufficient," was pulled down and 
a larger Church built. 

The fortunes of the " Workhouse" opened in 1773, the work done by 
its inmates, and the feeding of them, with its annual cost, are followed 
until it degenerated into a mere disorderly " Poorhouse " in 1802. The 
bad times of the early years of the nineteenth century, the gradual 
decay of the cloth making industry later on, and the agricultural 
depression and consequent changes in agriculture which between 1870 
and 1885 transformed Corsley from a wheat growing to a dairy farming 
parish, with the result that its population which numbered 1621 in 
1841 was reduced in 1901 to 824, all receive due attention. In the 
middle of the nineteenth century the most notable men in Corsley were 
Mr. Barton, of Corsley House, Mr. H. A. Fussell, the dyer of Sturford 
Mead, Mr. Taunton, the clothier of the Mill Farm, and Mr. Coombes, 
the silk manufacturer — " a very reserved man who kept no company, 
except that once every month he gave a dinner to all the people in the 
parish who had only one leg, one arm, or one eye." 

The real pith and kernel of the book, however, lies in the second part, 
in which the author claims to present " what may be considered a 
picture of Corsley in 1905-6." She may well claim this. The modern 
life and circumstances of no other parish in Wiltshire.probably of no other 
country parish in England, have ever before been depicted on this scale of 
accurate analysis. There seems to be nothing touching the life of any 
one of the 800 inhabitants of Corsley which has not been enquired into, 
discovered, tabulated, and arranged in its proper position, in order that 
this account of rural life may be absolutely trustworthy and accurate 
and full. The scope of the inquiries, which embraced every farnity in j 
the parish, included the place of birth, age, sex, employment, wages, 
religion, and personal character of each person, amount of land held and 
character of cultivation, rent and number of rooms in each house, I 
friendly societies, insurance, women's earnings, rent of land, profits of 
garden, and in many cases which are here given in full, the actual I 
detailed budgets of expenditure by the housewives and the menus oi\ 
every meal served for a week in labourers' cottages in Corsley. These [ 
are set forth in a long series of tables. The result of the elaborate series j 
of calculations as to income and cost of living, is that of the 220 house- 
holds in the parish " about five-sevenths are above poverty, rather less I 
than one-sixth in secondary poverty, about one-eighth in primary! 
poverty." In the 165 cottages there is more than a room apiece for the 
624 persons inhabiting them. " Out of 70 households whose head is a 
labourer only 16 are in primary poverty and 13 in secondary poverty ; I 
the remaining 41 are therefore above this line." 

The author writes in conclusion as follows : — " One is accustomed to I 
think of the labourers of Wilts and Dorset as the worst paid and most, 
poverty stricken class in Rural England. Looking, therefore, to find 
poverty in a Wiltshire village, it was no small surprise to the investi- 
gator to discover that the majority of the inhabitants were in quite J 






Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 343 

affluent circumstances, and that only about one eighth of the house- 
holds had an income insufficient, with wise and careful management, to 
provide food and clothing adequate in quantity and quality to keep all 
the members in full health and vigour. . . First and foremost this 
prosperity results from the distribution of land in the parish, from the 
good gardens attached to each cottage, the abundance of allotment land, 
the number of small holdings . . ." 

This book is a monument of scientific industry and accuracy. For 
every conclusion stated, the premises on which it is based are placed 
before the reader, who is thus enabled to judge of the evidence 
himself. There is no vague theorising, nor any attempt to make 
awkward facts fit in with preconceived opinions. It is and will always 
remain a standard authority for present day conditions in the life of a 
somewhat favourably-situated Wiltshire village. 



Survey of the lands of William, First Earl of Pem- 
broke. Transcribed from vellum rolls in the possession of the Earl 
of Pembroke and Montgomery. With an Introduction by the Transcriber, 
Charles R. Straton, F.R.C.S., F.E.S., Fellow of the Royal Society of 
Medicine, and a Preface by the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery. 
Oxford: Privately printed for presentation to the members of the 
Roxburgh Club. MCMIX. 

Two vols., 11 J X 9in. Printed at the University Press. Half-bound. 

Vol. I., pp. xcix. (of which the Introduction fills pp. xvii — xeix) + 314, 

Vol. II. Title, contents, and list of illustrations, 6 pp., unnumbered 

+ pp. 317—624. 

It will be remembered that in vol. xxxii. p. 288 of this Magazine, Dr. 
Straton printed a paper on " An English Manor in the time of Elizabeth." 
This paper was founded on the great MS. Survey which he had then 
begun to edit, and his work has now been completed by the issue by 
the Earl of Pembroke of these handsome volumes, in which large 
margins, excellent paper, beautiful type and illustrations, are combined 
to produce, not only a fine book in itself, but one of the most important 
works for the topography and manorial history of the County of Wilts 
ever published. 

The origin of the work is thus told by Lord Pembroke in the Preface : 
" Some four or five years ago, while turning out a quantity of lumber, 
including old pieces of armour, mantelpieces, &c, from the gallery of the 
Riding School at Wilton, the workmen came upon a plain wooden box, 
which, upon being opened, was found to contain three ancient vellum 
rolls. These rolls, upon examination, proved to be a full and — so far 
as they go — a complete survey of the land of William, first Earl of 
Pembroke of the present creation." 

These rolls are here printed in full with the curious pen drawings accom- 
panying them excellently reproduced. Dr. Straton's analysis is a masterly 
review of the bearing of the facts contained in these rolls on all manner 
of subjects, from manorial customs of abstruse origin to the comparative 



344 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

prevalence of Christian names in Wiltshire and Devonshire in the middle 
of the sixteenth century. Taking the names mentioned in the survey 
Dr. Straton finds in Wiltshire that in every hundred the order of fre- 
quency was as follows: — John 22, William 15, Thomas 10, Eichard 6, 
Henry 5, Robert 4, Edward 3 George, Stephen, and Walter 2, Alexander, 
Edmund, Nicholas, Philip, Roger, and Simon, 1 ; whilst girls' names 
occur with the following frequency : — Jane 23, Alice 13, Elizabeth 6, 
Margaret and Agnes 5, Edith and Christian 4, Anna, Julia, Blitha, Joan, 
Mary, Katherine, and Thomasina, 2, Denise and Margery 1. 

The origin of the surnames mentioned is also discussed, and Plough, 
White dog, White hart, Buck, Bull, Fox, Cock, Chough, Crane, Nightin- 
gale, &c, are explained as taken from the signs of inns or shops. 

The first twenty-eight pages of the Introduction are taken up with the 
descent and history of William Herbert Earl of Pembroke, and his wives 
Anne Parr and Anne Compton; the remainder with the customs of the 
various manors, and the hundred and one other matters of interest upon 
which the survey of one manor or another throws light. Among buildings 
named are the " Court of the Belhouse, " the chief court of the seignory of 
the abbey, the Shirehall, and the Brown Bower (or Lockup) at Wilton, 
the Church House at Ramsbury and elsewhere. The Hospital or Priory 
of St. Giles, stood behind the present laundry of Wilton House, 
" the Chapel of which was converted into two cottages during the last 
century, and some remains still exist .... The Hospital was used 
as a leper hospital, and many of the old inhabitants believed that they 
had seen ' The leprosy Queen ' walk in the dark part of the road where 
it formerly stood. It was removed in 1830 to a site in Fugglestone — 
farther west — and is now an almshouse." 

The Manor House at Dinton contained a hall, parlour, kitchen, cham- 
bers and chapel. Knighton Manor had a Church in which the Vicar 
of Broad Chalke was bound to say divine service " every Sunday and 
on all Feastful days in the year, and every Monday, Wednesday, and 
Friday in the year." This does not appear to be the chantry in 
Broad Chalke Church. " A few years ago there was an old hollow stone 
in the garden of Knighton Manor, like the base of a cross, and a sketch 
in an old terrier shows a small building between the house and the 
river, with a bell cot on the roof ridge." 

The surveys of the Wiltshire manors are contained in Vol. I., those of 
Devonshire and elsewhere in Vol. II., and to the contents of the survey 
itself the editor has added, as appendices, The Customal of South Newton 
A.D. 1315; Decree by the courte of Augmentacions upon the composition 
betwyne the Propriatories of the Parsonage of Chalke and the late monas- 
tery of Wilton ; Inquisitio p.m. William Earl of Pembroke ; Will of 
William first Earl of Pembroke ; Originalia Roll 35 Hen. VIII. ; Patent 
Roll 5 Edw. VI. 

The illustrations include portraits of William, first Earl, from the 
Heroologia, and from a medal ; the Court of the Belhouse, Wilton ; 
Anne, Countess of Pembroke, daughter of Thomas, Lord Parr of Kendal, 
ob. 1552, from stained glass in Wilton Church, formerly in the chapel of 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 345 

Wilton House. Reproduced from pen drawings on the rolls themselves are, 
The Earl of Pembroke presenting his commission to his commissioners 
in presence of his son ; Bird's-eye views of Wilton and Paignton(Devon) ; 
Wilton House, East Front and Entrance, showing the original forecourt; 
several reproductions of portions of the rolls ; and a plan of the fields of 
the manor of Stoford, showing the lands of one tenant. 

In addition to these full-page illustrations a number of little pen 
drawings of the manor houses and Churches are reproduced in the text 
from the rolls. Of these the houses have distinctly more character than 
the Churches, and are much more convincing. The Churches include 
Wilton, S. Newton, Fugglestone, Chiltnark (with a tall spire), Stanton, 
Mildenhall, Pewsey, Dinton, Patney, Winterbourne Bassett, Berwick St. 
John, Wylye, Bishopstone, and Damerham. The manor houses of 
Knighton, East Overton, the fine front and forecourt of Ramsbury, 
Wardour Castle, and the House and Park in the Forest of Grovely are 
shown. 

It should be mentioned that the full indexes of persons and places are 
the work of Mr. T. H. Baker, who also undertook the larger portion of 
the actual work of transcription from the original rolls. 

In the course of a long review in The Reliquary for October, 1909, 
vol. xv., p. 279, Dr. Cox, than whom none is better qualified to express 
an opinion on the subject, says : — " Having a close acquaintanceship, at 
first hand, during many years, with actual manor court-rolls, and surveys, 
I have no hesitation whatever in saying that this work is the most im- 
portant contribution made to the subject for upwards of a hundred years." 

Noticed also in Guardian, Sept. 22nd, 1909. 

Avebury Excavations, 1909. By H. St. George 
Gray. British Association Report. 8vo, pp. is. 

The Committee on the Age of Stone Circles in the two pages which 
they prefix to Mr. Gray's account of the work done say, " The main 
result achieved from the deep cuttings in the fosse is a confirmation of 
the opinion arrived at last year as to the probable date of the monument. 
Additional positive evidence has been obtained from the objects discovered 
in the lowest layers of silting, and on the original bottom of the ditch. 
These in all cases are objects such as are characteristic of the Neolithic 
period, and although it would be hazardous to state definitely that they 
must be of Neolithic date and cannot belong to the Bronze Age, the 
negative evidence, afforded by a total absence of copper or bronze, and 
of objects which are certainly of Bronze Age, affords powerful con- 
firmation of the probability of the earlier date being the right one." 

On the floor of the ditch, at a depth of over 17ft. below the present 
surface a chipped flint knife of Neolithic type was found and close to it 
a deer horn pick, and three other antler picks were also found on the 
bottom of the ditch. In the second cutting two shoulder blades of ox 
were found on the bottom of the ditch (a depth of 20ft. 6in. below the 
present surface at the point nearest the road), which are supposed to 
have been used as shovels. The width of the flat bottom of the ditch 

. XXXVI. — NO, CXII. 2 A 



346 Recent Wiltshire Boohs, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

varied from lljft. to 17ft. A third cutting close on the west side of the 
modern road was made in the hope of finding the original causeway of 
the entrance, which was afterwards discovered on the other (the east) 
side of the road. ■ At this point a considerable amount of soil had been 
deposited in modern times when the road was made or widened, and the 
bottom was reached at 23ft. from the surface. Nothing was found on 
the bottom here. As has been said the original entrance causeway of un- 
disturbed chalk was found on the east side of the road, at a depth of only 
lft. 6in. below the present surface of the turf. This causeway was 24ft. 
wide at the top, and the two great stones of the outer circle still standing 
are evidently the portals through which it ran. It was apparently to 
avoid these stones that the modern road was made on the western side 
of the ancient causeway. 

Mr. Gray's report is as minutely accurate and full as was that written 
by him last year. 

Cambridge County Geographies. Wiltshire By 
A. G. Bradley, with Maps, Diagrams, and Illust- 
rations. Cambridge : at the University Press, 1909. 

Linen, 7£ X 5, pp. xi + 156. Price Is. &d., coloured Physical Map, 
and Geological Map of Wiltshire, and 77 illustrations, including half-tone 
views of the Cathedral and the Churches ofBremhill,Bromham,Bemerton, 
Avebury (2), Purton, Devizes St. John, Bradford-on-Avon Parish and 
Saxon Churches, Marlborough St. Mary's Doorway, Amesbury, Eding- 
ton, Wanborough, Brinkworth, Cricklade, Malmesbury Abbey, Hinton 
Parva, and Wroughton. The King's House and Poultry Cross, Salisbury ; 
Wilton House ; Church House, Potterne ; Flemish Houses, Corsham; 
Aldbourne Cross ; Longford Castle.; The Moot and Moot House, Downton; 
Wootton Bassett Town Hall ; Wardour Castle ; Old Sarmn ; Stonehenge 
(2) ; Avebury Pont ; South Wraxall ; Littlecote ; Bradford Barn and the 
Hall ; Swindon Town Hall ; Malmesbury Cross ; Silbury ; and a number 
of other views and portraits. The scope of this most useful school book is 
best seen by the headings of its various sections : — " Position and Natural 
Conditions; Size, Shape, Boundaries; Surface and General Features ; 
Watersheds and rivers ; Geology ; Natural History ; Climate and 
Rainfall; Bace, Dialect, Population; Agriculture, Cultivations, &c. ; 
Industries and Manufactures; Mines and Minerals; History; Antiquities; 
Architecture — Ecclesiastical, Military, Domestic; Communications past 
and present; Roll of Honour of the County; Administration and 
Divisions, Ancient and modern; The Chief Towns and Villages." Each 
section is, of course, dealt with but shortly, but the author knows what he 
is talking about, and the different subjects are handled in a knowledgeable 
way. The printing and the illustrations are good, and the letterpress 
has, as is to be expected from Mr. Bradley, a pleasant literary flavour 
Why the publishers have illustrated a Paleolithic implement from Kent's 
Cavern and a Neolithic celt from Bridlington, as though Wiltshire objects 
of the kind could not be given, is known only to themselves. The in. 
formation given under the different sections is generally accurate, butj 






Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 347 

there is one mistake — the whole county is placed in the diocese of 
Salisbury, whereas some eighty parishes in the north belong to the 
diocese of Bristol. 

Noticed, Devizes Gazette, Sept. 6th, 1909. 

Report of the Marlborough College Natural History- 
Society for the year ending Christmas, 1908. 

No. 57. Marlborough: 1909. 

I The report records, as usual, good work done by many of the sections 

of the society during 1908. There is, as usual, an elaborate series of 
meteorological observations for the year from the summary of which it 
appears that the mean temperature was 47.7° — almost exactly normal. 
The rainfall was 26.11 inches — about 5f inches below the corrected 
average for thirty-three years, which is 31.80. 

In the ornithological section the most remarkable notices are of a 
Peregrine Falcon shot near Marlborough, in September, by a man in the 
employ of Mr. Lyne, of Barton Farm ; and a Fork-tailedPetrel(C^»zo^Aorea 
leuchorrhoa) found dead, which has been placed in the College Museum. 

In the botanical section Vicia lathyroides, a plant new to the district, 
was found rather commonly on dry banks at Wroughton, and Epilobium 
nummular if olium, a New Zealand species, is mentioned as having 
apparently established itself at Marlborough. Centaurea solstitialis 
too, occurred near Aldbourne. 

There is a note on the great snowstorm of April 25th, 1908, when the 
snow was 13in. deep at Marlborough, and three striking photographs 
of The High Street, Dr. Maurice's Garden, and The Riverside on that 
day are given. 

Wiltshire Notes and Queries, No. 64, Bee. 1908. 

Mr. E. Kite has a valuable contribution to Wiltshire Bibliography 
in an article on " Wiltshire Topography [1659 — 1843] with some notes 
on the late Sir Thomas Phillipps and his Historical Collections for the 
County," illustrated by a portrait of Sir T. Phillipps. Mr. Kite gives a 
catalogue of the principal Wiltshire materials printed by Sir Thomas 
Phillipps, and extracts from the Eibliotheca Phillippsiana, a list of the 
more important Wiltshire MSS. in his collection. The sale of this 
collection has been going on at irregular intervals since 1886, the 
thirteenth sale having taken place on June 13th, 1908. Much of the 
collection still remains to be disposed of. In addition to the various 
articles continued from the last number, there are notes on Dositheus 
Wyer, Vicar of Chitterne, and a long review by Mr. Kite of Canon Mayo's 
A Genealogical Account of the Mayo and Elton Families of Wilts 
and Herefordshire. 

NO. 65, March, 1909. "The Association 

I Oath Rolls for Wiltshire." The association was one that was formed 

2 A 2 



348 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

for the king's protection in consequence of a reported plot to assasinate 
William III. on the 15th February, 1695-6. It was signed by thousands 
of people throughout the kingdom. The list of the Devizes signatories 
is here printed. A note is given on Queen Anne's visit to Whetham in 
1703, as the guest of John Kyrle Ernie, grandson of Sir John Ernie, 
Chancellor of the Exchequer under Charles II. and James II. 

Wiltshire Notes and Queries, No. 66, June, 1909. 

The number begins with an article on Ruth Pierce, with a reproduction of 
the leaflet signed by Ralph Good, mayor, on December 27th, 1760, giving 
the inscription on a tablet placed in the Butchers' Shambles, which stood 
in the centre of the Market Place, Devizes, until about 1790, when the 
Landlord of the " Bear " (William Halcomb) affixed the tablet to the base 
of the double column surmounted by the Bear (now over the doorway of 
the Hotel) which stood in the open Market Place and was removed in 1801. 
This original inscription is now in Devizes Museum. On the present 
Market Cross, erected by Benjamin Wyatt, for Lord Sidmouth, in 1814, : 
new and altered version of the inscription is fixed, of which a photograph 
is given. Mr. Kite contributes interesting "Notes on the Churchwardens' 
Accounts of the Parish of North Newnton," which, beginning in 1576, 
include in the Inventory of Church Goods for that year " one Rochetc, 
for the Clarke," " a carpet or covering of blewe for the table," " one 
cloathe for the fonte," and " one cloth of silke for the pulpitt." An 
abstract of the Will of Samuel Michell, of Notton, 1694, is printed, and 
mention is made of a unique penny, of the reign of Stephen, from the 
Dartford find, purchased at the Rashleigh Sale recently by Messrs. Earle 
& Shirley Fox, which bears the name of Devizes on the reverse. The 
Wiltshire references in the Genealogist, vol. xxii. — xxiv., 1905 — 1907, are 
usefully extracted by the Editor. 

NO. 67, Sept. 1909. The principal article i 

this number, in addition to the continuations from former numbers, i 
one by Mr. Kite on " Some old Wiltshire Clocks and Clockmakers, 
This is a valuable contribution to the history of Wiltshire handicraft! 
and covers ground which has not before been touched. He gives a lis 
of sixty-eight Wiltshire clockmakers working in twenty-eight differen 
localities in the county, chiefly in the eighteenth century. A learner 
note on " Lenten Veils " is contributed by Canon Chr. Wordsworth 

In addition to the subjects mentioned above, the Records of Erchfo: 
and Stert are continued in Nos. 64 and 65 ; The Calendar of Feet 
Fines for Wiltshire in No. 65 ; The Chrysoin Book of St. Thomas, Ne 
Sarum, in Nos. 65, 66, and 67 ; Genealogical Notes on the Houlto 
family, with a pedigree in the last number, in 64, 65, 66 ; whilst Quakd 
Burials in Wiltshire ; Peculiars of the Dean and Chapter of Sarum ; anj 
Notes on the Stokes family (with portrait of Frances, Duchess of Suffol 
and her husband, Adrian Stokes, and an illustration of the Stokes Bra: , ( 
in Seend Church) run through all four numbers. 






Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 349 

Silbury Hill, Avebury, and the West Kennet Long 

BarrOW. A short article by H. St. G. Gray in Country Life, July 
24th, 1909, calling the attention of the travelling public to these monu- 
ments, and incidentally mentioning that although the barrow is under 
the protection of H.M. Office of Works, a fire recently lighted to burn 
up the docks, nettles, &c, which had been cleared off it, had been so 
placed as to fracture one of the standing sarsens on the barrow and split 
a large piece off it. Two photos of the long barrow are given, one of 
which shows this fractured stone; a third photo shows " The modern 
road into Avebury," with the recent excavations in progress at the side 
of it. 

William Beckford's Adventure in Diplomacy An 

Unpublished Correspondence. Article by Louis Melville in 
The Nineteenth Century, May, 1909, pp. 783—799. 

" Hitherto everyone has been ignorant that he (Beckford) dabbled un- 
officially in high politics, and actually endeavoured, by the unaided 
efforts of himself and his agents, to arrange a basis for a treaty of peace 
between France and England in the year 1797. . . . The corres- 
pondence is now printed with the object to make public Beckford's 
interesting adventure in diplomacy, but it also throws some light upon 
Beckford's activity and thoroughness as a collector." The Letters are 
eleven in number, two of them from Beckford himself and eight from 
Nicholas Williams, his agent in Paris, six of them addressed to Beckford 
and one to James Goddard, of Salisbury. 

Ruth Fierce. The story of her death in Devizes Market on Jan. 25th, 
1753, with the reprint of a leaflet describing it, signed by Kalph Good, 
Mayor of Devizes, issued in 1760, together with a good photo of the 
Market Cross. Wiltshire Times, Aug. 21st, 1909. 

Sir John PerrOtt, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, temp. Q. Elizabeth, 
is the subject of an interesting note in Wiltshire Times, Aug. 21st, 1909. 
He purchased St. Ellen's Well and a Chapel called St Ellen's Chapel 
with other property in Devizes, and land called " Our Lady Bowre 
belonging to Our Lady Bowre Chapel, and also two parrqcks, parcel of 
the same Our Lady Bowre Chapel " in Bishops Cannings. The site of 
these Chapels does not seem to be known. 

Stonehenge. The Baptist Times and Freeman, Aug. 13th, 1909, has 
a long letter by Dr. John Clifford describing a visit to Stonehenge and 
Salisbury Plain, reprinted in Wiltshire Times, Aug. 21st, 1909. 

Tews at Marlborough and Wilton in the Thirteenth 

Century. An interesting note in Wiltshire Times, Aug. 21st, 1909. 

Mr. Sam Darling at Beckhampton. Article in Fry's 

Magazine for July by A. Sidney Gal trey, extracts from which are printed 
in Devizes Gazette, July 8th, 1909. 



350 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &e. 

Rev. George Webb, Rector of Bath and Bishop of 

Limerick. An interesting article by the Eev. C. W. Sbickle, 
F.S.A., in Proceedings of the Bath Nat. Hist, and Antiquarian Field 
Club, xi., 141 — 150, 1908 — 9, with reproduction of a portrait engraved 
by Thomas Slater. George Webb was born at Bromham, 1581, son of 
Hugh Webb, the Eector, who died 1597. Entered at University Coll., 
Oxon., gained a scholarship at Corpus Christi. Vicar of Steeple Ashton 
1605, married 17th June, 1606, Annie, d. of Robert Seager, of Bromham 
(b. 1589, died Nov. 17th, 1617, Monument in Bromham Church). 
He married, secondly, October 27th, 1618, Elizabeth, d. of Clement 
Browne, of Avington, Berks. Rector of Bath 16'21. Bishop of Limerick 
1634 — 1641. Died 1641 of gaol fever, having been imprisoned by the 
Papist rebels. Buried in St. Munchin's Churchyard, Limerick. He 
published many sermons. 

HarthaiU Park, the seat of Sir John Poynder Dickson-Poynder, Bart. 
Article in Country Life, August 7th, 1909, with thirteen excellent 
photographs of the extensions and architectural features of the gardens 
lately designed by Mr. H. A Peto. They are " The House and its 
Setting," " The Canal," " In the Garden House," "The Pergola and the 
Sundial," " The Way over (the Canal)," " Art and Nature (the Canal) " 
"The Loggia and the Bridge," " The South Lawn," "A Circular Rose 
Garden," " A copy of the Warwick Vase," " The Enclosure at the End 
of the South Terrace," "To the South Terrace,"" "The Gardener's 
Cottage. " 

"All CanuiUgS Estate. . . . 2606 acres . . . comprising 
almost the entire village of All Cannings . . . will be sold . . . 
by Messrs. Knight, Frank & Rutley ... at the Bear Hotel, Devizes 
. . . September 23rd, 1909." 

Sale particulars. Folio, pp. 36, 2nd Edition. Folding coloured plan 
in pocket of cover, and map of district on back of cover. Forty good 
photoprocess views of houses in the text, viz., Manor Farm ; Bridge 
House Farm ; Cliff Farm ; Chandler's Lane Farm ; South Farm ; 
Drewitt Cottage; and thirty-four views of cottages and houses in the 
village street and elsewhere. An excellent pictorial guide to the village, 
on the sale of Sir Christopher Furness's Wiltshire estates. 

" Steeple Langford, Stapleford, Berwick St. James, 
Winterbourne Stoke, and Maddington. Particulars 

of Sale . . . 7816 acres . . . forming the greater part of the 
villages of Steeple Langford, Stapleford, and Winterbourne Stoke, pro- 
ducing a gross income of about i'3,811 per annum . . . sold by 
Messrs. Knight, Frank, and Rutley ... at the White Hart Hotel, 
Salisbury . . . 21st and 22nd, September, 1909." 

Folio. 2nd Edition, pp. 59. Three coloured folding plans loose in 
pocket of cover and map of district on outside of cover. Good process 
views of Manor Farm, East Cliff Farm, Mill House and seventeen cottages 



Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 351 

in Steeple Langford ; Southington Farm, Pelican Inn, Manor Farm, 
White House and fourteen cottages in Stapleford ; Asserton and two 
cottages in Berwick St. James ; Hill Farm, Manor Farm, Bell Inn, and 
sixteen cottages in Winterbourne Stoke; Manor Farm, Lodge, and three 
cottages in Maddington. 

This finely-illustrated Sale Catalogue, together with that of All Can- 
nings, mentioned above, were prepared for the sale of Sir Christopher 
Furness's Wiltshire estates. Full accounts of the sale and the prices 
paid appeared in the county papers at the respective dates. 

Sir Isaac Pitmail The visit of the Phonographic and Shorthand 
Teachers and Writers Societies to the various buildings and sites 
connected with the life of Sir Isaac Pitman at Bath and Trowbridge 
is described at length in Wiltshire Times, Sept. 11th, 1909. 

The White Horses of Wiltshire, a series of notes with 

illustrations in The Wiltshire Times. Westbury, Aug. 28th; Alton, 
Sept. 4th ; Broad Hinton, Sept. 11 ; Cherhill, Sept. 18th ; Marlborough, 
Sept. 25th ; Broad Town, October 2nd, 1909. 

The Right Hon W. H. Long, PC, MP., at Eood Ashton. 

A long article in the series of "Celebrities at Home " in The World, 
reprinted in Wiltshire Times with a cut of Rood Ashton, June 26th, 1909. 

Salisbury. " The Haunch of Venison." The Wiltshire 

Times, July 2nd, 1909, had an interesting note on this old house and on 
pannelling and curious antique odds and ends found during recent 
repairs. 

Will of Thomas Bayley, of Trowbridge, clothman, 1543. 

Wiltshire Times, Sept. 4th, 1909. 

Dame Elizabeth Hungerford. a long letter of complaint of 

her treatment by her husband, Lord Hungerford, and of her imprison- 
ment by his orders in his castle of Hungerford, where she was being 
poisoned by his chaplain, printed in Wiltshire Times, Sept. 25th, Oct. 
16th, 1909. 

Sir John Dickson-Poynder, Bart., MP., D.S.O., at 

Hartham. A good article dealing with his family descent and 
his own career, among the " Celebrities at Home" in the World, reprinted 
in Wiltshire Times, July 10th, 1909, with a cut of Hartham ; also in 
Salisbury Journal of the same date. 

Wardour. No. xxii. of articles on " Picturesque Wiltshire " in Wiltshire 
Times, July 10th, 1909. 

Sir Giles Pole. A Petition to Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, for a 
writ of subpoena against " Styven Blage of Warminster," for refusing to 
carry out a contract for the supply of fish. Wiltshire Times, Oct. 16th, 
1909. 



352 Recent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets, Articles, &c. 

Avebliry FOIlt. A short article, with illustrations, in The Connoisseur, 
September, 1909, vol. xxv., p. 52, by H. St. G. Gray. 

Malmesbury, Westbury and Edington, Longleat. 

Notes on excursions of the Bath Field Club to these places in April, May 
and June, 1907, are given in their Proceedings, xi., pp. 189—194, 
1908-9. 

Salisbury, South Wilts and Blackmore Museum 

Annual meeting and report. Salisbury Journal, July 31st, 1909. 

Tlie FaStOl'al Staff presented to the Bishop of Salisbury for use in 
the Cathedral, by Canon Myers, is fully described in Salisbury Journal, 
October 30th, 1909. 

A Sermon preached in Salisbury Cathedral at the annual commemora- 
tion of Founders and Benefactors on November 3rd, 1909, by the Arch- 
deacon of Dorset, is printed in full in Salisbury Journal, Nov. 6th, 1909. 

A SemiOn preached in Salisbury Cathedral at the annual Schools 
Service, Oct. 27th, 1909, by Canon Pullibank, Text Ex., xii., 6, is 
printed in Salisbury Journal, October 30th, 1909. 

Fonthill and the Beckfoi'ds. A good article by Ed. Kite, in 
Wiltshire Advertiser, begun September 30th, 1909. 

Tom MOOre and FarSOn Bowles, and their Wiltshire Homes. 
Article by R. D. Gillman, in Wiltshire Advertiser, June 10th, 1909. 

The Home Circle at Longleat 200 Years ago. 

Bishop Ken at Poulshot Rectory. Notes in Wiltshire Advertiser, April 
8th, 1909. 

Robert Nicholas, Recorder of Devizes and M.P. Some. account of 
the Nicholas family is given in Wiltshire Advertiser, September 9th, 
1909. 

Devizes. Notes by E. Kite on various matters concerning Devizes in 
the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. Wiltshire Advertiser, September 
2nd, 1909. 

The Hills and the Vale, by Richard Jefferies. with 
an Introduction by Edward Thomas. London: 

Duckworth & Co. 3, Henrietta Street, Co vent Garden. 1909. 

8in. x 5£in., pp., including title, xxxi + 312. Price 6*. 

This book consists of three unpublished essays, "On choosing a Gun," 
" Skating," and " The Dawn," and of fifteen others reprinted from various 
magazines and papers which have not been before reprinted in other 
collections of Jefferies' writings. Mr. Thomas's Introduction is really 
an essay tracing at some length the course and growth of Jefferies' powers 
at a writer from his earliest work, represented here by the papers on 
" Marlborough Forest" and "Village Churches," written in 1875, to the 



Hooks and Articles 01/ Wiltshire Authors. 353 

dreamy mystical writing of his latest years, to which " Nature and 
Eternity " and " The Dawn " belong. Indeed the Editor claims that 
this volume contains, as no other single volume does, specimens of all 
the various stages of thought and expresssion through which Jefferies 
passed in the course of his literary life. In his appreciation of these 
progressive phases he ranks the latest as the highest, and discourses at 
some length on the " marks of the cosmic sense " and " cosmic conscious- 
ness " which it seems Jefferies was only on the way to attaining to at his 
death. 

In addition to those mentioned above, the essays included in this volume 
are "Birds of Spring," " The Opening of the Year," "Vignettes from 
Nature," " A King of Acres," " The Story of Swindon," " Unequal 
Agriculture," "Village Organization," "The Idle Earth," " After the 
County Franchise," " The Wiltshire Labourer," " On the Downs," and 
"The Sun and the Brook." The majority of these deal directly or in- 
directly with the life of North Wilts some twenty-five years ago. No 
one has ever known the Wiltshire farmer and the Wiltshire labourer 
better, and no one has ever described them so well as Richard Jefferies. 

Stouehenge and other British Stone Monuments 
Astronomically considered. By Sir Norman 

IiOCkyer, K.C.E. F.R.S. Macmillan. 1909. Second edition. 
9Jin. X 6in., pp. 499. Price 14*. net. 

In this edition some two hundred pages, giving an account of new 
investigations, are added to the book as it appeared at first in 1906. The 
author considers that the view " that our ancient monuments were built 
to observe and mark the rising and setting places of the heavenly bodies 
is now fully established." [For notice of the 1st Edition see Wilts 
Arch. Mag., xxxiv., 330, 448] . 



BOOKS AND ARTICLES BY WILTSHIRE AUTHORS. 
Rt Rev. John Wordsworth, D D Bishop of Salisbury. 

"Ordination "per saltum" and Home Reunion [I] The Precedents 
of 1610." Article (3J cols.), The Guardian, August 18th, 1909. 

— — " Ordination Problems." S.P.C.K. : London. 1909. 2s. 

Visitation Addresses, 1909. I. — Organic History of the 

Church of England and its Proposed Dismemberment. Salisbury 
Diocesan Gazette, June, 1909, pp. 110 — 116. II. — Home Reunion. 
Ibid, July, 1909, pp. 126 — 133. III. — Liturgical Revision. Ibid, August, 
1909, pp. 142—147. IV.— The Roman Church and Christian Unity. 
Ibid, September, 1909, pp. 162—169. V.— The Visit to Germany. Ibid, 
October, 1909, pp. 179—184. Also in Salisbury Journal, July 10, 1909. 
VI. — Visit to Sweden of the Commission appointed by the Archbishop 
of Canterbury, under Resolution 74 of the Lambeth Conference. An 



354 Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors. 

address delivered to the Conference of Dean, Archdeacons, and Rural 
Deans, 2nd November, 1909. Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, November, 
1909, pp. 199—207. 

Kit. ReV. Allan Becher Webb, D.D., late Dean of Salis- 
bury, "The Kingdom of Christ upon Earth," with preface by Canon 
Body. 

Large cr. 8vo. cloth, bevelled boards. London, 1909. Price 3*. Gd. 
net. 

"With Christ in Paradise." 6th edition, 12mo., cloth. 

Price 1*. 

The Dean of Salisbury (W. Page Roberts). An address 

on " Heredity " delivered at a meeting of the Salisbury branch of the 
Parents' National Educational Union, at Salisburj', is printed in full in 
Salisbury Journal, May 8th, 1909. 

Sermon preached at Salisbury Cathedral at the Infirmary 

anniversary service, September 28th, 1909, Text, Gen. iv., 9, is printed 
in full in Salisbury Journal, Oct. 2nd, 1909. 

Sermon preached at Salisbury Cathedral, July 4th, 1909, 

on "Darwin," Text, I. Kings, iv., 33, and Job, xxviii., 28, printed at 
length in Salisbury Journal, July 10th, 1909. 

Maurice Hewlett (of Broad Chalke). " The Spanish Jade. AVith 
full-page coloured illustrations by William Hyde. Cassell & Company, 
Limited, London, Paris, New York, and Toronto. MCMVIII." 
Cloth, cr. 8vo., four illustrations, pp. xii. -f 320. 

— — "Beckwith's Fairy." Short story in Scribner's Mag., 

August, 1909, vol. xlvi., pp. 129—140. Story of a clerk in the Wilts & . 
Dorset Bank at Salisbury, living at Wishford, who found a' Fairy near 
Wilsford House in 1889, and kept it in a dog kennel at Wishford ! 

" Letters to Sanchia," begun in the Fortnightly Beview, 

July, 1909. 

A. S. Maskelyne. " Feudal Aids, with other Documents in the Public 
Record Office, A.D. 1284—1431. Vol. V., Stafford -Worcester. Prepared 
by the Deputy Keeper of the Records." Eyre & Spottiswoode, for His 
Majesty's Stationery Office. 1909. Price 15*. 
Noticed, Guardian, September 22nd, 1909. 

Mr. A. S. Maskelyne also completed the Index to " Close Rolls in the 
Reign of Henry III., A.D. 1234-1237, from the Record Office." 1909. 

ReV. G. H. Ellglelieai't F.SA., of Little Clarendon, Dinton. 

" The Roman Villa at Hemsworth." Paper in Proceedings of Dorset 

Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club, xxx., p. 1. 1909. 

Plan and four process plates ; pp. 12. 



: 



Books and Articles ly Wiltshire Authors. 355 

Rev. T. J. Lawrence (Rector of Upton Lovel). "Handbook of 
International Law." London: Macmillan. 1909. Seventh Edition, 
with much new matter. Price 3s. 

The sixth edition was published in 1907. 

Pamela Teima3.lt. An article in Spectator, May 29th, 1909, on a 
caravanning journey — with her children — from Lulworth through Dorset 
and Wilts, by Hindon and Wylye to Amesbury, &c. 

Stephen Reynolds (of Devizes), " The Holy Mountain." London : 
John Lane, the Bodley Head. 1909. Cr. 8vo. 

The scene of this book is largely laid at Devizes, the " Trowbury " of 
the book. 

Reviewed at length, somewhat unfavourably, Devizes Gazette October 
7th, 1909. 

P. A. S- Locke, of Bristol, s. of the late Wadham Locke, of Cleeve 
House, Seend, is the writer of the Songs in " Savage and other Songs," 
illustrated by A. Wilde Parsons, published by Ed. Everard, Broad St. 
Bristol. 1909. Price 2s. 6d. 

Noticed, Wiltshire Gazette, Nov. 25th, 1909. 

Rev. Douglas Macleane. "Our Island Church," by Douglas 
Macleane, M.A., sometime Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, Proctor 
in Convocation. London. 1909. George Allen and Sons. 2s. 6d. 
pp. 249. A series of twelve essays on the history of the Church. 
Noticed, Salisbury Diocesan Gazette, September, 1909. 

ReV. R. E. Thomas (of Salisbury). Paper on " Darwinism," read 
at meeting of the Salisbury Microscopical Society, printed in Salisbury 
Journal, May 15th, 1909. 

W. G. Collins, of Bradford-on-Avon, (and T. C. Cantrill, F.G.S.). 
Article on " Solisbury Hill Camp, near Bath," with a good description of 
the camp and objects found in it. Antiquary, September, November, 
and December, 1909. N. S. V. 326—331, 419—424, 451—456, with a 
report on a skull from Solisbury Hill by Dr. J. Beddoe, F.R.S., as an 
appendix. 

Earl NelSOn. The Introduction to " A Genealogical History of the 
Nelson Family. By Thomas Nelson. Illustrated. King's Lynn : Thew 
& Son. 1908." Demy 4to., pp. 68 + xxx. + 11. 7s. &d. 

R. D. Gillman. " Spring Time in Portugal," a series of articles in 
Wiltshire Advertiser, May 6th, 13th, 27th, June 3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th, 
July 1st, 8th, 15th, 29th, and August 19th, 1909. 

Rev. P. W. G. Filleul, Rector of Devizes. His first Sermon 
preached at St. John's Church. Printed in full, Wiltshire Advertiser, 
September 9th, 1909. 



356 Wiltshire Illustrations and Pictures. 



WILTSHIRE ILLUSTRATIONS AND PICTURES. 

Original Drawings by C. E. Ponting, F.S.A., exhibited at Royal Academy, 

1909, Nos. 1413, 1566, " Lyte's Cary, Restoration," "Christ Church, 

Shaw, Wilts." 
Wilts County Miniature Rifle Association. Prize Meeting at Chippenham. 

Two Cuts. Wiltshire Times, July 24th, 1909. 
West Wilts Unionists' Fete at Trowbridge. Two cuts. Wiltshire Times, 

July 31st, 1909. 
Group of Artillerymen injured in Explosion at Trowbridge. Wiltshire Times, 

July 24th, 1909. 
Territorials on Salisbury Plain : — Patney, Detraining Artillery ; Patney Rest 

Camp, the Canteen ; Leaving Patney ; Lavington, London Scottish 

Pipers, and three other photos. Wiltshire Times, August 7th, 1909. 

London Yeomanry near Pond Farm, Artillery, &e. Three cuts. Wiltshire 

Times, August 14th, 1909. 
Salisbury, the Choir House in the Close. A number of photographic illus- 
trations and measured drawings, in The Architectural Review, Oct., 1908. 
Roundway. Plan of proposed new Golf Links on Roundway Hill, near 

Devizes ; and five process cuts of Yeomanry in training on Salisbury 

Plain. Wiltshire Advertiser, June 3rd, 1909. 
(Wishford Oak Apple Day). "The Old Ladies with wood from Grovely." 

Salisbury Times, June 4th, 1909. 
" Tidworth, Officers' Quarters," and three photos of Troops at Church Parade. 

Wiltshire Times, June 19th, 1909. 
Longleat (the Front), the Hall, and the Saloon, The Prince and Princess 

passing through Warminster, four good photos in Wiltshire Times, 

June 26th, 1909, with an account of the visit of the Prince and Princess 

of Wales to Longleat, on June 21st. 
Ramsbury Church. Tower Screen proposed to be erected as a memorial of 

the one thousandth anniversary of the consecration of the first Bishop of 

Ramsbury. Appeal. 
Melksham. New Liberal Club. Wiltshire Times, July 3rd, 1909. 
Avebury. Blackbird's nest in chalk silting of ditch, with note by H. St. G. 

Gray. The Queen, August 21st, 1909, p. 360. 
Salisbury Cathedral. Brass of Bishop Wyville. The Old Time Parson, by 

P. H. Ditchfield, 1908, p. 44. 
The " Robber Stones " at Gore Cross and Chitterne Down. Good Photos, 

with short account of the death of Benjamin Colclough on Chitterne 

Down when being pursued after robbing Mr. Dean, of Imber, Oct. 31st, 

1839. Wiltshire Times, Sept., 25th, 1909. 
Christchurch, Shaw. Drawing by C. E. Ponting, F.S.A., exhibited at Royal 

Academy, 1909. 
Chippenham. The Old Town Hall. With letterpress account of it. Wilt- 
shire Times, Nov. 20th, 1909. 



Wiltshire Portraits. 357 



WILTSHIEE POKTRAITS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Linzey, Mr. and Mrs. E. Chapman, of Hilperton and 

Trowbridge, John W. Hall, of Warminster, died May 26th, 1909. 

Wiltshire Times, June 5th, 1909. 
F. V. Monk, of Salisbury, winner of the Marathon Eace, with notice of his 

career. Salisbury Times, June 4th, 1909. 
Lady Dickson-Poynder. The Lady's Realm, June, p. 156 ; Tatler, July 

21st, 1909. 
The Countess of Pembroke. Good portrait. Ladies' Field, June 26th, 1909. 
Marchioness of Ripon. Tatler, July 21st, 1909. 
Miss Henrietta Madeleine Clutterbuck (Mrs. Christian) and Mr. Bertram 

Christian. Wiltshire Times, August 28th, 1909. 
The County Cricket Team. Wiltshire Times, Sept. 4th, 1909. 
Et Hon. W. H. Long. Wiltshire Times, Sept. 18, 1909. 
George Herbert. Eeproduction of the engraved portrait in the 1674 edition 

of " The Temple," in The Old Time Parson, by P. H. Ditchfield, 1908, 

p. 114. 
Eobert Chaloner Critchley Long. Wiltshire Times, Oct. 2nd, 1909. 
Miss Mary Hope Letitia Clutterbuck, d. of Mr. E. H, Clutterbuck, of Harden- 

huish, and Capt. Eonald Henry Greig, D.S.O., Eoyal Engineers, s. of 

Lt.-Col. B. E. Greig, formerly of Chippenham. Wiltshire Times, Oct. 

16th, 1909. 
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac J. Watkins, of Dilton Marsh. Wiltshire Times, Oct. 

23rd, 1909. 
Eev. C. G. Hutchinson, minister of Emmanuel Baptist Chapel, Trowbridge. 

Wiltshire Times, Nov. 6th, 1909. 
Charles Bathurst, Unionist candidate for South Wilts. Salisbury Journal, 

Oct. 30th, 1909. 
Wiltshire Mayors. W. Croft (Chippenham) ; W. H. Lawson (Swindon) ; 

E. H. Henley (Calne) ; F. Shepherd (Salisbury) ; E. J. Hill (Marl- 

borough) ; G. Bell (Wilton) ; J. Moore (Malmesbury). Wiltshire 

Times, Nov. 13th, 1909. . 
Miss Chinty Lockwood (Mrs. Chandos de Paravicini) d. of W. R. P. Lockwood, 

of Cottles House, Atworth. Full-page portrait. Country Life, Nov. 13th ; 

Ladies' Field, Nov. 27th, 1909. 
Arthur Cecil Tyrrell Beck, Liberal candidate for North- West Wilts. Wiltshire 

Times, Dec. 4th, 1909. 
R. Hill, of Devizes. Portrait with obit, notice. Wiltshire Advertiser, May 

27th, 1909. 



358 Additions to Museum and Library. 

ADDITIONS TO MUSEUM AND LIBRARY. 
Museum. 

Presented by Rev. E. H. Goddard : Flint Arrowhead from Clyffe Pypard. 
,, ,, Me. E. LI. Gwillim: Large Medieval Earthenware Water 

Pot found in the Sewage Works at St. Margaret's Mead, 

Marlborough. 
,, ,, Rev. H. G. 0. Kendall : Six Fragments of broken ground 

Flint Celts from Windmill Hill, Avebury. 
„ ,, Messrs. W. Eales, C. D. Heginbothom, W. F. Trumper, and 

E. Cook : Specimens of Wiltshire Lepidoptera. 
„ „ Mr. W. F. Trumper : Wiltshire Eggs. 
,, ,, Mr. Giles Chivebs : A Gauffering Iron complete. 
Deposited on loan by Mr. J. W. Kingston k : White Tailed Eagle killed at 

Marden, 1909. 

Library. 

Presented by The Earl of Pembroke : " Survey of the Lands of William, 
First Earl Pembroke. Transcribed from the Vellum Rolls 
in the possession of the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery 
with an introduction by the transcriber, C. R. Straton, 
F.R.C.S., F.E.S., and a preface by the Earl of Pembroke and 
Montgomery. Oxford : printed privately for presentation to | 
the members of the Roxburgh Club, 1909." 2 vols. 

,, „ The Rev. C. S. Ruddle : List of and Monthly Pay List of the] 
Durrington Volunteers 1798, 1799. Estate Sale Catalogue j 
and other papers. 

,, ,, The author, A. G. Bradley : " Wiltshire " in the "Cambridge] 
County Geographies " series, 1909. 

„ „ Rev. W. S. Sykes : MS. Notes on the History of the Parish ofj 
Wilcot. MS. extracts from the Day Book of S. Beaven, oflj 
Semington, 1778. 

„ „ Mb. A. Bowker : " King Alfred Millenary, 1902." 

,, ,, Me. H. E. Medlicott : Two illustrated Sale Particulars. 

„ „ The author, A. Schombebg : "Some Notes on the Stokes^ 
Family," 1909. 

,, „ Me. J. E. P. Falconer: Drawing of flint implements. 

,, ,, Canon Chr. Wordsworth : Photograph of document appro-i 
priating seats in Corsley Church. 

,, ,, The author, Miss M. F. Davies : " Life in an English village,!] 
an Economic and Historical Survey of the Parish of Corsley, 
in Wiltshire, 1909." 

„ ,, The Pbopeietob of the Wiltshire Times: The Paper for 1909. 

,, „ Mr. E. O. P. Bouveeie : Wiltshire Advertiser for 1909. 

,, „ Rev. C. V. Goddaed ; Salisbury Journal for 1909. 

C. H. Woodward, Printer and Publisher, i, Saint John Street, Devizes. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 



ON 



ANCIENT EARTHWORKS AND 
FORTIFIED ENCLOSURES, 

Prepared for presentation to the Congress of 
Archczological Societies, July ytk, 1909. 



COMMITTEE. 



Lord Balcarres, M.P., F.S.A. {Chairman). 



Mr. A. Hadrian Alltcroft, M. A. 
Mr. W. J. Andrew, F.S.A. 
Col. F. W. T. Attree, F.S.A. 
Mr. C. H. Bothamley, F.I.C. 
Mr. J. G. N. Clift. 
Mr. E. S. Cobbold, C.E., F.G.S. 
Mr. S. Denison. 

Mr. WlLLOUGHBY GARDNER. 

Mr. A. R. Goddard, B.A. 
Professor F. Haverfield, M.A., 
F.S.A. 



Mr. W. H. St. John Hope, M.A. 
Mr. H. Laver, F.S.A. 
Mr. C. Lynam, F.S.A. 
Mr. D. H. Montgomerie. 
Mr. C. H. Read, LL.D., P.S.A. 
Mr. J. Horace Round, LL.D. 
Col. O. E. Ruck, F.S.A. Scot. 
Mr. W. M. Tapp, LL.D., F.S.A. 
PresidentB.C.A.WiNDLE,F.R.S. 



Mr. A. G. Chater, Hon. Sec. 
{Address : 41, Porchester Square, London, W.) 



The Committee is able to report a steady growth of interest in ancient 
fortifications, as shown by measures taken for the preservation, explora- 
tion and recording of these remains. It has to be noticed, however, 
that many large areas (such as Buckinghamshire, Norfolk and Surrey, 
to name only three counties), are still comparatively neglected ; and it 
will not be out of place to insist once more on the value of local effort 
in the systematic recording of these relics, as the first step towards their 
preservation and investigation. 

A Royal Commission on Welsh Monuments was appointed in 
August, 1908, and has been for several months engaged on its inventory. 

In October, 1908, the Government appointed a Royal Commission 
to make an inventory of the Ancient and Historical Monuments of 
England, and to specify those which seem most worthy of preservation. 
A Sub-Commission to deal with earthworks and pre-Roman remains has 
been constituted as follows : Lord Balcarres (Chairman), Sir H. H. 
Howorth, Professor Haverfield, Mr. J. G. N. Clift, with Mr. William 
Page and Mr. A. G. Chater as Assistant Commissioners. Mr. D. H. 
Montgomerie is assisting the Commission as investigator of earthworks. 

The county of Hertford is now being surveyed, and other counties 
will follow in turn. 

It will be seen that the Sub-Commission is closely associated with 
the Earthworks Committee of the Congress, and in view of this fact 
is suggested that the county archaeological societies might render 
valuable assistance to the Royal Commission by collecting information 
and preparing schedules (especially in those counties that have not yet 
Deen dealt with in the Victoria County History), which would supple- 
ment and correct the Ordnance Survey and serve as a basis for the 
schedules of the Royal Commission. 

It is gratifying to announce that the Hampshire Field Club has 
already reported that a schedule of the earthworks of the county is 
being prepared by one of its members, Dr. J. P. Williams-Freeman, and 
that a preliminary list of the earthworks of Cheshire has been furnished 
by Mr. William Harrison (see Bibliography). The Committee is also 



informed that Mr. Percy Farrer, of Durrington, Wilts., has under- 
taken to schedule the earthworks of a part of Wiltshire, including 
Salisbury Plain. 

It is hoped that these examples may be widely followed, and that 
the appointment of the Royal Commission may serve to stimulate the 
work of recording for which this Committee was originally constituted. 

The officers in charge of the revision of the Ordnance Survey on the 
scale of 25 inches to the mile have agreed to keep the Committee 
informed of the position of their field parties, in order that any earth- 
works hitherto omitted or insufficiently shown may be made good in the 
next revision. This information will be forwarded to the Secretaries of 
the local societies concerned, and the Committee trusts that advantage 
will be taken of this practical arrangement for mutual assistance 
between the Ordnance Survey and the Archaeological Societies. 

The Committee is now in correspondence with the Commission 
d'etude des Enceintes prehistoriques et Fortifications anhistoriques, a 
development of the Societe Prehistorique de France which during the 
last three years has collected a great quantity of material for an 
inventory of the ancient fortifications of France. We take this oppor- 
tunity of mentioning that the President of the French Committee, 
Dr. Adrien Guebhard, A.F.M. (4, Rue de l'Abbe de l'Epee, Paris), 
will be glad to exchange reprints with the authors of any papers relating 
to our subject. 

We have again to thank the Victoria History Syndicate for the 
presentation of the original plans of earthworks reproduced in the 
volumes of the History. 

PRESERVATION.— The transfer of Maiden Castle, Dorset, to 
the guardianship of H.M. Office of Works has now been completed, 
and it is understood that steps will be taken to check the destruction of 
the ramparts by rabbits. 

Thetford Castle Meadow and Hill, Norfolk, have been leased by 
Thetford Corporation for ninety-nine years, and the site was formally 
opened as a public park on September 5th, 1908, by Lady William 
Cecil, the lessor. 

Stokeleigh Camp, on the Somerset side of the Avon gorge, has, 
through the generosity of Mr. G. A. Wills, been saved from destruction, 



and secured to the public. Besides purchasing the camp and the 
surrounding woods, Mr. Wills has provided a fund for the maintenance 
of the site in its present natural state ; and it is understood that the 
property will be vested in the National Trust for Places of Historic 
Interest or Natural Beauty. 

White Barrow, near Tilshead, Wilts., one of the chief long barrows 
of the county, has been acquired by the National Trust, the owner of 
the property, Mrs. Cunnington, of Devizes, herself contributing part of 
the purchase price, and the remainder having been raised by subscrip- 
tion. Mrs. Cunnington reserves to herself and her husband the right to 
excavate the barrow. 

Mr. Claude E. S. Bishop, of Norton Priory, near Chichester, has 
recently purchased the remains of an earthwork adjoining the old church 
at Selsea with a view to its preservation. 

The Essex County Council has voted a sum of money for the pur- 
pose of restoring the old landmarks of Epping Forest. 

Pendinas Camp, Cardiganshire, has been protected by the owners 
and by the Corporation of Aberystwyth, certain public paths to the 
summit having been wired off. 

DESTRUCTION. — Many instances have been noticed of the 
mutilation of ramparts and ditches through the utilization of ancient 
earthworks in the laying out of golf courses. This practice is evidently 
on the increase, and the Committee would urge archaeologists and all 
who recognize the importance of these relics to use their influence 
whenever possible to prevent such destruction, which is doubtless due 
in most cases to ignorance of the scientific value and historical interest 
of the remains. 

Buckinghamshire. — Prince's Risborough.— A small portion of 
the reputed site of the Black Prince's palace has been added to the 
churchyard adjoining, and the moat on that side has been filled in. 

Carnarvonshire. — Penmaenmawr. — Mr. Willoughby Gardner 
reports that quarrying has recently extended considerably in the direction 
of this hill fortress, and that blast holes have actually been drilled 
beneath the north wall of the stronghold. He reported the matter to 
the Royal Commission on Welsh Monuments, and two of the 
Commissioners have been to view the site. It is feared, however, that 



the remains cannot easily be saved, the Quarry Company having been 
granted a lease of the mountain by the Commissioners of Woods and 
Forests. 

Conway Mountain. —Mr. Gardner reports that the walls 



of the hill fortress here were sadly mutilated last year by Territorials 
entrenching themselves behind them during manoeuvres. This was 
brought to the notice of the Conway Town Council by the Llandudno 
Field Club, the Nant Conwy Antiquarian Society and the Abergele 
Antiquarian Society acting in concert, and the Council at once 
instructed their surveyor to erect notice boards around the site, putting 
it " out of bounds " for troops. 

Devonshire. — A cairn a few yards south of the high road on 
Wigford Down, Meavy, and some hut circles near Petertavy have been 
destroyed by road menders. A complaint has been lodged with the 
Tavistock District Council by the Devonshire Association. 

Hertfordshire. — Mr. W. B. Gerish writes that the tumulus at 
Metley Hill, Wallington, has been levelled comparatively recently, and 
a large moated site near Shingle Hall, Sawbridgeworth, has been 
levelled and the moat filled in. 

Suffolk. — Bungay Castle. — Mr. W. A. Dutt writes that portions 
of the rampart that enclosed the base court have been damaged in 
enlarging the Town Yard, where road metal is stored, but so far as can 
be ascertained nothing further in that direction is likely to be done. 
The Castle ruins, chiefly standing on a walled mound, were sold some 
years ago by the Duke of Norfolk, but it is understood that they have 
since been repurchased by him. 

EXPLORATION.— Cambridgeshire.— The line of the Roman 
road between Cambridge and Barton was cut through by the Cambridge 
Antiquarian Society and plans made of the cutting. 

The site of a levelled tumulus at Barton was excavated by the same 
Society, and last year the Rev. F. G. Walker examined two tumuli of 
the Roman period at the same place. 

Carmarthenshire. — The Carmarthenshire Antiquarian Society has 
excavated a tumulus of the middle or late Bronze Age on Cadno 
Mountain, near Pendine. (See Bibliography — Ward.) 



The same Society has investigated the site of the Roman 
settlement at Dolaucothy. (See Bibliography — Haverfield!) 

Cheshire. — The south-east angle of the Roman defences of 
Chester was examined last year by the Liverpool Committee for 
Research in Wales and the Marches. (See The Times, Jan. 8th, 1909.) 

Dorset. — Maumbury Ring, Dorchester. — Excavations were 
carried out here in September, 1908, by a committee of the British 
Archaeological Association and the Dorset Field Club, the work being 
under the superintendence of Mr. H. St. George Gray. Interesting 
details were revealed inside the entrance, and the floor of the arena 
was uncovered at several points. A cutting in the western bank 
resulted in the discovery at the foot of the bank of a shaft 30 feet 
deep, containing prehistoric relics. It is proposed to continue the 
work in the early autumn. (See Bibliography — Gray.) 

Hemsworth, near Wimborne. — The Roman villa has 

been excavated under the supervision of the Rev. G. H. Engleheart, 
F.S.A., and Mr. H. Le Jeune. 

Essex. — Red Hills. — The excavations carried out by the Red 
Hills Committee during the autumn of 1908 dealt with sites in the 
parish of Goldhanger. (See Bibliography — Reader.) 

Hampshire. — Silchester. — Work in 1908 extended from May to 
December, under the supervision of Mr. Mill Stephenson, F.S.A. With 
last year's excavations was completed the systematic exploration of the 
whole of the 100 acres enclosed by the town wall. The remains of the 
east gate (first uncovered in 1872) were again laid bare and compared 
with those of the west gate, examined in 1890; the two gates are of 
similar plan and of the same date. Investigations are now being carried 
out to ascertain the exact nature and date of the outer defences, and a 
series of cuttings will be made through the encircling ditches. 

Bournemouth. — Some barrows have been opened in the 

Talbot Woods, under the supervision of Mr. W. de C. Prideaux, of 
Weymouth. 

Herefordshire. — Some trenches have been cut by the Woolhope 
Naturalists' Field Club on the site of the Roman station of Magni, near 
Hereford, and the Roman road near Abbeydore station has been 
further investigated by the same Society. 



Lancashire. — In April, 1909, an interment circle on Banniside, 
Coniston, was excavated by Mr. W. G. Collingwood, F.S.A. A report 
will be printed in the next volume of the Transactions of the Cumberland 
and Westmorland Archaeological Society. 

London. — In the spring of this year the Society of Antiquaries 
conducted an excavation on the site of Christ's Hospital, under the 
direction of Mr. Philip Norman, LL.D., and Mr. Francis W. Reader, 
with the object of finding remains of the angle bastion of the City 
Wall, where the latter after running due west turned southwards in the 
direction of Newgate. A considerable portion of the north side of the 
bastion was uncovered, together with a piece of the City Wall. The 
latter showed Roman masonry of the same character as in other parts 
of the wall that have been examined; and the bastion proved to be 
of later date than the wall itself. This was also a feature of the 
undoubtedly Roman bastion found under the vestry of All Hallows, 
London Wall. Signs of an external ditch were looked for, but the 
indications were those of a running stream at the foot of the wall. 

Monmouthshire. — Caerwent. — Excavations were resumed in 
June, 1908, and continued till October. The chief discovery of the 
year was an interesting temple to the east of the Forum, of which the 
ground-plan is nearly perfect. A whole block of houses and shops 
situated to the east of the Forum and on the north side of the high 
road was excavated. Operations this year are being continued further 
north, near the Amphitheatre. 

Caerleon. — The Liverpool Committee for Research in 



Wales and the Marches has been conducting excavations on the site 
of this legionary fortress, in co-operation with the Caerleon and 
Monmouthshire Antiquarian Association. The southern angle of the 
defences has been examined, and very interesting results are being 
obtained from the excavation of the amphitheatre, known as " King 
Arthur's Round Table." A preliminary account of the work is given 
in The Times, July 9, 1909. 

Montgomeryshire. — Caersws. — The Liverpool Committee for 
Research in Wales is excavating this Roman fort, under the direction of 
Professor R. C. Bosanquet, F.S.A. , and in conjunction with the 
Powysland Club. The defences consisted of a clay rampart faced with 



8 

stone. A short notice of the work will be found in The Times, July 9, 
1909. It is expected that in a short time the same Committee will 
explore the camp at Cefn Caer, six miles from Aberdovey. 

Norfolk. — Burgh-next-Aylsham. — Excavations were carried out 
last year by Mr. Walter Rye on the moated site of the Old Hall. (See 
Bibliography— Clarke?) 

Northumberland. — Corbridge. — The excavations on the site of 
Corstopitum were resumed in July last and continued till October, under 
the supervision of Mr. R. H. Forster. The buildings uncovered 
included two large granaries, and part of a structure of great extent and 
evident importance, much of which lay outside the area reserved for 
excavation last year. The most important find of the year was a hoard 
of 48 gold coins in splendid condition. (See Bibliography — Knowles 
and Forster.) 

Somerset. — Meare. — Trial explorations were conducted at the 
Lake Village last year by Messrs. Arthur Bulleid and H. St. George 
Gray (see Bibliography). It is expected that a good deal of work will 
take place on this site next season. 

Norton Camp, near Taunton. — A cutting was made in 

July, 1908, in the fosse of this camp by the Somerset Archaeological 
Society, under the direction of Mr. H. St. George Gray. The evidence 
showed that the camp was constructed during the Bronze Age and 
considerably used during the Romano- British period. (See Bibliography 
— Gray.) 



Lansdown. — In May last explorations of two barrows on 

the north-east slope of Lansdown were carried out by Mr. Thos. S. Bush. 

Charterhouse-on-Mendip. — In connection with the 



Somersetshire Archaeological Society's Wells meeting in July, Mr. H. 
St. George Gray has been conducting excavations on the site of what 
appears to be a small amphitheatre near the Roman lead mines, but the 
work had to be temporarily abandoned on account of bad weather. 
Roman construction of the earthwork is proved, and Mr. Gray has made 
a plan of the area with 6-inch contours. 

Surrey. — Leigh Hill, Cobham. — The excavations mentioned in 
last year's report have now been concluded. (See Bibliography — Smith.) 



Sussex. — The Brighton and Hove Archaeological Club has under- 
taken trial excavations on the three sites mentioned below, under the 
direction of its honorary secretary, Mr. Herbert S. Toms. 

Botolph Mounds, near Bramber. — A preliminary 



exploration produced no remains earlier than the mediaeval period. A 
further examination is contemplated. 

Hollingbury Camp. — Trial holes sunk in the fosse of 






this camp determined the position of the original entrances. 

The Graves of the Devil and his Wife, or Giants' 



Graves. — A cutting was made in August, 1908, in the rampart and 
ditch of this valley entrenchment on the floor of the Devil's Dyke 
combe. The question of date has still to be settled. 

Westmorland. — Ewe Close, Crosby Ravensworth. — Further 
explorations of this Romano-British settlement were carried out in 
September last by the Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeological 
Society, under the supervision of Mr. W. G. Collingwood, F.S.A. (See 
Bibli ography — Collingwood. ) 

Wiltshire. — Knap Hill, Alton Priors. — Excavations of this 
camp were begun last year by Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Cunnington, and 
resumed this year. Some notes on the results have already appeared 
(see Bibliography — Cunnington), and a fuller report is promised. 

Avebury. — The excavations of the British Association were 

resumed in April under the direction of Mr. H. St. George Gray, and have 
established the fact that an entrance causeway of solid chalk existed on 
the south side of the enclosure. An account of this year's work appeared 
in The Times, May 21 and June 3, 1909, and it is hoped to resume 
operations next spring. 

Yorkshire. — Elslack, near Skipton. — The Yorkshire Archaeo- 
logical Society is carrying out excavations at Burwen Castle, the site of 
a Roman fort of about 5^ acres, under the direction of Mr. Thomas 
May, F.S.A.Scot., who succeeded Mr. F. Gerald Simpson. The position 
of the stone walls of the fort has been determined, and the remains of an 
earlier fortification with a clay rampart, directly in rear of the later stone 
wall, have been clearly made out. One of the gateways of the earlier 
rampart, constructed of wood, is now (June) in course of excavation, 



IO 



and several of the stumps where the ramparts abut on the gateway 
have been discovered in situ. The finds of pottery and coins extend 
from the end of the first to the late fourth century. The thanks of 
archaeologists are due to Mr. George Lane Fox, M.P., the owner of the 
site, who has offered every facility for its exploration. 

Castleshaw. — Further excavations on the site of this 



Roman camp took place last year. Their resumption this year has 
been hindered owing to the Oldham Corporation having scheduled the 
site in a Water Bill. It is hoped that the work so successfully begun 
by Mr. S. Andrew and Major W. Lees may be soon resumed and 
carried to a conclusion. Meanwhile the site appears to be suffering 
from neglect. 

Two tumuli at Reighton, near Speeton, have been opened by Mr. T. 
Sheppard, of the Hull Municipal Museum, but the results have not yet 
been published. 

Ailcy Hill, Ripon. — Digging operations were conducted 



here in June by Mr. McCall, editor of the Yorkshire Archaeological 
Journal, and some students of the Bishop's Clergy College. The soil 
is believed to be full of human bones buried promiscuously ; but on the 
north-east shoulder of the mound four or five entire skeletons were 
found near the surface, and appear to represent battle-burials. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. — Since the last report was issued chapters 
on earthworks have been published in the following volumes of the 
Victoria County History 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE (Vol. II.) By George Clinch. 

HEREFORDSHIRE (Vol. I.) ... Compiled by the late 

I. Chalkley Gould, 
principally from plans 
and notes by the Rev. 
E. A. Downman. 

,, „ ... Offa's Dike in Hereford- 

shire, by James G. 
Wood. 

RUTLAND (Vol. I.) By Reginald A. Smith. 



II 

Amongst other literary matter bearing on the subject of earthworks 
may be noticed : 

Allcroft (A. Hadrian). — " Earthwork of England : Prehistoric, 
Roman, Saxon, Danish, Norman and Mediaeval." 
(Macmillan, 1908.) A complete text-book of the subject, 
illustrated with 225 plans, etc. 

Andrew (W. J.).— "The Stone Circles of Derbyshire." (In 
" Memorials of Old Derbyshire," Bemrose and Sons.) 

Bulleid (Arthur) and Gray (H. St. George). " The Lake Village 
at Meare, 1908." (Brit. Assoc. Report, 1908.) 

Bush (T. S.). — Report on Explorations on Lansdown, May, 
June and September, 1908. 

Bushell (Rev. W. Done).— "The Stone Circles of Pembroke- 
shire." (Archseologia Cambrensis, 6th Sen, Vol. IX, 
Part 2.) 

Capper (Col. J. E.). — Two Photographs of Stonehenge from a 
War Balloon. (Archseologia, Vol. LX, PI. 69 and 70.) 

Clarke (W. G.).— " Thetford Castle Hill." (Norfolk Archaeology, 
Vol. XVI.) 

" Some Recent Finds in Norfolk." Contains a section 

on the discoveries at Burgh-next-Aylsham. (Norfolk 
Antiq. Misc., N.S., Vol. I, Part 3.) 

"Norfolk in Prehistoric Times." Contains notes on 

dykes and other earthworks. (Antiquary, Vol. XLV, 
1909.) 

" An Old-Time Picture of the Fens." With note on an 

alleged Roman camp in the Fens. (Antiquary, 
Vol. XLV, 1909.) 

Clinch (George). — "Suggestions for a Scheme of Classification 
of the Megalithic and Analogous Remains of Great 
Britain and Ireland." (Annals of Archaeology and 
Anthropology, Vol. II, No. 1.) 

Cocks (A. H.). — "Prehistoric Pit-dwellings at Ellesborough." 
(Records of Bucks., Vol. IX, 1908.) 



12 



Collingwood (W. G.). — "Report on further Exploration of the 
Romano-British Settlement at Ewe Close, Crosby Ravens- 
worth, Westmorland." (Trans. Cumb. and Westm. A. and 
A. Soc, N.S., Vol. IX.) 

Cunnington (Mrs. M. E.). — " On a Remarkable Feature in the 
Entrenchments of Knap Hill Camp, Wilts." (Man, 
1909, No. 28.) 

" Notes on a Barrow of the Bronze Age at Oliver's 

Camp." (The Reliquary, Vol. XIV, 1908.) 



" Notes on a Late-Celtic Rubbish Heap, near Oare, 

Wilts." (Wilts. Arch. Magazine, Vol. XXXVI.) 

Curwen (J. F.). — " Brough Castle." (Trans. Cumb. and Westm. 
A. and A. Soc, N.S., Vol. IX.) 

Dutt (W. A.). — " Some Recent Discoveries at Burgh Castle." 
(Antiquary, Vol. XLV, 1909.) 

Forster (R. H.), and others. — " Corstopitum : Report of the 
Excavations in 1907." (Archseol. /Eliana, 3rd Ser., 
Vol. IV.) 

Fryer (J. C. F.), and Keynes (G. L.).— "A Late Roman 
Settlement near Smersham." (Proc. Cambridge Ant. 
Soc, Vol. XI, Part 3.) 

Graham (T. H. B.).— " Six Extinct Cumberland Castles." Has 
notices of earthworks now or formerly existing at Castle 
Hewin, Liddel Mote and Dunwalloght Castle. (Trans. 
Cumb. & Westm. A. & A. Soc, N.S., Vol. IX.) 

Gray (H. St. George). — Report on the Avebury Excavations, 
1908. (Brit. Assoc Report, 1908). 

Interim Report on the Excavations at Maumbury Rings. 

Dorchester, 1908. (Proc. Dorset Field Club, Vol. XXIX 
Also issued separately.) 

" On the Stone Circles of East Cornwall." With five 

scale plans and eight other illustrations. (Archseologia, 
Vol. LXI.) 



13 

Gray (H. St. George). — "Excavations at Norton Camp, near 
Taunton, 1908." (Proc. Som. Arch. & N. H. Soc, Vol. 
LIV.) 

Hamnett (R.). — " Excavations at the Roman Camp of Melandra, 
1906-7." (Journ. Derbysh. Arch. & N. H. Soc, Vol. XXX.) 

Harrison (William). — " The Defensive Earthworks and Fortified 
Enclosures of Cheshire." (Trans. Lanes. & Chesh. Ant. 
Soc, Vol. XXV.) 

Haverfield (F.). — " Roman Dolaucothy." (Trans. Carmarthensh. 
Ant. Soc, Vol. V.) 

Hill (Rev. A. Du Boulay).— " The Saxon Boundaries of 
Downton, Wilts." (Wilts. Arch. Mag., Vol. XXXVI.) 

Hill (Rev. E.).— "The Warbanks at Cockfield." (Proc Suffolk 
Inst, of Archaeology, Vol. XIII, Part 2.) 

Hope (W. H. St. John). — "Excavations on the Site of the 
Roman City at Silchester in 1907." (Archseologia, Vol. 
LXI.) 

" The Castle of Ludlow." (Archgeologia, Vol. LXI.) 

Hughes (T. McK.). — " A Section in the Alluvium of Melbourn, 
Cambs." (Proc. Cambr. Ant. Soc, Vol. XI, Part 3.) 

" Ancient Trenches and Interments near Shepreth, 

Cambs." (Proc. Cambr. Ant. Soc, Vol. XI, Part 3.) 

Keynes (G. L.)., and White (H. G. Evelyn). — "Excavations at 
Earith Bulwarks." (Proc. Cambr. Ant. Soc, Vol. XII.) 

Killick (H. F.).— " Thetford Castle." (Norf. Ant. Misc., N.S., 
Vol. I, Part 3.) 

Knowles (W. H), and Forster (R. H.).— " The Corbridge 
Excavations, 1908." (Arch. Journ., Vol. LXVI.) 

Laver (Henry). — " A Survey of Gryme's Dyke and the other 
Earthworks on Lexden Heath." (Trans. Essex Arch. 
Soc, Vol. XI, Part 1.) 

Lowerison (Bellerby).— " The Sites of Three Danish Camps, and 
an Anglian Burying Ground in East Anglia." (Saga 



14 

Book of the Viking Club; Vol. VI, Part I.) The three 
camps for which the writer claims Danish origin are those 
at Holkham, Warham, and South Creake, Norfolk. 

MacRitchie (David). — " The Kewach's Castle." (Antiquary, 
Vol. XLIV, 1908.) 

March (H. Colley). — " The Ritual of Barrows and Circles." 
(Proc. Dorset Field Club, Vol. XXIX.) 

Orpen (G. H.). — "Motes and Norman Castles in Co. Louth." 
(Journ. Roy. Soc. Ant. Irel., Vol. XXXVIII.) 

Pryce (T. Davies). — " Oldox or Hodox Camp, Oxton." (Trans. 
Thoroton Soc, Vol. XII.) 

Pryce (T. Davies), and Dobson (F. W.). — " An Ancient Village 
Site: Whimpton, Notts." (Trans. Thoroton Soc, 
Vol. XL) 

Reader (F. W.). — Report of the Red Hills Exploration Com- 
mittee, 1906-7. (With Introductory Note by Horace 
Wilmer, Hon. Sec. of the Committee.) (Proc. Soc. Ant. 
Lond., 2 Ser., XXII, 164. Also issued separately.) 

Rye (Walter). — " Earthworks at Mousehold Heath." (Notes on 
earthworks formerly existing.) (Norfolk Archaeology, 
Vol. XVI.) 

Salzmann (L. F.). — "Excavations at Pevensey, 1906-7." 
Sussex Arch. Collections, Vol. LI.) 

"Excavations on the site of the Roman Fortress at 

Pevensey, 1907-8." (Arch. Journ., Vol. LXV.) 

Sheppard (T.). — " Prehistoric Relics from Middleton." Refers 
to tumuli at Middleton on the Wolds. (Hull Museum 
Publications, No. 55, Sept. 1908, with plate.) 

Smith (Reginald A.). — " Romano-British Remains at Cobham." 
(Surrey Arch. Collections, Vol. XXI.) 

Stapleton (Philip). — "Explorations of Moel-y-Gaer, Bodfari." 
(Archseologia Cambrensis, 6th Ser., Vol IX. Part 2.) 

Tench (E. J.). "Norwich Castle Mound." (Norfolk Arch., 
Vol. XVII.) 



15 

Walker (Rev. F. G.). — Report on the Excavations at Barton. 
(Proc. Cambr. Ant. Soc, Vol. XII.) 

Ward (John). — "Excavations of a Tumulus on Cadno Mountain, 
near Pendine." (Trans. Carmarthensh. Ant. Soc, Vol. V.) 

Westropp (T. J.) — "Types of the Ring-Forts remaining in 
Eastern Clare." (The Newmarket Group.) (Proc. Roy. 
Irish Academy, Vol. XXVII, Section C.) 

" Promontory Forts in the ' Irrus,' Co. Clare." (Journ. 

Royal Soc. Ant. Irel., Vol. XXXVIII.j 

" Ring-Forts in the Barony of Moyarta, Co. Clare, 

and their Legends." (Journ. Roy. Soc. Ant. Irel., Vol. 
XXXVIII.) 

Wooler (Edward). — " The Catrail " (concluded). (Antiquary, 
Vol. XLIV, 1908.) 

Yorke (Rev. A. C). — " The Round Moat at Fowlmere." (Proc. 
Cambr. Ant. Soc, Vol. XII, Part 1.) 



The Scheme of Classification issued in 1903 and the Appendixes 
of 1904 and 1905 being out of print, the Committee has revised the 
whole for early reissue with an entirely new set of plans. 

To meet the cost of reissue a special fund has been raised to which 
the Society of Antiquaries has contributed p£io, the Royal Archaeo- 
logical Institute £2 2s., the British Archaeological Association £2 2s., 
the Viking Club £2 2s., the Cambridge Antiquarian Society j£i t other 
sums having been subscribed by persons interested in the work of the 
Committee. 

It is anticipated that the new Scheme will be ready for distribution 
in the autumn, and copies will be obtainable from the Secretary at 3*/. 
each, post free. Societies may obtain the Scheme in quantities of fifty 
copies and upwards, at a reduced rate. 



i6 



CLASSIFICATION. 

The classification of defensive works recommended by the Committee 
now stands as follows : — 

a. Fortresses partly inaccessible by reason of precipices, 

cliffs, or water, defended in part only by artificial works. 

b. Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the 

natural line of the hill. 

Or, though usually on high ground, less dependent on 
natural slopes for protection. 

c. Rectangular or other enclosures of simple plan (including 

all forts and towns of the Romano-British period). 

D. Forts consisting only of a mount with encircling moat or 
fosse. 

e. Fortified mounts, wholly or partly artificial, with remains 

of an attached court or bailey, or showing two or more 
such courts. 

f. Homestead moats, consisting of simple or compound 

enclosures formed into artificial islands by water moats. 

G. Enclosures, mostly rectangular, partaking of the form 
of F, but protected by stronger defensive works, ram- 
parted and fossed, and in some instances provided with 
outworks.' 

h. Ancient village sites protected by walls, ramparts or fosses. 

x. Defensive or other works which fall under none of the 
above headings. 




2 S OCT 1938 






CONGRESS 



OF 



in Union with the 

JULY 7tH, 1909. 



The Twentieth Congress of Archaeological Societies was held 
on July 7th, at Burlington House ; C. H. Read, Esq., LL.D., President 
of the Society of Antiquaries, in the Chair. 

The Congress was attended by Delegates from the Society of 
Antiquaries, the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland" (2), the 
Royal Archaeological Institute (2), the British (2) and Cambrian 
Archaeological Associations, the British Record, the Folk-lore (2), the 
Huguenot (2) and the Viking Societies, and the Societies for Berk- 
shire (2), Bucks, Cambridge (2), Carmarthenshire (2), Chester and 
North Wales, Cornwall, Cumberland and Westmorland, Leicester- 
shire, Notts (Thoroton), Somerset (2), Suffolk, Surrey (2), Sussex (2), 
Wilts and Yorkshire, Members of the Council of the Earthworks and 
other Committees, and other Delegates who omitted to sign the 
Register. 

The Minutes of the last Congress, held on July 8th, 1908, were 
read and confirmed. 

The Report of the Council was read and approved, and the State- 
ment of Accounts, audited by Mr. Win. Minet, F.S.A., was read and 
adopted. The thanks of the meeting were given to Mr. Minet for his 
services, and he was appointed auditor for the ensuing year. 

The following were elected as the Council : — 

The Officers of the Soc. of Antiquaries. W. H. St. John Hope, M.A. 
W. Paley Baildon, F.S.A. Henry Laver, F.S.A. 

Lord Balcarres, M.P., F.S.A. Wm. Minet, F.S.A 

Sir E. W. Brabrook, C.B., F.S.A. 
Rev. P. H. Ditchfield, M.A., F.S.A 
W. J. Freer, F.S.A. 
G. L. Gomme, F.S.A. 
Emanuel Green, F.S.A. 



Canon Rupert Morris, D.D., F.S.A. 
Ralph Nevill, F.S.A. 
J. Horace Round, M.A., LL.D. 
J. B. Willis-Bund, M.A., F.S.A. 



Mr. C. F. Keyset - expressed the regret of the Congress at the 
retirement of Mr. Ralph Nevill from the office of honorary secretary 



that he had held for fifteen years ; the President bore testimony to the 
ability and discretion shown by Mr. Nevill in the discharge of the 
office, and a cordial vote of thanks was given to him by acclamation. 

Mr. Nevill in thanking the meeting stated that reasons of health 
made him anxious to secure freedom from engagements ; he had 
also always been of opinion that honorary secretaries should not 
continue in office too long, but make way for new men ; he had wished 
to retire some years ago, had he been able to find some one to take up 
the work. Among the subjects that he had himself introduced, or 
been closely associated with, were Parish Registers, Churchyard 
Inscriptions, the Photographic Survey, the Index of Archaeological 
Papers, Calendars of Portraits, Municipal and County Records, and 
the proposals for the formation of Local Record Offices, which, with 
slight modifications, had been adopted by the Royal Commission and 
incorporated in a Bill. He had always endeavoured to arrange that 
the Congress should take up work of various sorts, and should not 
confine itself to one particular branch, and should keep before it as its 
objects, not so much the promotion of pure archaeology, as the 
assistance of the work of the local societies that it represented. The 
prospectus of the Congress showed the large amount of important 
work that had been done by it, and of late years the Congress had 
been able to make valuable representations to Government, many of 
which had had effect. The Congress had lost as members some of 
the earlier subscribing societies, but these were of unimportant 
character, and others of importance had joined, so that the Congress 
could now claim to be thoroughly representative. 

Sir Edward Brabrook then, on behalf of the Council, proposed as 
honorary secretary Mr. A. G. Chater, who had shown himself an 
energetic secretary of the Earthworks Committee. Mr. Keyser 
seconded this, and Mr. Chater was elected, and expressed his willing- 
ness to accept the office. Mr. Nevill undertook to conclude the work 
of the present Congress. 

Mr. Fry stated that as there appeared to be no chance of the 
Congress publishing the Bibliographies of printed Calendars that had 
been already prepared, the Committee had not taken further active 
steps. He asked that a certain sum should be set apart for the use of 
the Committee, and suggested that if an annual volume of Transactions 
were issued by the Congress it would get over the inconvenience of 
the issue of numerous small pamphlets. Mr. Phillimore supported 
this view, and expressed the opinion that it was not necessary to print 
copies for all members of Societies, but a limited number only. 

Mr. Nevill explained that the method in the past had been to 
devote sums at intervals to different objects, and that he did not think 
the funds sufficient for annual grants. The funds had lately been 
devoted largely to Earthworks Reports, as to which something would 
be said later ; he should like to hear the opinion of the Congress as to 
the manner in which the Bibliographies should be published ; he 
thought they should be completed and kept up to date, but not 
published until a considerable number were ready so as to avoid 



the inconvenience of small issues. His experience was that it was 
useless to expect secretaries of societies to undertake the great labour 
and expense of the issue of publications to selected members ; the 
issue could be done to all members at little more expense and no 
trouble, as it was made with the annual volume of Transactions or 
with other annual notices. 

Major Freer, F.S.A. (Leicester), said that in his experience the 
Reports were much appreciated by the body of members, and as an 
honorary secretary he confirmed the view as to the impossibility of 
selected issue. 

On the suggestion of the President the question of the best method 
of printing the Bibliographies was referred to the Council, it being 
understood that money should be found for the purpose. 

Mr. Nevill explained that owing to the falling off in the number of 
subscribing societies, and the increase in volume, Messrs. Constable 
had given notice that it was impossible for them to continue the 
publication of the Annual Index of Archaeological Papers except at an 
increased rate. He did not think from his experience at the time the 
Congress published the Index that the price could be raised, and 
thought that Messrs. Constable had relied entirely on the subscriptions 
of the societies instead of appealing to a larger public as had been 
contemplated by the Congress. The Congress could have continued 
the publication but for the trouble caused by the desire of libraries 
and individuals to acquire copies. They were willing to pay the 
shilling which had been the charge, but the work of distribution was 
more than an honorary secretary could be expected to undertake. He 
had considered that an energetic publisher should be able to make 
the work pay. 

Mr. Phillimore (Thoroton Soc.) said that he hoped the publication 
would in some way be continued ; he considered it most valuable and 
pre-eminently a work for the Congress to undertake, as it summarized 
the work of the societies. 

Major Freer deprecated any increase in the price, but hoped the 
publication would be continued, and Mr. Fry and many other 
delegates expressed the same views. 

Sir Edward Brabrook, Mr. Minet, Mr. Gomme, and Mr. Phillimore 
were appointed a committee to consider what was best to be done. 

Mr. Chater presented the Report ot the Earthworks Commission, 
which proved full of interest, and will be issued separately. The 
original scheme being out of print, a revised scheme embodying the 
various annual Reports had been prepared, and by the help of the 
Society of Antiquaries and other Societies was now ready or issue at 
the price of 3d. a copy, or on reduced terms for quantities. 

Dr. Williams Freeman who was engaged in scheduling the Hamp- 
shire camps gave some information as to this work. Instead of forty 
camps, as shown on the Ordnance Survey, there were seventy or 
eighty. 






A discussion took place on the cost of the Annual Reports of the 
Earthworks Committee, which absorbed most of the funds at the 
disposal of the Congress. It was agreed that it was most important 
that these admirable Reports should not be curtailed as they had 
proved of the greatest value, and awakened great interest in a new 
department of Archaeology. 

Mr. Nevill asked if delegates thought that Societies would pay 
something for the copies they received ; as 1 5,000 copies were printed 
even such a small sum as two shillings a hundred would provide a 
great part of the cost, and such a payment would also meet the views 
expressed by Major Freer earlier — that the large societies had an 
vendue advantage over the smaller. 

Sir Edward Brabrook thought two shillings too little, but the 
Rev. F. W. Weaver, representing Somerset, with over 800 members, 
thought the charge should be kept as low as possible. Mr. Johnston, 
F.S.A., speaking for Sussex, with over 600 members, said the interest 
in the subject was increasing, and thought his society would pay two 
shillings and sixpence freely, and Mr. Denison, for Yorkshire, with 600 
members, agreed to the charge of two shillings and sixpence, which 
was generally accepted. 

'The President drew attention to the fact that the Royal Commission 
appointed did not render unnecessary the work of local societies. The 
destruction done was largely the result of ignorance, and could be best 
combated by the spread of information. 

Mr. H. D. Acland (Royal Institution of Cornwall) introduced the 
subject of stone monuments, which especially interested his society. 
He was a member of the newly formed society for the astronomical 
st,udy of these remains, and had had his attention called to the sad 
destruction that still went on, owing largely to the public ignorance 01 
their importance. The site of what was perhaps the oldest church in 
England — Withian, near St. Ives, founded by Breton missionaries — 
had been sold by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to a Nonconformist 
who refused to allow any exploration. Menhirs were still removed to 
form gate posts, and numerous stones duly recorded on the Ordnance 
Survey had now disappeared, and stone circles were still destroyed to 
form road metal. 

He advocated the provision of 6 inch Ordnance maps on which the 
existence of all monuments, could be underlined in red ; also that any 
inspector appointed sboiild have power to expend small sums in 
fencing and protecting stories. 

He said that he had found schoolmasters take the greatest interest 
in the subject, and that by interesting their scholars they had done a 
great deal to. stop destruction. 

Canon Warren (Suffolk) said that the same conditions prevailed in 
Devonshire, and instanced- a case in which a farmer had deliberately 
destroyed a stone circle because of the number of visitors who were 
attracted by it. 



Mr. Major (Somerset) suggested that landlords should put a clause 
in their leases insuring the preservation of such antiquities. 

Mr. P. H. Johnston thought the suggestion to interest school- 
masters most valuable, and the Rev. F. W. Weaver wished to 
include schoolmistresses. 

Mr. Edward Owen introduced himself as delegate for the Royal 
Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, and Secretary of the Royal 
Commission on the Ancient Monuments of Wales. He stated that 
the Commission had made a special point of asking for information 
from the schoolmasters, and in Montgomery had issued a circular and 
schedule, with a list of all known monuments in each parish, to the 
schools as well as to the clergy. Information received in consequence 
had been of great value. He complained of the callousness of local 
authorities and of Government authorities. 

The Office of Woods and Forests had given to a quarry company 
a lease of the important stone fortress of Pen Maen Mawr, and this 
was now doomed. 

Mr. R. Garraway Rice, F.S.A. (Sussex), said that he had found 
schoolmasters and mistresses of great assistance in the collection of 
prehistoric implements, and boys had taken up eagerly the work of 
finding such ; it was, however, only a few in his county who could be 
interested. 

The Rev. F. G. Walker (Cambridge) wished to say a good word 
for the parsons who were continually appealing for guidance and help ; 
he had himself made much use of schoolmasters, who were often 
agents for local papers. Two years ago he had excavated a tumulus 
two miles firono Cambridge, and in consequence of a notice in the 
paper, the site was visited on a Sunday after by 2,000 people who 
drank the publics dry, and caused him to receive a letter of thanks 
from the brewers. School museums created an interest, and he had 
found boys quite useful in excavating, and in keeping an eye on road 
material. 

Mr. Nevill pointed out that at the first Congress he advocated the 
provision by the societies of 6 inch Ordnance maps, on which every- 
thing of interest should be noted. His Surrey Society had purchased 
a set, and found them most useful, but he was afraid not much had 
been done in the way of record. Subsequently the Society ot 
Antiquaries had drawn up a scheme for archaeological maps of 
counties on which everything known could be recorded by agreed 
symbols indicating character and date. Several maps of counties had 
been issued, but it appeared impossible to get the work done generally. 
The scheme of marks should certainly be adopted by anyone who was 
working on maps. 

The President said that the subject of stone and prehistoric 
monuments was one that specially interested him. When Lord 
Avebury's Bill was passed, strong objection was raised to interference 



with the rights of private property, but it was possible that there 
might be more chance now for the passing of even such drastic 
measures as those proposed by Mr. Acland. He himself had once 
devised a scheme for preparing illustrations of the principal objects of 
prehistoric interest that could be circulated and exhibited in schools ; 
no doubt many flint and other implements might then be preserved 
that were now thrown away. Possibly the Congress might, in con- 
junction with the Society of Antiquaries, develop such a scheme. 

The Rev. E. Goddard (Wilts) thought such diagrams would be 
most useful, and on his proposal, seconded by Canon Morris, it was 
resolved — " That the Council of the Society of Antiquaries be asked to 
consider the possibility of preparing, in conjunction with the Congress, 
a scheme for circulating diagrams of prehistoric remains to all 
educational institutions." 

Dr. Read then left the chair, which, after a vote of thanks to him, 
was taken by Mr. C. F. Keyser. 

On the motion of Mr. Freer, the attention of societies was invited 
to the desirability of their providing and marking 6 inch maps accord- 
ing to the scheme of the Society of Antiquaries. 

On the proposal of Mr. Acland the secretary was directed to write 
to the Royal Commissions on Ancient Monuments of England and 
Wales, expressing the great satisfaction with which the Congress 
viewed their appointment, and their earnest hope that some measures 
for the preservation of the monuments might follow in consequence of 
their reports. 

Mr. Nevill reported a letter from Sir H. George Fordham, Chair- 
man of the Cambridgeshire County Council, pointing out the incorrect- 
ness of the statement in the Minutes of the Congress of 1908, that the 
Tithe maps were in the custody of the Clerks of the Peace. Accord- 
ing to the Act one copy was to be deposited with the Registrar of the 
Diocese, and the other with the Incumbent and Churchwardens of the 
Diocese. 

The latter have, in perhaps the majority of cases, disappeared. 
The Inclosure Awards ought to be in the custody of the Clerks of the 
Peace, but are often missing. 

Mr. E. Owen stated that complete sets of the Tithe maps were in 
the hands of the Board of Agriculture. 

Mr. Keyser said that it would be valuable if returns were obtained 
by County Councils of all such documents in parish or other hands. 

Major Freer stated that this had been done in Leicestershire and 
the results printed, and also in other counties. 

The Rev. F. W. Alington (East Herts), on behalf of Mr. W. B. 
Gerish, honorary Secretary of his Society, brought forward a proposal 
that the Record Office should be asked to provide a set of their 



publications to be issued on loan to workers unable to attend public 
libraries. Sympathy was expressed for the object of the motion, 
though it was not thought practicable, and it was not carried. 

The following resolution, proposed by Mr. Ralph lSievill, of which 
notice had been given, was seconded by Canon Morris, and supported 
by many members, and carried unanimously : it was thought that the 
object desired by Mr. Gerish might in this manner be achieved. 

" That where Archaeological Societies representing counties have 
libraries, Government be asked to supply copies of the 
Record Office publications on condition that such libraries 
are maintained in an efficient and proper manner." 

Mr. Johnston drew attention to action lately taken in the Diocese 
of Chichester, in consequence of which the Bishop had appointed a 
standing committee of archaeological experts to advise on all cases in 
which a faculty was applied for. He thought that action might 
profitably be taken by the Congress to promote the general formation 
of such Committees. 

The meeting cordially agreed with this view, and the hour being 
late, asked Mr. Johnston to bring the matter forward at the next 
Congress. 

On the motion of Dr. Gaster (Folk-lore Society), a vote of thanks 
was passed to the Chairman, and to the Society of Antiquaries for the 
use of the room. 

RALPH NEVILL, 

Hon. Secretarv, 1909. 

Castle Hill, 

Guildford. 



Harrison & Sons, Printers in Ordinary to His Majesty, St. Martin s Lane, W.C. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS (Continued). 

WILTSHIRE— THE TOPOGRAPHICAL COLLECTIONS OP JOHN 
ABUREY, F.E.S., A.D. 1659-1670. Corrected and enlarged by the Eev. Canon 
J. E. Jackson, M.A., P.S.A. In 4to, Cloth, pp. 491, with 46 plates. Price £2 10*. 

WILTSHIRE INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. CHAELES I. 8vo., 
pp. vii., 501. 1901. With full index. En 8 parts, as issued. Price 13*. 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY of the GREAT STONE MONUMENTS of 
WILTSHIRE, STONE HENGE and AVEBURY, with other references, 
by W. Jerome Harrison, P.G.S., pp. 169, with 4 illustrations. No. 96, Dec. 
1901, of the Magazine. Price 5*. 6d. Contains particulars as to 947 books, 
papers, &c, by 732 authors. 



The Tropenell Cartulary. 

This very important genealogical and topographical work 
in 2 vols., 8vo., pp. 927, containing a great number of deeds 
connected with property in many Wiltshire parishes of the 
14th & 15th centuries, has recently been published by the 
Society, and issued to subscribers. Only 150 copies were 
printed of which a few are left. Price to members, £1 10s. 
and to non-members £2. Apply to Mr. D. Owen, Bank 
Chambers, Devizes. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

A certain space on the cover of the Magazine will in future be 
available for Advertisements of Books or other kindred matters. 
For terms apply to the Rev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, 
Swindon. 



FOE, SALE. -A COMPLETE SET OF THE WILTS ARCH. MAG. 

Bound balf-calf extra. What offers ? 
Back Numbers of Wilts Arch. Mag. to make up sets can be had. 
BOOKBINDING 1 . — The ArcliEeological Magazine carefully bouud to 

pattern. Estimates given. 

Apply .— C. H. WOODWARD, 

Printer and Publisher, Devizes. 



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AND — 



LIBRARY AT DEVIZES. 



In answer to the appeal made in 1905, annual subscriptions, 
varying from £2 to 5s., to the amount of about £35 a year for this 
purpose have been given by about eighty Members of the Society, 
and the fund thus set on foot has enabled the Committee already 
to add much to the efficiency of the Library and Museum. 

It is very desirable that this fund should be raised to at least 
£50 a year, in order that the General Fund of the Society may 
be released to a large extent from the cost of the Museum, and 
set free for the other purposes of the Society. 

Subscriptions of 5s. a year, or upwards, are asked for, and 
should be sent either to Me. D. Owen, Bank Chambers, Devizes, 
or Eev. E. H. Goddard, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 

The Committee appeal to Members of the Society and others 
to secure any 

Objects of Antiquity 

found in the County of Wilts and to forward them to the 
Hon. Curator, Mr. B. H. Cunnington, Devizes. 

Old Deeds connected with Wiltshire Properties, 

Books, Pamphlets, Articles, Portraits, 
Illustrations from recent Magazines or Papers, 

bearing in any way on the County, or the work of Wiltshire 
xVuthors, will be most gratefully received lor the Library by 
the Rev. E. H. Goddahd, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, Hon. 
Librarian. 

O. H. WOODWARD, MACHINfc PRINTER, DEVIZES. 



28 0CT]95g 



^ 




No. CXIII. 



JUNE, 1910. Vol. XXXVI. 



THE 



WILTSHIEE 

IrrjjcMiIogiral rail Hofaral- listort) 
MAGAZINE, 

)9ttbIt^t)eU Miitrrr tl)f BBtrrrtiau 

OF THE 

SOCIETY FORMED IN THAT COUNTY, 
A. D. 185 3. 



EDITED BY 

KEV. E. H. GODDAED, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon. 




DEVIZES : 

Printed and sold for the Society by C. H. Woodward, 
4, St. John Street. 



Price 5s. 6d. Members, Gratis. 



NOTICE TO MEMBEES. 

TAKE NOTICE, that a copious Index for the preceding eight 
volumes of the Magazine will be found at the end of Vols. 
viii., xvi., xxiv., and xxxii. The subsequent Volumes are 
each indexed separately. 

Members who have not paid their Subscriptions to the Society for 
the current year, are requested to remit the same forthwith to 
the Financial Secretary, Mr David Owen, Bank Chambers, 
Devizes, to whom also all communications as to the supply 
of Magazines should be addressed. 

The Numbers of this Magazine will he delivered gratis, as issued, 
to Members who are not in arrear of their Annual Subscrip- 
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Society's publications will not be forwarded to Members whose 
Subscriptions shall remain unpaid after such notice." 

All other communications to be addressed to the Honorary Secre- 
taries: the Kev. E. H. Goddakd, Clyffe Vicarage, Swindon, 
and E. 0. P. Bouverie, Esq., F.S.A., The Old House, Market 
.Lavington, Wilts. 



THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. 

To be obtained of Mr. D. OWEN, Bank Chambers, Devizes. 

THE BRITISH AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES OF THE NORTH 
WILTSHIRE DOWNS, by the Rev. A. C. Smith, M.A. One Volume, Atlas 
4to, 248 pp., 17 large Maps, and 110 Woodcuts, Extra Cloth. Price £2 2s. 
One copy offered to each Member of the Society at £1 lis. 6d. 

THE FLOWERING PLANTS OF WILTSHIEE. One Volume, 8vo, 
504 pp., with Map, Cloth. By the Rev. T. A. Preston, M.A. Price to the 
Public, 16s. ; but one copy offered to every Member of the Society at half-price. 

CATALOGUE of the STOURHEAD COLLECTION of ANTIQUITIES 
in the SOCIETY'S MUSEUM, with 175 Illustrations. Price Is. 6d, 

CATALOGUE of the SOCIETY'S LIBRARY at the MUSEUM. 
Price Is. APPENDIX No. I, II., and III., 3d. each. 

CATALOGUE of DRAWINGS, PRINTS, and MAPS, in the SOCIETY'S 
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STONEHENGE AND ITS BARROWS, by W. Long— Nos. 46-7 of the 
Magazine in separate wrapper, 7s. 6d. This still remains the best and most 
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WILTSHIRE 

■Irrjj&ologiral nnit Itotaral listarq 
' MAGAZINE. 

No CXIII. JUNE, 1909. Vol. XXXVI. 



Contents. page. 

On the Date op the Ecclesiola at Bradford-on-Ayon : By 

John Beddoe, M.D., LED., F.B.S., President of the Society... 359 

Notes on Audley House, Salisbury: By J. J. Hammond 364 

The Excavation of a Roman Well nr. Silbury Hill, October, 

1908: By J. W. Brooke, F.S.A., (Scot., )F.R.N.S 373 

The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury: By T. H. Baker 376 

Salisbury. A Royal Aid and Supply for 1667 : Transcribed 

by the Rev. Edmund R. Nevill, B.A 413 

Notes on the Allington Gold Torc : By H. St. George Gray... 435 

The Society's MSS .'. .. 439 

A List of Briefs from the Register Books of Langley 

Burrell: Transcribed by the Rev. A. B. Mynors 448 

Notes on the Boman Antiquities in the Westbury Collection 

at the Museum, Devizes: By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington 464 

Notes on Iron Objects of Roman (?) Age in the Society's 

Museum at Devizes: By the Rev. E. H. Goddard 478 

Notes 486 

Wilts Obituary 491 

Becent Wiltshire Books, Pamphlets Articles, &g 496 

Books and Articles by Wiltshire Authors 504 

Wilts Illustrations 505 

Wilts Portraits 506 

Additions to Museum and Library 508 

Balance Sheet 1909 510 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Portion of a Gold Torc, found on Allington Down, 

N. Wilts 437 

Roman Objects from Westbury (eleven Plates) 470 

Plate I. — Iron Objects found at or near a Roman 

Settlement at Baydon 479 

Plate II. — Iron Objects from Different Localities on 

the Downs 480 

riate III. — Iron Objects from Rushall Down 481 

Plate IV. — Iron Objects found on the Downs 482 

DEVIZES : C. H. Woodward, 4 Saint John Street. 



THE 



WILTSHIRE MAGAZINE. 



"MULTOEUM MANIBUS GRANDE LETATUE ONUS." — Ovid. 



June, 1910. 



ON THE DATE OF THE ECCLESIOLA AT 
BEADFORD-ON-AVON 
By John Beddoe, M.D., LL.D., F.E.S., 

President of the Society. 

A few years ago those who took an interest in the ecclesiola at 
Brad ford-on-A von seemed to have settled down comfortably in the 
belief that the existing building was the work of St. Aldhelm ; but 
since then several formidable objectors have arisen, who will not 
subscribe to so early a date as that of Ine's reign. The late Mr. 
Micklethwaite was incredulous ; then arose Baldwin Brown, who, 
while acknowledging the glamour of antiquity about its general 
aspect, objects to sundry details, such as the compound pilasters 
and the doubly-splayed windows, as being of later evolution, and 
pointing to the latter part of the tenth century ; and now comes 
Signor Bivoira with two beautiful and richly- illustrated volumes, 
in which the earliest date he will allow to our poor little Church 
is the reign of Edward the Confessor, while he would by no means 
object to put it as late as the Norman Conquest. Bishop Browne, 
however, stands to his guns, and still ascribes the building to St. 
Aldhelm, though he may have some doubts about the arcading. 

I would like to suggest some considerations on the subject, based 
on a perusal of Bivoira's valuable work, and especially of the 
illustrations. 

VOL. XXXVI. — NO. CXIII. 2 B 



360 On the Date of the Ecclesiola at Bradford-on-Avon. 

Firstly, the tradition of pilasters and of blind arcading had never 
been lost since the classical period. There is no century from the 
fifth downwards in which both of these features do not occur, more 
or less frequently, though it is true that the sporadic forms de- 
veloped into an epidemic about the eleventh century. The models 
were to be found somewhere, during all the time, now here, now 
there, but especially in and about Eavenna. The form of capital 
used in the arcade at Bradford-on-Avon occurs in the famous 
Binbirderek 1 at Cons tan tinople,where I have seen it myself : Eivoira 
gives the date as 528. But this is a simple form which might 
readily occur to any ordinary mind ; nor indeed is the multiple 
pilaster, like a bundle of reeds, a very recondite form. It is very 
well seen in details in the sixth century Churches of Agia Sophia 
at Constantinople and Salonica. Horizontal ribbing, reminding 
one of the vertical ribbing at Bradford-on-Avon, occurs on a pillar 
in Monkwearmouth Church, which Sig. Eivoira himself dates in i 
the seventh century. 

My leading point, then, is that Aldhelm might easily have not 
only heard described, but actually seen, those peculiar features in 
Church building which are "calumniated" at Bradford-on-Avon.; 
In fact he needed not to have gone outside Borne 2 for his ideas. I 
should, perhaps, except the double-splaying of windows : I have 
not material to guide me on this point ; but it does not seem very 
important ; and we have so few buildings of the seventh .and eighth 
centuries extant that its absence may well be due simply to the 
" imperfection of the record." 

Eivoira speaks of the fine though somewhat stumpy tower of 
Earl's Barton as the swan song of Anglo-Saxon architecture, be- 
longing to the eleventh century, and a further development of the 
nearly contemporary tower of Barnack. But its leading feature 
is found at Toscanella, in the 8th century, and most unmistakably 
in the memorial chapel at Lorsch, in Germany, of Louis the Saxon 
(A.D. 876 — 881), from which it might quite well have been copied ; 
so that there was no reason, constructive or developmental, why 

1 The great cistern called the Thousand-and-Oue Columns. 
2 e x g., the Rotondo of St. Petronilla. 



By John Beddoe, M.D., LL.D., F.R.S. 361 

Earl's Barton tower might not have been built a century and a 
half before its probably actual date. 

Another consideration occurs to me with respect to the north 
porch of Bradford-on-Avon. The rudeness of some of its details 
used to make me think that it was the oldest portion of the building. 
There is an absence of arcading and of multiple pilastering, and 
the arches of both door and window are of extreme rudeness, giving 
one the impression that they must have been the first ever con- 
structed by a man accustomed to build only, in Saxon fashion, in 
wood or in " wattle-and-daub," but whom Aldhelm, according to 
tradition a good judge of stone, had set to unaccustomed mason- 
work. Aldhelm, however, probably began his little Church in the 
usual way, from the chancel and the nave, to the porches ; and 
my present conjecture is that the north porch was added after 
Aldhelm's death or departure, under the supervision of an inferior 
architect, whose powers blind arcading and reeded pilaster- work 
transcended. But we must not forget that though Bivoira peremp- 
torily dismisses the notion that the arcades were carven out of a 
pre-existing wall, some good architects have been of that opinion. 

With much deference, I incline to think that Rivoira has a little 
bias in the direction of ascribing too late dates to possibly early 
buildings. Thus he puts Bepton Church in the tenth or eleventh 
century ; though, as Bepton ceased to be a royal Mercian residence 
with the downfall of that kingdom in the ninth century, it is 
rather unlikely that much Church-building went on there sub- 
sequently. And he puts the angelic figures at Bradford-on-Avon 
into the twelfth century, though Mr. Baldwin Brown and others 
lay stress on their very close resemblance to some figures in the 
Beuedictional of St. Ethelwold, a book of the tenth century, and 
date the building about that time, simply or partly because of that 
resemblance. 

A point distinctly in favour of an early date for the Church is 
the absence of long-and-short corner-work, which was so prevalent 
in the later Anglo-Saxon period. 

There is a Church at St. Die, in the Vosges (where Amerigo 
Vespucci sojourned awhile), which wonderfully resembles ours, and 

2 B 2 



362 On the Date of the Ecclesiola at Bradford-on-Avon. 

is, or used to be, ascribed to the seventh century ; but I am told 
that infidels have sprung up there also, who doubt its extreme 
antiquity. 

Some think that Aldhelm's Church, if he really built one, would 
certainly have been destroyed by the Danes in the time of Ethelred 
the Unready. If it had been of wood, like that of Doulting, that 
might probably enough have happened ; but there is little doubt 
that it was of stone : the English, as well as the Irish, had already 
begun to build Churches of stone {e.g., at Jarrow and at Monk- 
wearmouth) ; Aldhelm understood stone-masonry ; and there was 
plenty of excellent building stone within sight. As to the- 
destructiveness of the Danes, no doubt there was much reciprocal 
persecution between the Christians and the Heathen, from 
Charlemagne and Witikind to Thangbrand, the doughty missionary 
who set out to Christianize Iceland by a succession of single- 
combats ; but the object of the Danish bands was " loot " ; and it 
is ridiculous to suppose that these roving bands of buccaneers, 
generally not very numerous, would have gone out of their way 
and put themselves to the labour and waste of time needed for 
pulling down a solid stone building. Sweyn Forkbeard was once- 
in the neighbourhood, probably with a considerable force, but be,. 
I think, was a Christian. 

So far I have been endeavouring to weaken the case against an- 
early date ; now let us look at the case in favour of it, the case for 
St. Aldhelm, which depends mainly on the testimony of William 
of Malmesbury. 

Signor Bivoira is somewhat contemptuous of the possibilities of 
tradition. He even thinks it possible that the Aldhelmic story 
might have had its birth in William's own time, for that is what 
would be necessitated if the building had really been erected in 
the reign of the Confessor. I, on the other hand, believe that in 
those times, when writing and book-learning were comparatively 
rare accomplishments, tradition was much stronger and more en- 
during, had more of facts committed to its keeping, and actually 
did preserve them. AVilliam was born about 1075, and lived 
within a longish day's walk of Bradford-on-Avon. There must 



By John Bedcloe, M.D., LL.D., F.R.S. 363 

have been there, in his early days, old men whose memories ex- 
tended at least to the reign of Cnut, and who could testify to the 
existence of the little Church at that time, and to that of the 
Aldhelmic tradition also. These circumstances alone seem to me 
almost absolutely fatal to the Eivoiran or Edward the Confessor 
theory, and though they are not nearly so hostile to that of 
Baldwin Brown, who puts the erection of the Church in the latter 
part of the tenth century, they seem to render it very improbable. 
One sees no particular reason, unless that of his having actually 
founded this little Church, which remained among them from the 
days of their forefathers, why the burgesses of Bradford should 
have cherished the memory of Aldhelm, who had not held a 
position at Bradford such as he had done at Malmesbury or Sher- 
borne. 

It has been objected that William uses the word " fertur "=is 
said or is reported ; but it is difficult to see what other word he 
•could properly have used in quoting a tradition. There was no 
documentary evidence of the fact. William evidently knew the 
building, or he would not have pointedly mentioned its small size ; 
and its aspect had not suggested to him modernity. The force of 
his direct testimony seems to me to outweigh any probabilities 
derived from considerations of the course and dates of architectural 
evolution, especially as on the Continent, whence we have more 
evidence, and whence the Saxons generally derived their models, 
there was nothing like regular architectural progress or evolution 
before the Norman period. 



364 



NOTES ON AUDLEY HOUSE, SALISBURY. 
By J. J. Hammond. 

(Reprinted from the " Salisbury and Winchester Journal" Feb. 6th, 1909-/ 

This house in Crane Street, Salisbury, now known as the Church 
House — T do not refer to the house No. 95, Crane Street, now 
called Audley House, which was never part of the property — j 
derives its name from the fact that, for about fifteen months, i.e. r \ 
from 16th August, 1630, till November, 1631, it was the property 
of Mervin Lord Audley and Earl of Castlehaven. 

Among the many able and interesting articles contributed to, 
the Salisbitry and Winchester Journal by the late Mr. H. J. F„ 
Swayne, was one on Audley House, at the time when it was being 
adapted to its present use. Mr. Swayne dealt chiefly with its 
architectural features, leaning, as he stated, upon Hatcher for his 
facts, and expressing the opinion, that more information might be 
ascertained from the deeds. The authors of Hatcher and Benson's 
Old and New Sarum had not the advantage of seeing the deeds, 
and probably only had notes made by Mi - . Benson from the ledger 
books of the Corporation, for they are fragmentary and incomplete. 1 
The list of Mayors given in Hatcher & Benson requires correction 
both in regard to dates and names. Having lately been permitted 
to peruse all the deeds, I venture to add the information gleaned 
from them. Although no earlier documentary evidence is now 
forthcoming, it is evident that one moiety of this property belonged 
to the Bishop, and one moiety to the Mayor and Corporation, when 
Mervin Earl of Castlehaven acquired it in 1630. 

The only early reference to it known to Mr. Swayne and men- 
tioned in Hatcher and Benson, was an entry, in 1455 amongst the 
Bishop's quit rents, when Sir John Lisle, Knight, paid 4|r7. in re- 
spect of a tenement called The Crane, and in respect of a tenement 

1 Hatcher and Benson, pp. 384 and 597. 



Notes on Audley House, Salisbury. 365 

cum taberna 4|e£., and William Lyghtefoot, in respect of a tenement 
called the Falcon, near the lower bridge in Fisher ton, 4£rf. 1 Mr. 
Swayne suggested that the old part of the house was built by a 
member of the Webb family, and the tangible fact in proof of this 
is, that the merchant's mark of that family is carved on a corbel 
in the present library, then the great hall of the mansion. The 
Eev. Edward Duke, in his " Prolusiones Historical" p. 371, states 
that King Henry VII. was at Salisbury in 1486 (quoting a 
parchment roll which was in the possession of Dr. Maton), "and 
Aubrey says that he paid a visit to Webb, who was a Merchant of 
the Staple." This is all the available evidence of the past history 
of this house. 

As Mr. Swayne stated, the Webbs, to deal briefly with them, 
were Merchants of the Staple here in the fourteenth and fifteenth 
centuries, who prospered and acquired lands in the neighbourhood 
and in Dorsetshire. One of them, by a marriage with the daughter 
and heiress of a Tourney, acquired, in her right, the estate of 
Paine's Place, Dorset, which had come to Tourney, a merchant 
of Salisbury, by bis marriage with the daughter and heiress of 
Paine. 2 Another acquired, as mortgagee of the Cervingtons and 
Gerberd's respectively, the Manor of Langford (now known as 
Longford) and the Manor of Odstock. Langford was sold to Sir 
Thomas Gorges, but Odstock was retained,as one of their residences, 
till about 1790, when Sir John Webb sold it to the Earl of Kadnor. 
By advantageous marriages, and other circumstances, the Webbs 
acquired large estates ; the grandson of the Webb, who acquired 
Odstock was created a baronet. Sir John Webb, who sold Odstock, 
made a remarkable will, whereby he left to his granddaughter, the 
only child of the fifth Earl of Shaftesbury, the Canford Estate — 
a very small portion of his property — and left to an adopted family 
the rest of his estates. He was succeeded in the baronetcy by his 
nephew, on the death of whose son, in 1876, the baronetcy became 
extinct, and no legitimate male Webb of Odstock exists to-day. 

1 Hatcher and Benson, footnote to p. 397. 
2 Hutchins' Dorset, under Motcombe. 



366 Notes on Audley House, Salisbury. 

Lord de Mauley, through his grandmother, is Sir John Webb's 
legal personal representative. 1 

From the fact, that some prominent citizen or member of the 
Corporation generally occupied the house, may not its history have 
been that Webb, or whoever built it, acquired a long lease from 
the Bishop of his moiety, and a long lease from the Corporation of 
their moiety, and afterwards, when the leases expired, it was let 
to some wealthy citizen. Now, in the year 1630, Mr. Anthony 
Weekes was in occupation of the house, and was in treaty with 
the Corporation for a new lease, but the treaty fell through, and 
directions were given to the Chamberlain, to view and survey the 
premises, and, finally, to enter, and " Mr. Weekes moved to repair 
in accordance with his covenants." 2 The treaty fell through, 
presumably, because the Corporation preferred to sell their moiety 
to Lord Castlehaven. By an indenture dated the 16th of August, 
1630, in consideration of £100, and a further sum of £5 for 
charitable uses, the Mayor and Commonalty granted and enfeoffed 
MervinEarl of Castlehaven "of all that messuage, back side, and 
garden, in Crane Street, then or late in the tenure of Anthony 
Weekes, Esq." 3 In 1631, Mervin Earl of Castlehaven was executed, 
and, of the property, one moiety escheated to the Bishop, as Lord 
of the Manor. [I have not seen any particulars how Lord 
Castlehaven acquired the Bishop's moiety, possibly he only had a 
long lease of it.] The other moiety was, no doubt, included in the 
estates of his father, which, 9 Charles I., were re-granted to James 
Earl of Castlehaven, 4 who commenced an action for partition 
against the Bishop. 

In 1634 James Harris, of the Close, Sarum, gentleman, had a 
lease for three years of the Bishop's moiety. James Harris bad 
married Gertrude, daughter of Robert Townson, the previous 
Bishop ; his great-great-grandson was created Earl of Malmesbury 
in 1800. After a partition of the two undivided moieties, Lord 

1 Somerset and Dorset Notes and Queries, voi. x., p. 209. 
■ Ledger III., folio 353. 

3 Ledger III., folio 382. 

4 MSS. Tower Eecords. 



By J. J. Hammond. 367 

Castlehaven conveyed his moiety to Mr. William Collis, a member 
of the Corporation, by an indenture dated 2nd November, 13 
Charles I. (1637), made between James Earl of Castlehaven and 
Thomas Mumpesson of the one part and William Collis and 
Joachim Parker of the other part ; the said moiety, together with 
the other moiety thereof, are therein stated to have been late in 
the tenure of Giles Hutchings, gentleman, deceased, another 
prominent citizen. It looks as if Lord Castlehaven had purchased 
the property, in order to have the latter as a tenant, and proves 
that Lord Castlehaven did not occupy the house himself. 

In 1.617 the city wanted a workhouse, and the old Bridewell in 
St. Thomas's Churchyard was in bad repair. It was decided to 
use Audley House as a workhouse. To this end, the Corporation 
re-purchased their moiety, which had been sold to Mervin Earl of 
Castlehaven, and Bishop Davenant gave to the Mayor and Com- 
monalty a lease of his moiety. This transaction was carried out 
(1) by an indenture dated 9th June, 14 Charles I. (1638), made 
between William Collis and Joachim Parker of the one part, and 
the Mayor and Commonalty of the other part, in consideration of 
£120, the amount which the property had cost him, William Collis 
conveyed the fee simple of his moiety to the Mayor and Com- 
monalty, and (2) by an indenture dated the 20th May, 1638, made 
between John [Davenant] Bishop of Sarum of the one part, and 
the Mayor and Commonalty of the other part, a lease of the 
Bishop's moiety was granted to the Mayor and Commonalty for 
the lives of William Hyde, second son of Humfrey Hyde, of 
Kingston Lisle, in the County of Berks, esquire ; Thomas Hancock, 
the son of Thomas Hancock, jun., of New Sarum, gentleman ; 
and John Reade, the son of Richard Reade, late of Bockford in 
the County of Southampton, gentleman, deceased, at an annual 
rent of 20s. 

A petition was presented to the Star Chamber praying the 
Court to approve of the Bishop's lease ; a copy of the proceedings 
is with the documents, and it appears that the Court duly 
approved, and expressed a hope that succeeding Bishops would 
similarly continue to assist in providing a site for a workhouse. 



368 Notes on Audley House, Salisbury. 

The Corporation passed a resolution thanking the Bishop for 
his gift, and also a resolution thanking Mr. Collis for selling 
his moiety for the same sum as it had cost him. 1 The citizens con- 
tributed to the cost of adapting the buildings to a workhouse ; the 
amounts subscribed are recorded in the Ledger Book. 

In 1673, John Beade being the only surviving life, and Bishop 
Seth Ward desiring to grant a new lease for three lives, Bishop 
Davenant's lease was surrendered, and a new lease, dated 31st 
September, 1673, granted to the Mayor and Commonalty, for the 
lives of John Thistlethwayte, son of Beregrine Thistlethwayte, of 
New Sarum, gentleman ; William Greene, son of Maurice Greene, 
of New Sarum, gentleman; and Symon Williams, son of Thomas 
Williams, of New Sarum, gentleman. A plan, showing the Bishop's 
moiety and the Earl of Castlehaven's moiety, is annexed to this 
lease. Apparently in acknowledgment of this act of generosity on 
the Bishop's part, his portrait was painted for the Corporation by 
John Greenhill, " Mr. John Briaulx, the Steward of the Workhouse, 
to pay for the drawing thereof." 2 The old Bridewell in St. Thomas' 
Churchyard was then let out on lease, being in too dilapidated a 
condition to be repaired and used as a Bridewell. 

In 1728, considerable alterations and additions were made to the 
Workhouse, that part of the present building now occupied by the 
members of the St. Andrew's Mission Society being added to it. 
A plan showing these alterations has lately been given to the 
Church House. 

To follow in detail all the various leases given to the Mayor and 
Commonalty from this date, would be a monotonous repetition. I 
will, therefore, just shortly mention them : — 

A lease, dated 15th December, 1729, by Benjamin Hoadley, 

Bishop of Sarum,for the lives of Maurice Green e.Raulin Hillman, 

of New Sarum, apothecary, and John Davies, of New Sarum, 

woollen draper. 

A lease, dated 16th October, 1758, by John Thomas (the first), 

Bishop of Sarum, for the lives of John Davies, William Hussey, 

1 Ledger III., folio 400. 
- Ledger III., fol. 199. 



By J. J. Hammond. 369 

of New Sarum, esquire, and Henry Dench, of New Sarum, 
gentleman. 

A lease, dated 24th August, 1776, by John Hume, Bishop of 
Sarum, for the- lives of William Hussey, Henry Dench, and 
Samuel Wyatt. 

A lease, dated 28th March, 1796, by John Douglas, Bishop of 
Sarum, for the lives of William Hussey, Henry Dench, and 
George Brown. 

A lease, dated 18th November, 1818, by John Fisher, Bishop 
of Sarum, for the lives of George Brown, John Atkinson (then 
Mayor), and Charles William Everett. This lease expired on 
the death of Mr. C. W. Everett in 1863. 

Erom that date, until the premises ceased to be used as a work- 
house in 1879, the Bishop's moiety was, no doubt, rented upon 
similar terms; but at some period, between 1818 and then, it had 
passed, with the rest of the Episcopal Estates to the Ecclesiastical 
Commissioners, and was purchased from them by Archdeacon 
Sanctuary, who also purchased the moiety belonging to the Cor- 
poration, when the Church House was being formed, and his 
representatives conveyed the whole property to the Salisbury 
Diocesan Board of Finance. 

Of the lives, upon which the Bishop's moiety was held at 
different times, William Hyde and John Thistlethwayte are the 
only names of whom much is known, except, of course, William 
Hussey, George Brown, and C. W. Everett, whose representatives 
still survive amongst ns. William Hyde, the son of Humfrey 
Hyde, of Kingston Lisle, Berks, esquire, was of a different family 
to the family of that name, to whom there are many memorials 
in the Cathedral, and to which Edward Earl of Clarendon belonged. 
The latter family came from Cheshire, and bore arms, azure a 
chevron between three fusils or. The Hydes, of Kingston Lisle, 
bear arms, gules two chevronels argent, and are an ancient Berkshire 
family, one of them being Sheriff for Berks and Oxon in the reign 
of Edward VI. 1 

1 Fuller's Worthies, and Collier's Historical Dictionary, Vol. II., 1688. 



370 Notes on Auclley House, Salisbury. 

Since this paper was written, it has been discovered that 
Humphry Hyde, of Kingston Lisle, married Anne, daughter of Sir 
Lawrence Hyde and Barbara Caslilian his wife : she was the eldest 
of their sixteen children and first cousin to Lord Chancellor 
Clarendon. 1 William, their son, was christened in Salisbury 
Cathedral 2nd September, 1629. 

The Thistlethwaites came into Wiltshire from Yorkshire, and 
were seated for a long period, i.e., from 1537 to the middle of the 
eighteenth century, at West Winterslow ; a pedigree is given in 
the 1623 Visitation of Wilts; there are several monuments to 
members of this family in Winterslow Church ; their arms were, 
Or on a bend azure three pheons of the field. According to the 
Visitation, Peregrine Thistlethwaite was aged 17, in 1623 ; the last 
of the family to own West Winterslow was " the Eev. Dr. Thistle- 
thwaite, who sold West Winterslow to the Hon. Stephen Fox, 
afterwards the second Lord Holland, before 1757." 2 

Eaulin Hillman, mentioned in the lease of 15th December, 1729, 
can, perhaps, be identified with the Eaulin Hillman to whom there 
is a gravestone in the Morning Chapel of the Cathedral; it bears 
a shield of arms Argent three bendlets azure within a bordure en- 
grailed gules for Hillman, impaling gules a cross engrailed between 
twelve crosses crosslet fitchees argent, for Brockhill. Eaulin 
Hillman died on the 23rd June, 1741, aged 48, and Elizabeth, his 
wife, only daughter of Wingfield Brockhill, on the 22nd October, 
1777, aged 60. 

When Audley House was adapted to its present use as a Church 
House, several persons contributed gifts in kind, consisting of old 
chimneypieces. Those in the library and hall came from the 
Dean's House, at Mere, and are fully described in tlie Wilts Arch. 
Mag., vol. xxx., p. 56 ; the handsome chimneypiece in the board 
room was originally in the house. The chimneypiece in the dining 
room of the members of the St. Andrew's Mission Society came from 
an old house in St. Ann Street, which stood opposite the Museum ; 
it has three shields : on the middle shield it bears the Arms of 

1 Visitation of Berks. 
- Hoare's Modern Wilts. 



By J. J. Hammond. 371 

France and England quarterly, on the dexter shield B.P., and on 
the sinister shield, [ ! On a cross five buckles [ ]. 

The chimneypiece in the common room came from a house near 
the Angel Hotel, in Fisherton Street ; that in the room occupied 
by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, from a house 
on the Canal, where Mr. Bloom's premises now stand. 

Jacob, fourth Earl of Kadnor, gave the chimneypiece in the 
smoking room ; it had been given to his grandfather by the 
Corporation of Salisbury, and was in a house in the Fish Bow, 
where the Council House now stands : this house belonged to 
Henry Serryge, who, according to Hatcher and Benson, was Mayor 
of Salisbury in 1508, and bears, on four shields respectively, his 
initials (H.S.), I.H.S., a dolphin embowed, and his merchant's 
mark. 

The chimneypiece in the reading room was also given by the 
same Lord Badnor, at the same time. At a restoration at Longford 
in 1870 — 4, this chimneypiece, of the Benaissance period, which, 
in its entirety, must have been a very mangificent one, was removed 
from the castle, where it had stood, no doubt,' since its erection by 
Sir Thomas Gorges, and Helena Schnachenberg, his wife. When 
given to the Church House, it was lying disused in the timber yard 
at Longford. There was only one room in the Church House of 
sufficient height, where it could have been erected, and, instead of 
using it there, it was divided. The part not used in the reading 
room found its way back to Longford, and was afterwards built 
into a chimneypiece there. Thus divided, it loses its archaeological 
interest ; at some future restoration, it is to be hoped that it may 
yet again adorn, in its original entirety, the house for which it was 
designed. Another improvement would be to restore the parapet 
of Crane Bridge the whole breadth of the garden, in place of the 
present iron railings, with their rather common brickwork supports. 

It has been suggested that a branch of the river ran along the 
west end of the house, and that a merchant occupied the house 
and used a crane for landing his merchandise from barges, &c. A 
channel ran along the west side of the house and joined another 
channel at the south end, which ran along The Close boundary to 



372 Notes on Audley House, Salisbury. 

the river. A channel, such as those, which ran in every street of 
Salisbury within the memory of living inhabitants, is, of course, a 
very different thing from a river. It separated the house from 
the present garden, which never belonged to the property, and, 
although it was proposed to make the river navigable, it has never 
been proved that barges or boats came up the river as an actual 
practice. Moreover, the original sign of the house is said to have 
been "The Falcon." The name Crane as applied to the street and 
bridge is surely much more likely to derive from the fact, that the 
crane was a charge on the coat of arms of some person of influence 
connected with the city, than from the existence of a crane for 
landing goods from a barge. 



373 



THE EXCAVATION" OF A EOMAN WELL NEAB 
SILBTJEY HILL, OCTOBER, 1908. 

By J. W. Beooke, F.S.A. (Scot.), F.B.N.S. 

During ploughing operations on West Kennet Farm, one of 
Mr. William Arnold's horses trod on soft and yielding ground, 
causing the surface to gradually sink and to form a declivity. In 
time the subsidence assumed a circular shape, so, in the hope of 
■discovering an obsolete well, Mr. Arnold kindly allowed an ex- 
ploration. 

The site of the well is immediately opposite Silbury Hill, about 
•one hundred and five yards from the hedge on the south side of 
the Bath Road, and about seventy yards west of the Bourne or 
Kennet and the row of trees. 

On referring to " Smith's British and Roman Antiquities of 
.North Wilts" (page 163) and the map showing the wells near 
■Silbury in the Wilts Arch. Mag. (vol. xxix., p. 166) there seemed 
iittle doubt that this was the site of the well which Messrs. W. & 
H. Cunnington commenced to excavate in 1882, and of which the 
Eev. A. C. Smith writes " the examination is not yet completed." 

The season of 1908 having been dry, and upon report that the 

springs were even lower than usual for the time of year, we decided 

to attack the work directly Mr. Arnold had gathered in his crop 

| of clover. The work was commenced on Wednesday, October 7th, 

1908, in moderately fine weather. 

Three able men were requisitioned, one of them being William 
Coleman, of Avebury, who had similarly assisted Mr. B. Howard 
Cunnington and myself in excavating a Roman well in 1896, which 
upon numismatic evidence we proved to date as having been filled 
in circa 450 A.D. {Wilts Arch. Mag., vol. xxix., p. 171). 

On removing the top soil we found that the excavation had a 
diameter of some 12ft., and after removing a depth of 3ft. of soil, 
in which we found nothing of any archaeological interest, we 



374 The Excavation of a Roman Well near Silbury Hill. 

readied a mass of sarsen stones of various sizes. These stones 
were loose and easily removed, but under them, to a. depth of 5|ft. 
we came across one sarsen which took the united strength of seven 
men to raise. It must have weighed nearly half-a-ton, it was 
standing on end, and very difficult to rope, as the well at this 
depth contracted to a diameter of 4ft. 6in. From subsequent 
"finds" it is a reasonable conjecture that Messrs. W. and H. 
Cunnington failed to remove this impediment, because from this 
point downwards relics came up in every bucket, which would 
never have escaped the fingers of such enthusiasts ! 

The relics consist of necks, bases, handles, and pieces of pottery 
in a great variety of shapes, colours, and sizes, pieces of Samian 
ware, various bronze relics, beads, fragments of glass vessels, antler 
picks; bones of deer, dog, sheep, ox, pig, rat; flint flakes (3), 
square-headed iron nails, perforated roofing tiles, an iron bucket- 
handle clip, a moulded freestone corbel and base of a column, 
oyster and snail shells ; and thirty-three Eoman coins. 

Careful record was kept of each article found, with notes of its 
depth, position, and association with other relics, but as the date 
of filling in must necessarily be posterior to that of the most recent 
coin, a lengthy list of the positions of the various articles brought 
to light would be superfluous — the coins being scattered indiscrimi- 
nately throughout, the most ancient (a sestertius of Trajan) being 
found at 18ft. deep, and the more recent coins of Valentinian I. 
being found at the bottom of the excavation. 

It took six days to reach the solid undisturbed chalk bottom, 
which, upon measurement, was found to be 26ft. from the surface. 
The well was unsteined and waterless, but several holes or chalk 
tubes which once furnished the supply were noticed. 

The work was hindered throughout by large sarsen stones, which 
were probably thrown in to get rid of them, and these in falling 
from a height would naturally wedge in. Several stones had to 
be broken ere they could be moved — indeed a very difficult pro- 
cedure considering the cramped space for shoulder and elbow work. 

After consideration I conclude that the well had been filled in 
while Valentinian I. (364 — 375 A.D.) wore the purple, with j 



The Excavation of a Roman Well near Silbury Hill. 375 

rubbish from middens and clean sandy deposits from the stream, 
as the latter contained twigs, water-worn stones, and pieces of 
pottery with rounded edges. The relics are of various periods, 
suggesting previous occupations. 

During the progress of the work I had several visitors, but the 
work was kept as dark as possible,because of the great risk run to the 
men when working in a small deep space by interested individuals, 
who, leaning forward with craned necks, are not mindful of the 
danger caused by a stone falling on to a man's head. I should 
like to draw special attention to the finding of worked building 
stones, large iron nails, and roofing tiles. Similar relics were found 
in excavating a kitchen midden near Silbury in 1867 (Smith's 
North Wilts, p. 162), and also in the Eoman well opened in 1882, 
as before mentioned. The fact strengthens the theory that the 
remains of a Koman building of the time of Valentinian I. exists 
and remains to be unearthed, somewhere near Silbury Hill. 

The relics are in my private museum, and may be inspected by 
anyone by previous arrangement. 



vol. xxxvi. — no. cxiii. 2 c 



376 



THE TRINITY HOSPITAL, SALISBURY, 
By T. H. Baker. 

The Hospital of the Holy Trinity is, next to that of St. Nicholas, 
the oldest charitable institution in the city. Hatcher, in his 
History of Old and Neiv Sarum, gives its origin in the following 
words : — " The Trinity Hospital, or Alms House, owed its origin to 
Agnes Bottenham, 1 who appears to have been living about the 
middle of the fourteenth century. It was erected on the spot 
which had been previously occupied by a common brothel. Her 
benefactions, as mentioned in subsequent deeds, afforded a perpetual 
maintenance to twelve poor persons, and also hospitality nightly to 
twelve poor strangers, if so many should claim an asylum, with 
liberty to tarry three days and nights, if any desired such an in- 
dulgence. Those who fell sick were to receive accommodation and 
attendance till restored to health. To the establishment was 
attached an endowment for a chaplain to celebrate the divine 
offices. The paupers permanently resident, as well as the tem- 
porary guests, were four times daily to repeat the Psalter of the 
Blessed Virgin Mary. 2 

1 Agnes Bottenham was widow of John Bottenham. This is evident from 
a conveyance of a tenement which is still existing in the municipal strong 
room in the Domesday book of Salisbury, in which are recorded all the 
transfers of property within the city. 

Nouerint vniuersi me Johannem Chaundeler, sen r . de Noua Sarum 
execut r . testamenti Agnet s . que fuit vxor Johannis de Bottenham nuper 
ciuis Ciuitatis Noue Sar vendidisse, concessisse remississe, relaxisse & 
omninopro me, heredibz &executoribz meis imperpetuumquietclamasse& 
hoc scripto meo confirmasse Johanni Wychford, heredibz & assignatis I 
suis totum jus meum & clameum que virtute testamenti predictse Agnetis | 
vel aliquo alio jure seu titulo quocunque habeo, habui seu quovis modo ; 
habere potero in futuro in illis viginti solidis annui redditus provenerit de ; 
toto illo tenemento cum pertinentijs predicto Johanni "Wychford quod i 
situm est in Ciuitate predicta in Castelstret inter tenementum nuper i 
Gilberti St'koks ex parte australi & tenementum nuper Johannis Benet 
ex parte boriali. 

A.D. 1399. 1 Hen. IV. 

3 Fifty aves and fifty paternosters. 



The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury. 377 

Indulgence. At no very distant period from the original foun- 
dation an indulgence was published by Simon Sudbury, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, in conjunction with William, Bishop of London, 
William of Winchester (Wykeham), Thomas of Durham, Thomas 
of Ely, John of Lincoln, Kalph of Sarum, Thomas of Exeter, John 
of Bath and Wells, Thomas of Bochester, John of Hereford, and 
William of St. Asaph, each granting forty days of indulgence to 
such of the parishioners of their respective dioceses, as being truly 
penitent, and having confessed, should contribute, bequeath, or 
assign, any charitable aid, toward the maintenance of the poor, 
feeble, and distressed inmates of this hospital. (Dated at West- 
minster, May, 1379.) 

Chapel. A new chapel appears to have been erected about 
this period by the contributions of the faithful, for we find a bull 
of Bope Boniface the Ninth, who occupied the chair from 1398 to 
1405, dated St. Beter's, on the 13th kalends of April, in the first 
year of his pontificate, and addressed to the Bector of the Boor in 
the hospital of the Holy Trinity. It states that in consequence of 
the devotion which he had manifested towards the Holy See, the 
Bope had given him liberty to cause the chapel, long before erected 
in the hospital, to be consecrated, and the mass and other divine 
offices to be celebrated in it at convenient times. He further 
granted to the hospital the permission to use a bell, saving, however, 
the rights of the parish Church, and all other rights whatsoever. 

It was probably in consequence of the last clause in this bull 
that Bichard Metford, who was Bishop from 1395 to 1407, together 
with the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral, as Bectors of St. 
Martin, in which parish the hospital is situated, yielded to the 
hospital all the offerings made in the chapel of the establishment. 

More abundant benefactions were now bestowed on the hospital. 
In 1400 Henry the Fourth granted licence to John Chandeler, the 
elder, of New Sarum, to assign two messuages, fifteen cottages and 
four shillings annual rent, amounting to the yearly value of sixty- 
seven shillings and four pence, to Adam Teffont, mayor, as master 
of the said hospital, and to his successors in the same office. This 
licence recites a prior grant from Henry to Adam Teffont, 

2 c 2 



378 The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury. 

permitting him to purchase lands and tenements for the use of the 
hospital to the amount of twenty pounds yearly. It rates the 
lands and tenements assigned by John Chandeler, as making a 
hundred shillings of that sum. 

By these benefactions, and by the liberal contributions of the 
devout and charitable, the funds of the hospital were considerably 
increased, and its benefits proportionably extended. A document 
which may be assigned to the fourteenth century, after an allusion 
to the iniquities which had been perpetrated on the spot, while 
occupied as a brothel, where adulteries, theft, and murder, and all 
other mortal sins, had been committed, to the destruction of many, 
and the great peril of souls, says that the founders, by the inspiration 
of the Holy Spirit, had set up thirty beds for the succour of the poor 
and sick daily resorting thither, and the seven works of charity were 
there fulfilled — the hungry were fed, the thirsty had drink, the 
naked were clothed, the sick were comforted, the dead were buried, 
the mad were restored to their reason, orphans and widows were 
nourished, pregnant women were kept till they were delivered, 
recovered, and churched. After adverting to the twelve inmates 
and twelve strangers, for whom accommodation was originally 
provided, it states that the master or warden shall supply them 
with victuals and all other necessaries; and if any one fall 
sick, he shall remain till restored to health. Two priests, also, are 
to officiate there continually, one for the ancient constitution, the 
other to be maintained by the warden from the charities of the 
faithful. These priests are daily to say mattins, the canonical 
hours, 1 Placebo and Dirige with the Commendation, and also 

1 The canonical Hours or divine service i.e., The Psalter containing the 
psalms and canticles. 

The services of the dead The Officium pro Defunctis, or Vigilice mortuorum, 
or Dirge consisted of two parts : the Evensong, or Placebo, so called from 
the antiphon with which the service commenced " Placebo Domino in regions 
vivorum," and the Mattins (with Lauds) also called Dirige from its first 
antiphon, " Dirige Dornine Deus meus in conspectu tuo viam niearn." These 
offices were constantly said at other times, and as a private devotion, and 
thus formed a part of the Primer (History of the Book of Common Prayer, 
Francis Procter, M.A., revised by Walter Howard Frere, M.A.). 

From the ninth century onward there are to be found Votiva Laus in 



By T. H. Baker. 37 9 

continually to celebrate masses whenever there is an auditory. 
All other priests, likewise, daily resorting thither from devotion, 
shall have power to celebrate, and the sub-warden, for the time 
being, shall furnish them with bread, wine, and all requisites for 

veneracione Sanctce Marice Virginis, JTorce de Trinitate, Horce de Sancto 
Spiritu, Horce in honore Sancte Crucis, and (most commonly of all) Horce de 
Beata Virgine Maria attached together with private prayers and for the 
purposes of private devotion to copies of the Psalter, and from the thirteenth 
century onward these additions, after acquiring a status of their own, as an 
appendix to the Psalter, were thrown off and became a separate book, varying 
greatly both in its contents and in its titles. From one point of view the set 
services, and especially the Horce B.V.M., were the most conspicuous part 
of the collection, and consequently the name of Horce B.V.M. was given to 
the whole : from another point of view the educational value of the layman's 
book (often, no doubt, his only one) was made more prominent than the 
devotional; the A. B. C, Paternoster, Ave M aria, Devotions in English^ 
&c, were prefixed to it, and it thus became his lesson book, and was called 
the " Primer." 

The earliest complete printed book of this class which is known is one issued 
by W. de Worde circa 1494. Its contents are (1) Orationes quotidiance, 
(2) Horce B.V.M. in Latin, one series of seven hours to be said without 
variation; but printed with the special antiphons, chapters, &c, of "Hours 
of the Passion" and "Hours of the Compassion B.V.M." appended to it, so 
that these services could be used as alternatives. 

(3) Miscellaneous prayers. 

(4) The seven penitential Psalms and the fifteen gradual Psalms. 

(5) The Litany and Suffrages. 

(6) The Services of the Dead {Placebo, Dirige and Commendation). 

(7) The Psalms of the Passion, xxii — xxxi., with the selection from the 
Psalms known as S. Jerome's Psalter. 

(8) An appendix in English, containing " The xv Oes and other prayers. 
The tender care which the primitive and medieval Church bestowed upon 

the departed is a natural sequel of its care for the sick and dying. A con- 
tinuous round of prayer was maintained. During the last agony psalms and 
litanies were said, ending with a solemn farewell in the name of the blessed 
Trinity, the orders of angels, and the company of saints, and a solemn series 
of petitions to God to deliver the soul of his servant from all dangers. After 
death came the service of Commendation, consisting of psalms with their 
antiphons and collects at intervals, and during it the body was prepared for 
burial. Psalmody again accompanied the carrying of the corpse to the Church. 
Then began the services connected with the burial ; first the Office of the 
[Dead (Evensong, Mattins, and Lauds), then the Requiem Mass, then a short 
I form of Commendation and the censing and sprinkling with holy water, of 
i the body, and lastly the actual Burial Service. After the funeral, Memorial 
Services were said, both the Office of the Dead and the Requiem Mass, 
[especially during the month immediately following and on the anniversary. 



380 The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury. 

the purpose. The permanent paupers in addition to the Psalter 
of the Virgin originally prescribed, are to repeat the said Psalter 
once more daily, for all benefactors, and all the brethren and sisters 
of the said hospital. 

As an inducement to benefactors, the spiritual benefits to which 
they were entitled are thus enumerated : — " The sum of the in- 
dulgences, granted by different bishops, amounts to three years, 
three times forty, and six hundred days ; the sum of the masses, 
mattins, hours, and offices of the dead, is two thousand, one hundred 
and ninety, yearly, besides those masses, mattins, and other divine 
offices, which are said by others resorting to the hospital, the 
number of which is known to God alone. The sum of the Psalters 
of the eighteen poor persons, said there daily, amounts to twenty- 
six thousand two hundred and eighty, exclusive of those of poor 
persons who flock thither, which are reserved to be numbered by 
divine wisdom." 

From this it is evident that a chapel formed part of the original 
foundation. There is no record in existence of the architectural 
features of this building, doubtless it was demolished in 1702 — 4 
when the present structure was erected. That it was elaborately 
equipped with all the accessories essential for carrying out the 
ritual of the Church at the period is shown by two inventories 
which still exist in the municipal strong room. The earlier, 
bearing the date 1418, is as follows: — 

Hec indentura facta apud Nouarn Saruin die Martis in vigilia sancti 
Thome apostoli Anno regni Eegis Henrici quinti post conquestuni sexto. 
Inter Robertum Puynant niaiorem Ciuitatis Noue Sarurn ac magistruin & 
Custodern domus siue hospitalis sancte Trinitatis vocate Ahneshous in 
predicta Ciuitate ex vna parte & Willelmum Panyter subcustodem eiusdem 
maioris ibidem substitutum & impositum ex parte altera testatur quod 
predictus maior ac magister & custos commisit & liberauit prefato 
Willelmo subcustodi & substituto suo bona & catalla dicte domui 
siue hospitali pertinentia bene & fideliter conseruanda & gubernanda ad 
opus languentium hospitalis predicti & eisdern ministranda & tandem 
eidein inaiori & magistro vel successoribus suis maioribus & custodibus 
dicti hospitalis cum ipse subcustos ab officio suo ibidem amotus fuerit 
sursum reddenda & liberanda per rationabilem compotum tarn de eisdeni 
bonis quam de redditibus & alijs proficuis domui predicte interim con- 
trauentibus & prouenientibus, viz : — 



By T. H. Baker. 381 

In Capella vnum pannum proxime altari pro tuelljis conseruandis. 
„ v tuellias cum frontallibus et ij tuellias sine frontall. 
„ j pannum de cerico embroudatum pendentem in parte 

superiore altaris cum ridello. 
„ Et ij pannos staynatos pro inferiori parte altaris. 
„ Et ij pannos de consimili pro parte superiore cum ij 

ridellis Et iij pixides pro pane imponenda. 
„ ij pannos pro altare tempore xl u . (quadragesimali). 

Et iij pannos pro Imaginibus cooperiendis. 
„ ij paria candelebrarum (sic) vnde j par de latino & aliud 

par de stagno. 
„ vnum pannum pro sepulchro staynatum. 
„ Et j plumarium pro eodem cum ij crucibus. 
,, Vnumparuum turibulum Etnauem pro incensu de peutro 

cum iij crewettes. 
Ornamenta de Capelle ij tabulas paruas depictatas pro altare. Et 

vnum pannum pro mortuis 
„ vij vestimenta pro solo sacerdote vnde iij paria de cerico 

cum apparatu. ij vestimenta diuersorum operum cum 

apparatu de Bordelisandre. Et. j vestimentum glaucum 

Vetus & debile. 
,, ij calices exteriores non de auro cum patenis. Et iiij 

corporas cum casulis. 
„ j surplicium. Et j paxbred. 
„ ij tuellias curtas pro pauperibus communicandis. 

Et ij tuellias pro lauatorio. 
„ j missale bene ligatum. Et ij portiforia vnde j liber notatus 

& alius non notatus. 
,, Et vnum librum pro extremitate facienda in vnctione cum 

i eleuat 1 pro eodem officio. 
„ j campanam ad diurnum officium premuniendum 
,, ij alias campanaspro sacratione. Et ij canapia cum pixide 

supra altare. 
„ v Imagines vnde j de sancta Trinitate alia de virgine 

Maria, alia sancti Johannis Baptiste, alia sancti Thome 

& alia sancti laurentij. Et j pannum pro toto altare 

prius recessum Capellani cooperiendo. 
„ j magnam tabulam in parte superiore altaris cum Imagi- 
nibus de Alabastro. 
,, ij magnas alias stantes tabulas iuxta Imagines depictas. 
Et vnam lapidem [? lapideam]. 
lecti in dormitoriis et solariis. It. v lectos tabulis inclusis pro viris in 

parte inferiore coram altari ex vna parte cum vesti- 

mentis & aliis neeessariis pro eisdern. 
,, iij lectos ex altera parte pro feminis cum aliis neeessariis. 
,, ix lectos tabulis inclusos in diuersis cameris in gardino 

extra Capellam. 

1 01evat=oilevat. 



382 The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury. 

lecti in dormitoriis et solariis. Et vj lectos supra in Dormitorio coram 
altari tabulis inelusos. Et j magnam cistam. Et iij 
lectos in diuersis cameris ibidem tabulis inelusos in 
solario. 
„ Et ij lectos in cameris ante super vicum tabulis inelusos. 
In Aula & in promptuario. Vnam Doser de rubro & albo cum bankero. 
Et in promptuario ij mappas diapriatas & iij tuellias 
diapriatas cum ij tuelliis. 
„ iij mappas de canabo. iiij rnanutergia debilia & vnum 
Almarium pro victualibus imponendis. 
Et j magnam ollam eneam pro festo sancte Trinitatis In 
storhous supra promptuarium iiij rubros pannos de 
Worstede pro capella. 
xxv cooportoria diuersorum colorum & operum pro lectis 
Cum xiiij quiltis pro lectis. ij paria de blankettes 
laneis. 
„ xxiij paria linthiamina & j caneuas. vnum peciam argenti 
cum Imagine Katarine in medio. Et ix coclearia 
argenti diuersarum formarum et ij mazera Vetera 
argento ligata. Vnde in medio j Gryffyn. Et in alia 
bussellus argenti. 
,, Et j magnam ollam eneam xij lagenis pro festo sancte 

Trinitatis. 
„ j magnam patellam. Et. vj ollas eneas maiores & minores 

& j vrciolum. 
„ J. Chaior (?)' vj perapsides xiij Discos ix saucres (sic), 
Et. iij ollas de peuter. unde ij de potello & j de quarto. 

Cum j lauacro ponendo in cista. 
ix patellas diuersarum quantitarum v ollas eneas maiores 
& minores j. chafin. 
In coquina j camenam ferri rotundam j.Veru longum cum j pari 
de Aundires. Et j boket ferro ligatum. Et j. caui- 
panam pro pauperibus ad prandium conuocandis. 
In cuius rei testimonium Sigilla partium predictorum partibus hujus 
indenture sigilla sua alternatim apposita Datum loco 
die & Anno supradictis. 

(Dec. 20th, 1418.) 

Translation of the Inventory (1418) : — 

This Indenture made at New Sarum on Tuesday, in the vigil of St. 
Thomas the Apostle in the sixth year of King Henry the fifth since the 
conquest. Between Eobert Puynant, Mayor of the City of New Sarum 
and master and custodian of the house or hospital of the holy Trinity 
called Almshouse in the aforesaid City, on the one part & William Panyter, 
subwarden of the same mayor there substituted & appointed on the 
other part, testifies that the aforesaid mayor and master has committed 

' A charger ? 



By T. H. Baker. 383 

and delivered to the aforesaid William his subwarden and substitute 
the goods and chattels to the said house or hospital appertaining, well 
& faithfully to preserve & govern to the use of the sick of the said hospital 
and to administer to the same & at length to restore to the same Mayor 
and master or to his successors Mayors and custodians of the said hospital 
when he the subwarden shall be removed from his office at that place, 
and also to return & deliver a reasonable account, as well of the same 
goods as of the rents and other profits to the aforesaid house in the 
meantime belonging and accruing. 

In the Chapel. A cloth near the altar for keeping the towels. 

v. towels with frontals & ij towels without frontals. 

j cloth of silk embroidered hanging on the upper part of the altar with 
a curtain. 

And ij cloths stained for the lower part of the altar. 

And ij similar cloths for the upper part with ij curtains. 

And iij pixes for putting the bread in. 

ij cloths for the altar at the time of Lent. 

And iij cloths for covering the images. 

ij pair of candlesticks of which j pair is of latten, the other of tin. 

A cloth for the sepulchre stained. 

And j cushion for the same with ij crosses. 

A little thurible, a ship for the incense of pewter with iij cruets. 

Ornaments of the chapel, vij vestments for the priest alone, of 
which iij pair are of silk with furnishing, ij vestments of divers work 
with furnishing of Bordelisandre. 1 

And j grey vestment, old and worn out, or worse for wear. 

ij chalices not gilt on the outside, with patens. 

And iij corporals with cases. 

j surplice and j paxbrede. 2 

ij short towels for the poor (men) communicating. 

And ij towels for the lavatory. 

j missal well bound. And ij Breviaries of which one book is noted, 
the other not noted. 

And one book for the office in extreme unction with j oilevat for the 
same office. 

j bell for calling to divine service. 

ij other bells for the consecration (sacring bells). 

And ij canopies with the pix over the altar. 

v images, of which j of the Holy Trinity, another of the Vfrgin Mary, 
another of St. John the Baptist, another of St. Thomas & another of 
Saint Laurence. 

And j cloth to cover the whole altar before the recess of the chaplain. 

j great table in the upper part of the altar with images of alabaster. 

1 Bordelisandre is supposed to be an embroidered stuff made at Alexandria. 

2 Pax-brede, or pax-borde is the small tablet of wood or metal ornamented 
with a sacred image used in the service of the mass for the kiss of peace. 



384 The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury. 

ij other great standing tables near the images painted. 
And one of stone. 

Beds in dormitories and solars. Also v beds enclosed with boards 
for men in the lower part before the altar on one side with bed clothes 
and other necessaries for the same. 

iij beds on the other part for women with other necessaries, 
ix beds enclosed with boards in different chambers in the garden 
beyond the chapel. 

And vj beds in the dormitory before the altar, enclosed with boards. 
And j great chest. 

And iij beds in divers chambers enclosed with boards in the solar there. 
And ij beds in the chambers in front towards the street enclosed with 
boards. 

In the Hall. One doser of red & white with a banker. 
And in the Buttery, ij table cloths, diapered & iij towels diapered 
with ij towels, iij table cloths of canvas iiij worn towels for wiping the 
hands & one cupboard for placing the victuals in. 

And j great brass pot for the feast of the Holy Trinity. 

In the Storehouse above the Buttery, iiij red cloths of worsted for 
the Chapel. 

xxv coverlets of different colours and workmanship for the beds with 
xiiij quilts for the beds, ij pair of blankets (woollen ?) [Ian ? the original 
appears to be " sail," which probably would mean of blood colour] xxiij 
pair of linen sheets and one canvas. 

A piece of silver with the image of St. Katherine in the middle. 
And ix silver spoons of different forms. And ij old mazers bound with 
silver, in the middle of one of which is a gryffyn. And in the other a 
small boss. ' 

And j great brass pot of xij gallons for the feast of the Holy Trinity, 
j greaj^dish. And vj brass pots, great and small & j pitcher, 
j Chaior (?). 2 vj meat dishes, xiij dishes, ix saucers and iij pots of 
pewter, of which ij are of a pottle & j of a quart. With j laver ? placed 
in a chest. 

ix dishes of various sizes, v brass pots great and small, 
j chafin dish. 

In the Kitchen, j round stove made of iron, j long spit, wfth j pair 
of aundires. 3 And j bucket bound with iron. And j bell for calling the 
poor people to dinner. 

In witness whereof the seals of the aforesaid parties to the parts of 
this indenture alternately are affixed. Dated in the place, day, and year 
abovesaid. 
Trinity Hospital Inventory, 1436 : — 

Hec Indentura testatur quod Thomas ffreman, Maior Ciuitatis None 
Sarum ac magister siue custos Hospitalis sancte Trinitatis & sancti 

1 The original is husself, i.e., a "bushell," or small silver boss in the inside 
of the bowl of the mazer. 

2 ? Charger. 3 Aundires=andirons. 



By T. H. Baker. 385 

Thome Cantuariensis Archiepiscopi & Martiris gloriosi tradidit & liberauit 
Eoberto Trassrawell subcustodi hospitalis predicti omnia bona eiusdem 
hospitalis, subscripta saluo custodienda & ad compotum inde infra octauas 
sancte Trinitatis vel alias quacunque per Maiorem predietum & succes- 
sores suos, maiores & custodes dicti hospitalis requisites fuit rationabile 
premunitione quindecim dierum prehabita reddenda. In primis in 
Aula duo Tabule dormientes precij viij a . It. v. formile pretij xviij d . 
Item duo Tangerdes ferro ligate, pretij xij d . Item tria Bankers cum uno 
Docer'ypalid, (sic) pretij xij d . Item vnacampanaadpulsandamadprandia 
pretij xx a . Item vnus Vergis barell pretij. vj d . In coquina Inprimis vna 

magna olla enea ponderis & j u . libra ij d . Sm a . x s . ij a . Item se- 

ii] 
cundo pot, ponderis xlij". libra ij d . Sm a yij s . Item tercio pot, ponderis 
xxviij' 1 . libra ij d . Sm a iiij s . viij d . Item vnum posnet cum vno 
handel ponderis x 1 '. vnde libra ij d . Sm a . xx a . Item quinque 
pritelle (sir) ponderis xxij 11 . & dimidia, vnde libra ij d . Sm 1 . iij s . ix d . Item 
a gridire & vnum ffryeng panne ponderis viij 1 '. Sm a . viij d . Item duo 
Broches & ij Aundires ponderis xxxvii 11 . vnde libra j d . Srn a . iij s . j d . vnum 
zex 2 pretij. j d . Item vj perapcides xiijj disci, vij saucers vnum Charcher 
de peutyr, ponderis xxxvij 11 . vnde libra ij d . Sm a . vj s . ij d . Item iij Wegys 3 
de yre pretij viij d . Item iij ladders pretij vj d . Item vnum Coble ferri 
pretij ij d . Item in pincerna. Inprimis ij mappe mensales pretij xiiij d . 
Item vnum maser cum a bond argente & deauratum pretij vj s . viij d . 
Item sex cocliaria ponderis iiij vncie vnde ij s . vj d . vncie. Sm a . x s . Item 
vij hogettys ' pretij ij s . iiij d . Item ij seldres pro oale pretij iii d . Item ij 
Basonys ij lauers, v Candelabra ponderis xxiij 1 ' unde li iij d . Sm a . v s . ix d . 
Item Almaria & vnum Busshel pretij xx d . Item vnum Trowe pro pane 
imponenda & ij perapcides ligni & vnum Bolle pretij vj d . Item duo alia 
vasa vnde vnum pro otmele & aliam pro oale 4 pretij ij d . Item vnum 
magnum Tankard pretij iiij a . 

Item in Capella vnum aut r cloth y workyd cum vno ffruntell de Cerico 
subraudid cum serpents pretij iij s . iiij d . Item vnum Auf Cloth cum vno 
Suffront ystayned wyth the salutation pretii ij s . Item ij Towell de playn 
work pretij vj d . Item vnum cloth de raynes cum blod scriptis in fine 
pvetij xv j d . Item vnum Box pro corpore x' [ Christ] & ij Canypes pretij 
xij d . Item vna tabila de alabastro pro altare cum vij ymages cum crucifix 
desuper pretij x s . Item duo ymages vna de Trinitate cum tabernaculo 
& alia de sancto Thoma pretij xiij 9 . iiij d . Item ymago de Marie de 
alabastro pretij iij s . iiij a . Item ij Tabelettes pretij xvj*. Item ymago 
sancti Johannis Baptiste & alia sancti laurencij pretij iij s . iiij a . Item vna 
crux de latyn pro processione pretij xx d . Item a Senc r . de latyn pretij 



1 Docer or Doser=Dorser, a Hanging. Banker=a cloth, carpet, or cover- 
ing of tapestry for a form, bench, or seat. Halliwell's Diet. 

2 Zex (A. S. Seax a short sword) a tiler's tool for chopping slates — (Pulman). 

3 Wegys=Wedges of iron. 4 i.e., ale. 



386 The Trinity Hospital, Salisbury. 

xij d . Item vnum Cofre ferro ligatum & aliud Cofre pretij iiij 3 . Item a 
ffrount and suffrount ystaynyd. ij rydell eiusdem secte pretij iiij s . Item iij 
Brodeclothes workid vnum ffruntell de Bay pretij ij 3 . Item duo Calices 
ponderis xxj vncie ij*. viij d . ounce lvj B . Item vnum missale in primo 
folio incipiens Omnibus dominicis pretij v marcs. Item vnum Portowys 
ynotid in secundo folio incipiens per domini Animam. Item aliud 
Portowys absque notis in primo folio incipiens dominica pa 1 pretij Ambo 
v marcs. Item vnum psalterium incipiens secundo folio Es tu pretij xx d . 
Item v hole Tables pretij ij s . Item vnum staynyd cloth pro sepulchro 
pretij xl d . Item a ffrount & vnum suffrount & ij Eydell pro xl a2 ystayned 
pretij vj s . viij d . Item vnum lentecloth cum Trinitate & aliud cum duobus 
Angelis cum vernacula pretij ij 8 . viij' 1 . Item vnum Corporax cum caas 
de Bay pretij xij d . Item a corporas cum a cace embraudid cum salutatione 
pretij xvj d . Item vnum corporas cum vno Caas embraudid w th Jhe 
pretij xl d . Item a corporas cum vno Caas de Eay cum rubro cruce 
pretij viij d . Item a corporas caas cum volucris pretij iiij d . Item Eidell 
de serico pretij viij d . Item iiij Tuell of Work pretij ij s . viij d . Item vnum 
Aut r cloth yworkyd cum cruce embraudid pretij ij s . Item vnum suffront 
de cerico embradid in medio cum Trinitate & Aut 1 . cloth yworked pretij 
v 3 . Item a Chisible, a Aube, cum Stole ffanel & Amys, de Bostian pretij 
x s . Item Aube, Amys, Stole ffanel & Chisible de cerico cum Trinitate in 
dorso pretij xxiij 8 . iiij d . Item Aube, Amys, stole, ffanel Chisible de albo & 
rubro chekered pretij vj s . viij d . Item Chesible cum toto Apparatu de 
clothe de Coleyn pretij vj s . viij d . Item Chisible cum toto apparatu de 
Bordalisaundre pretij viij 3 . iiij d . Item Chisible cum toto apparatu de 
Eubro Eay pretij V s . Item Chisible cum toto apparatu de rubro cerico 
pretij v 9 . Item Autercloth cum iij corsis pretij viij". Item ymago de 
sancto Michalle ystaynd pretij xij d . Item duo Candelabra de peuter & 
duo de lygno pretij x d . Item Haly Water boket dy Tyn pretij iiij d . Item 
in the Womanchamber. In primis vj Couerlits pretij ij s . Item a quilte 
pretij viij d . Item a peir linthiaminium pretij vj d . Item a Courlyt cum 
M. And a cheker pretij xvj d . Item in ye Gystynchamber. ' In primis 
v Courlytys pretij v 3 . Item duo Blanketts pretij xvj d . Item duo paria 
de Shets & vnum Bolster pretij ij s . Item in seconda Chamber ij 
Couerlits ij lynthiamina & vnum Blanket pretij xij d . Item in tercia 
camera. In primis a Helynge propius le Straw (sic) pretij iiij d . Item 
vnum par lodicium pretij xvj d . Item vnum par linthiamini pretij xx d . 
Item vnum Couerlyt cum libdes hedes 3 (sic) pretij xvj d . Item aliud cum 
cheker work pretij vi d . Item aliud cum yolw flour de lylye pretij xvj d . 
Item aliud Courlyt de lylyes pretij xvj d . Item a Courlyt de viride 
Chapeletts pretij ij s . Item aliud cum auibus half lynne & half wolle 
pretij ij s . Item in le Cloth Chamber In primis vnum Cooportorium 
cum Chapeletts pretij xij d . Item iiij Blanketts pretij iiij s . Item 
vnum Cooportorium de blod half lynne and halfe wolle pretij iij'. 
Item A bed & Tester de rubro cum Chapeletts & Stre in medio 
pretij vj 3 . viij d . Item vnum Bed de albo cum rubro flore de lylie 
pretij ij s . Item vnum cooportorium de Eay cum flours in y e Eay 

1 pa probably=prima. * i.e., Lent. 3 Leopards' heads. 



By T. H. Baker. 387 



pretij xx d . Item vnum cooportorium de russetto cum albis rosis & rubris 
half lynnyn & half wollyn pretij ij s . vj d . Item vnum Cooportorium cum 
lionibus & Grypys de rubro pretij iij s . Item vnum Cooportorium cum 
Blew Popynyayes pretij xx d . Item vnum Cooportorium cum rubro 
Dyse pretij viij d . Item vnum Quilte cum Shildes pretij xvj d . Item a 
playn Quilte large pretij xij d . Item a Quilte cum serico de Eubro pretij 
xvj a . Item vnum matras ywrowgt cum Vyne leves by y e syde pretij xx d . 
Item vnum playn Quilte pretij xij d . Item vnum large Quilte cum vno 
Cumpas in medio pretij xx d . Item vnum antique Quilte pretij iiij a . 
Item ij Whitchys 1 & vnum Cofre pretij iij 8 . iiij d . Item in Camera vltra 
Capellam. Inprimis duo magna Cofris pretij v s . Item duo fformys 
pretij viij d . Item vnum Cooportorium pretij iiij d . Item vnum 
cooportorium de albo colore pretij xij d . Sm a totalis bonorum predict 



The earliest accounts of the Hospital in existence are those from 
1407 to 1411, from which time they are missing to 1451. Since 
then they are nearly intact. Annexed is a transcript of that for 
1480, which is a fair specimen of them : — 

Computus Stephani Rotherford, sub-custodis Domus sive Hospitalis 
Sancte Trinitatis & Sancti Thome Martiris Archiepiscopi a ffesto Sancti 
Michaelis Archangeli, Anno Regni Regis Edwardi iiij". xix° vsque idem 
festum Anno ejusdem Regis xx° viz. per vnum Annum integrum. 

Augmentum Nullum. 

Redditus. Idem receptus de xij s . receptis de redditu illius tenementi 
in quo Johannis Caterton nuper habitabat modo in tenura Walteri 

^Harryes, Bruer, in vico de Wynmanstrete Ciuitatis Sarum ad iiij or Anni 
terminos per equales portiones. Et de vj\ viij d . receptis vnius tenementi 
in Culver strete, Civitatis in quo Rogerus Doly nuper habitabat. Et 
de x s . receptis de redditu vnius tenementi apud Barnewell Crosse quod 
Johannes Sendall, Mason tenet ad equales terminos. Et de viij s . receptis 
de redditu illorum duorum Cotagiorum iuxta idem tenementum. Et 
de vj s . iiij d . receptis de redditu illius tenementi in Gygorne strete Ciuitatis 
in quo Guido, laborer nuper habitabat ad equales terminos. Et de xx s . 
receptis de redditu vnius tenementi in Gygornestrete in quo Walterus 
Laurence, Bruer, nuper habitabat ad equales terminos. Et de iiij s . re- 
ceptis de redditu vnius tenementi apud Blackebrigge, Ciuitatis juxta 
latrinam ibidem quod Robertus Bowyer modo inhabitat. Et de vj". viij d . 
receptis de redditu illius alterius tenementi ibidem juxta idem tenementum 
quod Elizabeth Best vidua nuper tenuit ibidem. Et de vj s . viij d . receptis 
de tercio tenemento ibidem in q